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Full text of "Recreation"

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HARVARD UNIVERSITY 




LIBRARY 

OF THE 

MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY 

Bequest of 
WILLIAM BREWSTER 



VmJUyylwi,' //, /Q.2,0. 



RECREATION 



A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO EVERYTHING 

THE NAME IMPLIES 



/* 



VOLUME VIL 
JULY; 1897, TO DECEMBER, 1897 



/* 



G. O, SHIELDS (Coquina), Editor and Manager 



fi 



New York 
19 West Twenty-fourth Street 

1897 



COPYRIGHT, 1897, BY G. O. SHIELDS 



TROW DIRECTORY 

PRINTING AND BOOKBINDING COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



INDEX TO VOLUME VII. 



«♦ 



PAGE 



"With One Long, Silent Stroke She Glided into Mid-Stream." Frontispiece Harry Watson 

Pocahontas in England. Illustrated J. C. 

How the Big Ram Was Killed. Illustrated F. W. S. 10 

My Twenty-two Point Buck. Illustrated F. D. Hulburt 12 

The First Day of the Chicken Season A. B. Cowie 15 

Goose Shooting in Colorado. Illustrated W. E. King 19 

A Good Indian. Illustrated Nelson Yarnall 20 

" A Fishing Story. " (Poem.) Illustrated • Capt. H. P. Beckwith 22 

The Rented Bicycle Suit. Illustrated Walter I. Shay 23 

My Last Hunt in Kansas. Illustrated Gen. F. W. Benteen 27 

The Cowboy's Version of the Prodigal Son Pony Bill 31 

"Spring." (Poem) W.T.Jones 32 

Only a Dog A. W. Dimock 33 

Hoover's Ranch 1 Jas. Hanks 34 

Trouting on the Thunder A. D. Curtis 35 

Mark East ! S. T. Earns 37 

' ' Piscatory Evolution. ' ' (Poem. ) Illustrated Frank E. Page 38 

A Hard Ride in the Mountains , J. G. T. 39 

Rabbit Shooting in Kansas A. W. Bitting 40 

Some Old Guns. Illustrated Capt. Philip Reade, U.S.A. 41 

' ' He had White's Right Arm in his Capacious Mouth. ' ' Frontispiece Bert Cassidy 

A Bad Grizzly George W. Kellogg 87 

The Confessions of Lynx Canadensis. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 89 

« ' Oh Mother, Take the Wheel Away " Old Song 93 

Our Alaskan Exploring Expedition. Up the Stickeen. Illustrated A.J.Stone 94 

1 • Pete. ' ' Illustrated H. A. Horton 105 

Record Buffalo Heads . Illustrated ' W. T. H. 107 

My Wife's Moose. Illustrated W. E. Bemis 109 

In the Gaulies. Illustrated D. C. Braden 116 

A Reminiscence of Buffalo Days. Illustrated Capt. H. Romeyn, U.S.A. 117 

A Salt Water Breeze. Illustrated George G. Cantwell 

Old Fort Smith Mat. E. R. P. Shurly, U.S.A. 

In the Land of the Shag F. J. Church 

Fishing in the Mountains of Maryland L. L. Litman 124 

Camped in the Canyon. (Poem) James Hanks 126 

A Montana Dream. (Poem) John V. Cole 15S 

" Therefore I Jumped it."— Frontispiece Bert Cassidy ' 

How They Didn't Hit Him in the Eye J. B. Jennett 171 

' ' When Diana Gets Her Gun. " (Poem) Illustrated Stern Rakoff 174 

Work of the Swine. Illustrated J. D. P. 175 

An Autumn Horseback Trip. Illustrated..,. '. J. F. Gordon 176 

The Opening of the Season , R. B. Buckham 179 

A Cycle Race, with a Sequel Miss C. H. Thayer 182 

The Music of the Woods. (Poem) J. D. Crawford, Jr. 183 

Echoes in the Moonlight. (Poem) Marguerite Tracy 185 

A Yale-Princeton Football Game Courtland Nixon 186 

Ruffed Grouse and Woodcock U. B. 189 

Our Alaskan Exploring Expedition. Canoeing on the Stickeen. Illustrated A. J. Stone 190 

Catching a Tartar Capt. J. G. Leefe, U.S.A. 192 

A Canoe Trip to Rainy Lake - Harry Silver 195 

The King of the Gaulies Mark T. Leonard 197 

Elkland. Illustrated Ernest Seton Thompson 199 

The Bear, the Belle, and the Blackberries Frances Webster 202 

A Boating Song (Poem) E. W. Mason 204 

How We Photographed the Wild Cat Coyote Bill 205 

The Wolf Question R. M. Allen, R. Ashworth, and Dr. Frank Dunham 207 

The Broadway Cable Sings. (Poem) Marguerite Tracy 210 

My Recreation. (Poem) Hon. S. B. McManus 232 



119 
121 

122 



PAGE 

The New Sport. Bait-Casting for Fox-Terriers Frontispiece 

The Willet. Illustrated Wilmot Townsend 255 

The Mongolian Pheasant. Illustrated G. M. Miller 258 

The Salmon's Rival C. F. Holder 260 

A Day in the Adirondacks J. Rodemeyer, Jr. 263 

An Ideal Camp. (Poem) C. P. 265 

A League of American Sportsmen Ralph D. Lydecker 266 

Biking for Bass W. W. Blackwell 269 

A Bear Hunt in the Trinity Mountains H. C. Crocker 271 

Unknown to the Jury Will Scribbler 273 

A Winter Day's Sport Wm. Gerard Chapman, Jr. 277 

A Dry Camp Dr. E. B. Davis 278 

A Comanche Liar Capt. C.J. Crane 279 

On Croatan _ E. J. Myers 281 

Recreation (Poem) '. Beth Day 285 

Elkland. (Illustrated) Ernest Seton Thompson 286 

The Little Breakwaters Marguerite Tracy 290 

The Copper River Country L. L. Bales 291 

The Wolf Question. . Edw. L. Munson, L. A. Huffman, Vic Smith, Geo. B. McClellan, M. P. Dunham 293 

1 ' When the Wind Began to Blow Again I Would Sit Down and Slide in the Snow " Frontispiece 

Hunting Mountain Sheep in a Snow-storm. Illustrated Capt. S. A. Lawson 339 

Speed Skating A. M. Anderson 341 

Deer in the Coast Range Daniel Arrowsmith 343 

Memories of a Quail Hunt G. E. B. 345 

In the Shin-Oaks of Texas John C Casparis 347 

Shooting in Albania D. G. Cary-Elwes, F. S. A. 349 

The Chiricahu Hounds Lt. A. F. Capron, TJ. S. A. 351 

The Indian and the Deer Old Silver Tip 353 

Grouse in New Hampshire Old Bill 355 

In the Bitter Root Mountains. Illustrated H. S. Garfield, M. D. 357 

In.Early Days Geo. Hayden 359 

A Raid by the Kiowas T. C. Austin 361 

A Grizzly and a Muzzle-loader . A. Plummer 363 

Notes on Making Bird Skins F. E. Fleming 365 

Foxes in the Big Swamp C. P. Franklin . 367 

Grandfather's Wish. (Poem) J. C. Briggs 368 

Elkland, III. Illustrated Ernest Seton Thompson 369 

Adrift on an Ice Floe Peter Awick 372 

" In Autumn Time." (Poerri) " Olancha " 374 

The Wolf Question Hon. B. B. Brooks, Hon. Horace Beach, Otto Franc, and others 375 

While Sitting in the Blind. (Poem) Frank C. Riehl 379 

On the Chilkat Pass Harry L. Suydam 412 

' ' Lumbering Away Across the Bench Land. " Frontispiece 

A Ram and Some Grizzlies. Illustrated Hon. L. A. Huffman 423 

A Rangeley Vacation. Illustrated C. J. Halpen 425 

Among Iowa Quails. Illustrated •. E. A. Johnson 427 

" At Sea." (Poem) Illustrated . .Ethel Browning 430 

Watching. Illustrated E. W. Robins 431 

Chico. Illustrated B. C. Broome 436 

Hunting with a Camera. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 441 

The Timmer-Doodle . Illustrated Ernest Seton Thompson 445- 

Where are the Wild Pigeons? i Stanley Waterloo 451 

"Hog Killin'." (Poem) W. H. Nelson 454 

A Cart Load of Geese. Illustrated J. F. 455 

Elkland, IV. Illustrated Ernest Seton Thompson 456 

Cayuga Lake Coons Lou Smith 457 

Pierre's Stratagem H. D. Leadbetter 458 

The Wolf Question W. A. Cameron and R. Howes 460 

A Remarkable Shot Hon. W. A. Richards 464 

For a League of American Sportsmen 465 

Arrest of a Navajo Indian Murderer Lt. E. H. Plummer 469 

My First Buffalo Conrad Haney 472 

Woodcock and Snipe in Nova Scotia H . Austen 474 

Our Alaskan Exploring Expedition A. J. Stone 476 

Canvasbacks and Terrapin Col. Fred Mather 478 

The Successful Rearing of English Pheasants Percy Selous 480 

Canoe Sketches, II E. L. Cole" 481 

On White River J. M. Campbell 483 

Up Mount Katahdin F. S. Crabtree 484 

From the Game Fields 43, 127, 211, 298, 380, 485 Publisher's Department 82, 166, 250, 332, 415, 507 

Fish and Fishing 54, 140, 224, 308, 393, 493 Bicycling 73, 157, 241, 325, 407, 508 

Guns and Ammunition 60, 145, 229, 313, 397, 497 Canoeing ' 329, 410, 510 

Natural History 67, 151, 233, 317, 403, 502 Book Notices 76, 160, xxi, 413, 515 

Editor's Corner 72, 156, 238, 323, 406, 506 Amateur Photography 79, 162, 247, 335, 419, 571 



VOLUME VII. 
MUMBfcR 1 



JULY, 1897 



$1.00 A YT.AR 
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11 



RECREA TIOjV. 




MONARCH 

MONARCH CYCLE Kft (0. 



AND KEEP IH f KM 

CHICAGO • NtWYORK • LONDQN 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1896, by G. O. Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



J 1. 00 a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



<;. o. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



19 West 24T11 Street, 

York. 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 



"With One Long, Silent Stroke She Glided into Mid-Stream." Frontispiece Harry Watson 

Pocahontas in England. Illustrated J. C. 

How the Big Ram Was Killed. Illustrated F. W. S. 

My Twenty-two Point Buck. Illustrated F. D. Hulbi r 1 

The First Day of the Chicken Season A. B. Cowie 

Goose Shooting in Colorado. Illustrated W.E.King 

A Good Indian. Illustrated Nelson Yarnale 

" A Fishing Story." (Poem.) Illustrated Capt. H. P. Beckwith 

The Rented Bicycle Suit. Illustrated Walter I. Shay 

My Last Hunt in Kansas. Illustrated Gen. F. W. Benteen 

The Cowboy's Version of the Prodigal Son Pony Bill 

"Spring." (Poem) : W. T. Jones 

Only a Dog A. W. Dimock 

Hoover's Ranch Jas. Hanks 

Trouting on the Thunder A. D. Curtis 

Mark East! S. T. Earns 

" Piscatory Evolution." (Poem.) Illustrated Frank E. Page 

A Hard Ride in the Mountains J. G. T. 

Rabbit Shooting in Kansas A. W. Bitting 

Some Old Guns. Illustrated Capt. Philip Reade U.S.A. 

From the Game Fields 

Fish and Fishing 

Guns and Ammunition 

Natural History 

Editor's Corner 



Bicycling. . .. 

Puzzle Page 

Book Notices 

Amateur Photography. . . 
Publisher's Department. 



Page 

3 

10 
12 
t5 
19 
20 
22 
23 
27 

3« 

32 
33 
34 
35 
37 
38 
39 
40 

41 

73 
7.S 
76 
79 
82 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, i> 



Hoa Thomas Marshall 



Mayor of Keithsbtirg, III. 
WINNER OF 

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March 24, (897 



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XI 



AN OUT-DOOR ARTICLE 

A GENTLEMAN came into our office yesterday to buy a Gramophone. Casually we asked 

*^" him how he happened to get interested in our talking machines. He replied as follows : 

44 Several days ago I was in Washington, D. C, walking down Pennsylvania Avenue 

at about J 4th Street, when I noticed a crowd of people standing on the sidewalk, apparently 



interested or listening to something, 
singing * Ben Bolt ' in a mar- 
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the small horn of 
found to be the 
listened for a few 
heard this wonder- 
the Banjo, the 
baritone solo from 
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day. Icoulddis- 
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by clock work, 
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or $6.00 per dozen. I made 
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returned to New York, and I am 
It is the above statement 
readers of u Recreation " the fact 




MAUD FOSTER 



As I approached, I heard a voice 

velously distinct and pleasing 

people were looking across 

s/lvania Avenue (which 

hundred feet) at a sec- 

f rom which protruded 

which I afterward 

Gramophone. I 

moments, and I 

ful machine play 

Piano, sing a 

an opera, and 

ular songs of the 

tinctly hear and 

the words, I then 

vestigate it, and 

small machine run 

simple and not 

order, cost but $25.00 

chase as many records 

pleased, at 60 cents each 

up my mind then and 

one of those machines when I 

here to do so."e£tt£t<£tt£t<£t<£t«£<£t 

that causes us to lay before the 

that the Gramophone is a sum- 



mer outdoor entertainer. You can hear the strains of the full brass band on a still summer 
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Express charges paid to any point 

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The cut is a photograph of our tan walking shoe after having been worn two months. 

^wm—»w— »w ih i m— hw— w— *H^m— w n w— »«♦♦« 



RECREATION 



XUI 



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sea, reaching historic Mackinack Island at 
10.30 the second morning, thence up the ex- 
tremely picturesque St Mary's River, dotted 
with full 5,000 islands, and passing through 
the " Soo " and its world-famed locks, all by 
daylight. The following night and day are 
spent on the vast expanse and in the invigor- 
ating atmosphere of Lake Superior, Duluth 
coming into sight as the evening shadows 
fall. After three quarters of a day in the 
Zenith City the return trip is made in the 
reverse order, so that the entire route is seen, 
going or coming, by daylight, and Buffalo 
reached at noon of the seventh day. 

" Seven halcyon days of blessed rest," 
worth a month's ordinary vacation to the 
weary brain and tired body. 

While to this unequalled cruise for rest 
and health and pure enjoyment Nature has 
contributed so much that is grand and 
beautiful, nineteenth-century progress, as 
evidenced in the flourishing cities, summer 
resorts, and the immense commerce of the 
Lakes, has added that requisite so necessary 
to interest one, and so noticeably lacking in 
a mere ocean voyage. But it remained for 
the Northern Steamship Company to bring 
all within the experience of the tourist by a 
fleet of steamships which are to the Great 
Lakes what the finest hotels are to the most 
celebrated summer resorts. 

The North and The North West are, indeed, 
nothing less (and at the same time a great 
deal more) than great summer hotels afloat. 

Banish from your mind at once any idea 
of the 

" cabined, cribbed, confined " 

quarters of the ordinary steamship, and re- 



place it with the picture of private parlors 
en suite, with bath, brass bedsteads, couches, 
easy-chairs, electric lights, etc., with si 
rooms finished in Cuban mahogany. 

No freight is carried. Every precaution 
and every appliance known to marine archi- 
tecture of the very latest type, for the safety 
and the convenience of the passengers, are 
provided. 

The cuisine is equal in every respect to 
that of the finest hotels, while the appetizing 
air gives a zest to the enjoyment of the meals 
peculiar to this ozone-ladened atmosphere. 




The price of the round-trip ticket from 
Buffalo to Duluth and return is $29, less than 
1^ cents per mile. The price of berths, state- 
rooms, and suites of rooms varies, according 
to the location, capacity, and elegance, from 
$9 round trip. Meals are served a la carte, 
so that their cost can be regulated by the 
passenger. The menu prices are moderate, 
and, liberal portions being served, two or 
more persons traveling together can materi- 
ally reduce the cost of each. 

Passengers wishing to make longer stops 
at Cleveland, Detroit, Mackinack Island, 
Sault Ste. Marie, or Duluth than is made by 
the steamship, can obtain stop-over checks 
good for the entire season. 

Connections are made at Duluth with the 
Great Northern Railroad, Northern Pacific 
Railroad and diverging roads, for all points 
farther west to Yellowstone Park, Great 
Falls, Helena, Butte, Pacific Coast cities and 
Pacific Steamship lines. 

Further particulars will be furnished by 
addressing 

I. M. BORTLE, Gen. Pass Agent, 

Northern S. S. Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 
W. C. FARRINGTON. Vice-President. 

Or any railroad ticket agent, or the follow- 
ing agents of the Northern S. S. Co. : 

Boston, Mass., 211 Washington St., W. A. Seward, Gen'l Agt. 
Chicago, 111., 220 S. Clark St.. W. M. Lowrie, Gen'l Agt. Pass. Dept. 
Cincinnati, O., Fifth and Walnut Sts.. W. J. Byrth, Gen'l Agt. 
Cleveland, O., 239 Superior St.. D. J. Collver, Ticket Agt. 
Detroit, Mich., Foot First St., E. B. Clark, Gen'l Agt. 
Duluth. Minn., 432 W. Superior St., C D. Harper. X. Pass. Agt. 
Minneapolis, Minn.. 300 Nicollet Ave.. V. D. Jones, City P. & T. Agt. 
Montreal, Quebec, 1761 Notre Dame St., W. G. McLean, Trav. Agt. 
New York, N.Y., 375 B'way, E. D. Spencer, Gen'l Agt. Pass. Dept. 
Philadelphia, Pa., 42 So. Third St., A. C Harvev, Dist. Pass. Agt. 
Pittsburg, Pa., 405 Fifth Ave., Delano Luce, Pass.'Agt. 
St. Louis, Mo., 505 Olive St.. W. J. Evans, Gen'l Agt. 
St. Paul, Minn., 109 East Third "St., W. ]. Dutch. City P. & T. Ag». 
Toronto, Ont., 2 King St., East, H. G. McMicken. Gen'l Agt. 



XIV 



RECREA TION. 




WATCH! 



Fowler Cycle Mfg.Go 



Ghigago, 
New York. Boston, -Providenge.London, 

drop us a postal for a 97" catalogue. 



RECREA TION. 



XV 



FOR THE 

SKIN 
SCALP 



...and... 



COMPLEXION 




Fare, Antiseptic, Medicinal 

The grandest combination known for curing a bad skin and protecting a 
good complexion. "Manufactured by Dermatologist John H. Woodbury, 
who has made the Skin, Scalp, and Complexion a study for over twenty- 
six years. 

Woodbury's Facial Cream 

being absolutely free from grease or oil of any nature can be used freely 
on the face or hands without causing a superfluous growth of hair. It is 
delightfully perfumed and an acquisition to the toilet. 

Woodbury's Facial Soap 

contains the best Antiseptic known to Medical Science and will allay any 
irritation of the skin. Its daily use will eradicate Blackheads, Freckles, and 
Pimples, and when used in conjunction with Woodbury's Facial Cream 
will leave the skin clear, soft, and beautiful. They are sold everywhere. 

JOHN H. WOODBURY, Dermatological Institute 

Offices for the Cure of Skin and Nervous Diseases and the Removal of Facial Blemishes: 
New York, J27 W. 42d St.: Boston, \\ Winter St.: 

Philadelphia, J306 Walnut St.: Chicago, J 63 State St. 

Address all letters to 127 West 42d Street, New York. 

A sample of either Woodbury's Facial Soap or Facial Cream, with 132-page illustrated Beauty 
book, mailed on receipt of 10 cents by mentioning Recreation. 



xvi RECREA TION. 



THE 



VICTOR 



OFFICIAL 
LEAGUE 



BALL 



is recognized far and wide as the best 
league ball that money can buy 



Why not 
Use the 

Best? 



It is the only ball thai conforms exactly to the € 

specifications of the National League © 

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It is always uniform in size and shape . % 

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It will ouhoear any other league ball jj 

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It is honestly made of the finest materials only jj 

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We make a specialty of Team Outfits — j 

Uniforms, Bats, Mitts, and Gloves % 



S OVERMAN WHEEL CO. I 

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2 Makers of Victor Bicycles and Athletic Goods 

O New York Boston Chicago Detroit Denver 

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WITH ONE LONG, SILENT STROKE SHE GLIDED INTO MID-STREAM. 



Volume VII. 



RECREATION. 

JULY, \ 897. 

G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



Number >, 



POCAHONTAS IN ENGLAND. 



j. c. 



The chimes in the church tower, 
which were ringing the prelude to 
twelve, scattered their soft notes into 
the moonlit heavens. She was cold, 
very cold, and numb from lying long 
in her narrow cell. She threw off the 
damp winding-cloth and stood out 
from beneath the willow trees, in the 
light of the moon. It warmed her 
pale limbs. 

Two people were sitting by the river 
side, in the cool of the midsummer 
night. Their canoe, not far off, was 
held by its bow in the shore. 

' They say Pocahontas was buried 
over there in the churchyard," said 
one, thoughtfully. " Poor lady, she 
must have been tired enough of cities 
and captains and kings before she 
died." 

' Times have changed since then," 
said the other, softly. " Pocahontas 
would lie more at rest by the old Brit- 
ish Thames if she knew that every day 
it swarms with canoes frorn her Amer- 
ican wilds, and that people here have 
grown to love out-of-doors as their 
forefathers did, and to live nearer to 
Nature." 

As she heard this she stepped forth 
to the bank; stiffly at first, though 
warmed by the moon. Her feathers 
rose and fell along her back as she 
trod, and the white wampum on 
her leggins moved noiselessly. She 
stepped into the canoe and sank on her 
knees in the bottom. With one Ions:, 



silent stroke she glided into mid- 
stream. She did not look back at her 
gravestone, white in the moonlight, 
nor at the two people on the shore; 
but swept on and on, stroke after 
stroke. The cities of men she forgot, 
and the kings and the warriors, for her 
knees were on the floor of the craft 
she loved, and in her hands was the 
paddle, as of old, in the Indian wilds 
beyond the ocean. 

The slow bell was tolling — seven — 
eight — . 

" Look! " said one of the people on 
the bank, shuddering, and caught the 
Other by the arm. 

" I see nothing." 

" We will go to the inn," the first 
went on; " I am trembling." 

" Wait," said the other. " The canoe 
is 'gone. It must have drifted awav. 
I will find it." 

" I can not wait. — I saw it float 
away. — Come. I am cold." 

The bell tolled — nine — ten — . The 
bow of the canoe struck the opposite 
shore. The Indian girl stepped lightly 
forth and drew it up on the grass. She 
was warmer now — quite filled with the 
ghostly rays from the moon. 

The clock struck eleven, twelve, 
and then the vast silence of midnight 
fell upon the sky. Her hour had just 
begun. 

" Come," said the watcher; " come 
quickly. I am trembling. The night 
air has chilled me." 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY MVRA A. WIGGINS. 



HUNTING THE BIG HORN. 

Winner of First Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

Photo made with a Gundlach perigraphic lens. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY W. L. RATHBONE. 



IN THE SWIM. 
Winner of Second Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY F. T. HARMON. 



GEE ! 

Winner of Third Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 
Made with a Blair Camera, on a Stanley plate. 

5 









■ 



' 




AMATEUR PKOTO BV F. C. l'EAKKE. 



A BIG ONE AT LAST. 

Winner of Fourth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

Photo made with a Rochester Optical Co.'s Premo Camera, fitted with a Victor lens, on an Eastman Red 

Seal plate. 




AMATEl'R PHOT 



WALTERS. 



ALONE, PERHAPS. 
Winner of Fifth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATETR PHOTO BY I). M. BAI.IOV. 



AFTER BLACK BASS. 

Winner of Seventh Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

Made with a Premo Camera, on a Stanley dry plate. 

7 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY A. C. MELLETTE. 



AN AFRICAN HUNT. 
Winner of Sixth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY J. T. GRAVES. 



A PORTRAIT STUDY. 
By Gas Light. 



ACETYLENE GAS IN PHOTOGRAPHY. 



One of the latest illuminants, for photo- 
graphic use, is acetylene gas, the spectral 
analysis of which shows identically the 
same range of colors as daylight. Only a 
year ago acetylene gas became a commer- 
cial commodity and it is but a few months 



since experiments were made to test the 
light for photographic purposes. One of 
the leading Chicago photographers tested 
the light and found that excellent negatives 
could be made with it, with almost the same 
speed as in daylight. Since then the Camera 



IO 



RECREA TION. 



Club, of St. Catharines, Canada, placed an 
installation of the gas in its studio (one of 
the finest equipped galleries in Canada) and 
has, for the past few months, been carrying 
on extensive experiments. Several of the 
members now assert that artistic and beau- 
tifully lighted portrait studies can be as 
readily made with this light as by daylight. 
Of course the gas is not powerful enough 
to allow snap shots, in the studio, as neces- 
sary for children or nervous people ; but 
for all adults who can allow from 3 to 5 



seconds exposure magnificent results can 
be obtained. 

On the opposite page is shown a portrait 
study, made by Mr. J. T. Groves, one of 
Canada's most expert amateur photogra- 
phers, using acetylene gas as the illuminant. 
It is altogether probable that the next few 
months will find acetylene gas introduced 
into every up-to-date gallery in the country, 
especially as an installation of acetylene 
costs but little and, used intelligently, it is- 
as safe as any other gas. 



HOW THE BIG RAM WAS KILLED. 



w. s. 



" I have killed a great many mountain 
sheep," old Scotty MacDougall wrote from 
the Selkirks, to a friend in Tacoma, " but 
this is the craftiest old ram I ever under- 
took to corral. I have followed him no 
less than 500 miles, from one range to an- 
other. He has left the band and gone off 
by himself; and always when I get sight of 
him he is out of range, standing across on 
some peak, looking at me. 

"I have tried many long shots at him; 
have seen the snow fly, close to him, at 
times; but have never yet hit him. I have 
had to almost stand my old 40-90 Ballard 
on end to make it reach that far " (meaning 
he had to hold so high above the game). 

Finally, after the old man had been after 
this sheep 2 or 3 months, he wrote again: 

"Well, at last I've got the old Ellick! 

I've had a of a time following him. 

I've grown 20 years older, and my hair has 
turned white, on the trail of the old Turk. 
How did I get him, you ask? Well, it was 
this way: 

" I had been after him so long he seemed 
to have got disgusted with life — tired, poor, 
and pretty well worn out; so he did not 
travel so far, when I jumped him, as for- 
merly; but would sneak up among the 
highest peaks and glaciers and hide. So I 
was able to get closer to him. Still, I could 
get only a glimpse of him; then he would be 
out of sight again. The only time I could 
ever see him standing was when he was safe 
across some great canyon, out of range. 
Then, as long as I would stand and look at 
him, he would not move; but the minute 
I undertook to make a sneak, or to back 
track, so as to make a circle, he was off. 
Then, when I got over near where I had 
seen him, he would be back on some other 
peak, near where I started from, looking 
for me to come up where he had been. 

" Well, I got gray headed thinking how 
I could fool him. My partner hunted with 
me several days. Then he got disgusted 
and quit; for when 2 of us hunted, this old 



ram would keep right on the jump and 
would travel clear out of the country with- 
out stopping; never giving us a chance to 
make a sneak on him. 

" Finally one day, after I had travelled 
about 20 miles after him, always to see him 
just out of range, I was plumb worn out, 
and had about made up my mind to quit 
him. I was away' up on a peak, sitting on 
a rock taking a smoke and looking at old- 
Ellick. (I had named him ' Smart Ellick.') 
He was across on another peak, as usual,, 
about 500 yards away, looking at me and 
taking a nip of grass or moss, once in 
awhile; but all the time keeping his weather 
eye on me. 

" We had now got well acquainted and 
often entertained each other in this way. 
We had some nice social visits, at long 
range, but the ram was always very atten- 
tive. While I would rest and smoke, he 
would eat brush. When I got ready to go r 
he was always ready. 

" Well, as I said, I was lying on the 
rock smoking and watching old Ellick. .1 
noticed that when I would make a move,, 
even to take off my cap, he would notice 
it; and a thought struck me. ■ Now El- 
lick,' I said, ' I will just fool you once, for 
luck!' So I took out my hunting knife, 
cut a limb, made a cross piece and planted 
it on the rock. Then I took off my old 
blouse and my fur cap, and dressed up' 
my scarecrow, keeping carefully behind it 
meanwhile. 

" Then I rolled off the rock backward, 
out of sight, leaving old Ellick looking at 
my old cap and wondering, I suppose, what 
in the dickens I was doing. I went down 
the hog back, out of sight; got the wind 
in my favor, made a circuit and came up 
within 75 yards of old Ellick, and for the 
first time found him where I had left him. 

" I have killed bear as big as a covered 
wagon, and never was excited; but when I 
saw that old ram there, watching the old 
coat, I was plum rattled. I could not have 




4. 



A RECORD HEAD? 
Circumference of horn, i8i inches ; length of horn, 52?} inches. 



hit a buck Indian at 10 yards. All I could 
do was to lie there, like a tenderfoot, all out 
of breath, with just my eyebrows showing 
above the rocks. 

" I lay there what seemed to me 3 days, 
watching that old duck, with my heart 
thumping like a woman's. I wish you 
could have seen the old cuss. The ex- 
pressions on his face were a curiosity. 
Sometimes he looked as if he were afraid. 
Then again he looked mad, and seemed to 
be frowning about something. Then he 
would get impatient. He wanted me to 
come on, I guess. Again he would take a 
good, long, steady gaze, as if saying, ' what 
in the is the matter with that tender- 
foot? Has he gone to sleep? Or is that 
really he? He has not moved for 2 hours. 
He must be dead.' 

" I was worse scared than a squaw. T was 
afraid to shoot, now that I had a chance, 
for fear I should miss him, and for the first 
time in my life I wished for one of those 
guns that has a reaction business, full of 
cartridges. I would not have cared if the 

thing did blow up, so I killed my 

sheep. 

" Well, I finally got my second wind. 
The old Turk was getting uneasy, as though 
he had about made up his mind it was not 



I over there. I slid the old crowbar 
quietly, inch by inch, up over the rock, and 
put the stock in the middle of my breast. 
I was lying fiat on my belly, and could not 
move my shoulder or raise above 2 rocks 
I was wedged into. It was an awkward po- 
sition to shoot in, but I dare not move. I 
got the sights lined up on his right 
shoulder, and before I pulled I looked sev- 
eral times to be sure I was right. Then I 
let her go. 

" When that old crowbar went off she 
almost made a consumptive out of me, by 
crushing in my chest. I was so wedged in 
that for a minute or 2 I could not get up, 
nor see anything: but when I finally pulled 
myself out. old Ellick was there all right. 
He was kind of pushing around, but was 
hit in the right place, and did not need any 
more. 

" I went up to him and said, ' Well, old 
pard; you took me for a tenderfoot did 
you? And you got left. I put up a cold 
deck on you I know, and played you a 
crooked game, but I can't climb over these 
hills all winter for nothing. I have got to 
have a grub stake and Sheard is offering a 
big price for horns like yours.' 

" I tried to excuse myself for playing 
such a dirty mean trick on the old cuss; 



12 



RECREA TIOJY. 



but it was no use. I felt as if I had slipped 
up and shot a squaw in the back. When I 
looked him in the face, as he lay there with 
his big eyes staring at me, he seemed to say, 
' Old pard, I never thought you would take 
a mean advantage of me, like that.' 

" And I tell you, now, I felt worse than 
a horse thief. I would have given a whole 
lot if I could have had that shot back. It 
seemed as if I had killed an old partner of 
mine, for his money. I have killed lots of 



buck Indians, and never cared about them, 
but am superstitious, and should be afraid 
•to use the money this head would bring, 
after all; so I shall not sell it unless I get 
broke and need money, bad." 

Four years later this man was killed in a 
snow slide, and Sheard bought the head 
from his partner. The horns measure 18^2 
inches in circumference, and 52^2 inches in 
length, around the outside of the curve. 



MY TWENTY-TWO POINT BUCK. 



F. D. HULBURT, M.D. 



My youth was spent where game was 
plenty; so at an early age, a fondness for 
hunting was acquired. Many happy days 
were passed in rambling through ravines 
and over hills. Even now I recall the feel- 
ing of pride with which I would return 
home with my quarry, the result of a long 
and toilsome tramp through the woods 
with the old muzzle-loading gun. The time 
finally came, however, when I must leave 
the farm, with its pleasures, to pursue my 
studies in a distant city. The old gun and 
its accoutrements fell into other hands and 
I have never seen them since. Although 
actively engaged since I left the old home 
and farm, I have never quite succeeded in 
ridding, myself of an occasional desire for 
an outing in the woods — a longing for the 
favorite pastime of my boyhood days. 

In response to this feeling, in October, 
1896, I arranged for a few days' absence in 
the Northern pine-lands, for a deer hunt. 
The men with whom I had intended to go, 
went at a time when I could not leave, and 
were in a place not easily accessible without 
the loss of valuable time. The open season 
for deer would soon expire, so I decided to 
strike out alone for a hunting-ground that 
could be reached in the shortest time. 

I arrived at Solon springs, October 28, 
and at once made inquiries for a guide. 
I found none, however, for they were all 
out hunting. I was a stranger there, but 
the station agent finally came to my rescue. 
Sixteen miles from town, he told me, a 
half-breed lived in a good game country. 
I might secure accommodations there. 

Acting on this hint, and being willing to 
undergo almost any hardship for a few 
days' good hunting, I began at once tp look 
for a man to take me out. After some de- 
lay, one was found. We arrived at the half- 
breed's about 4 p.m. The house, made of 
poles covered with bark, was in a wild for- 
est region, near the bank of a stream. 

As we approached the dwelling, women 
and children appeared at the door, with 
evident surprise. The mistress told me her 
husband was not at home and would not 



return until night. She was reluctant about 
taking me as a boarder, offering no en- 
couragement to my entreaties. I was con- 
fident, however, that as soon as the man 
should return, it would be all right. 

Not wishing to waste any time in getting 




"A FAWN HAD BEEN CAPTURED BY ONE 
OF THE GIRLS, AND WAS THE PET OF 
THE WHOLE FAMILY.' 

located, I told the teamster to unload my 
baggage, and return to town. After getting 
permission to take my trunk into the house, 
I unpacked it. The woman and daughters 
crowded about to see what it contained. 
Besides my rifle and hunting outfit, I had 
brought along a liberal supply of tea, coffee, 
sugar, dried fruit and canned goods. As 
these were taken out, it soon became evi- 
dent I was winning the good graces of my 
new acquaintances. They tasted the tea 
and sugar, sampled the prunes, and with 
evident delight carefully examined each 
package. 

At dusk the half-breed returned. For a 



MY TWENTY-TWO POINT BUCK 



13 



short time he was sullen and disposed to act 
ill-tempered at my intrusion. I [e soon mel- 
lowed, however, and became social, finally 
assuring me 1 would be welcome as long 
as I wished to stay. He told me I should 
find fair hunting" in the locality; deer were 
often seen near his house. He would he 
busy for a day or two, but in case I were 
unsuccessful, he would go out with me. 
He cautioned me not to go too far away, 
saying, " Stranger easy get lost here." 

During the evening my host entertained 
me by relating Indian legends, tales of ad- 
venture, and incidents of hunting life. 
When bed-time came, deer-skins and 
blankets were spread out on the floor. I 
was assigned a place at one end of the small 
one-roomed shanty. I had my own blank- 
ets, and after rolling up in them, an- 
nounced myself ready for sleep. The others 
soon went to bed. A fawn had been cap- 
tured by one of the girls early in the sum- 
mer, and it was the pet of the whole family. 
The little animal was tame, and at evening 
was let into the house. It would then nestle 
down close to some member of the family 
for the night. 

As we all lay stretched out on the floor, 
I no longer regarded myself as an intruder, 
but felt I had really been adopted into the 
family. 

We were up by daybreak. After break- 
fast, I started into the woods. I traveled 
Northward, finally reaching a well-worn 
game-trail. This I slowly followed, winding 
through the dense forest, until nearly a 
mile from the cabin. After ascending a 
small hill, I sat down on a log, near the 
trail, to watch for game. 

The morning was lowering and gloomy. 
In a short time rain began to fall, and I 
shifted my position to the sheltering boughs 
of a balsam. The wind moaned through 
the treetops, sending a melancholy wail 
over the land, and the scattering drops of 
rain fell through the overhanging boughs. 
As I sat there in meditation, a tall dead 
tree, that had withstood the blasts of many 
years, but which was now weakened with 
decay, toppled over, and fell with a crash. 
A deer, startled by the noise, sprang from 
its bed near by, and came bounding toward 
me. It was a buck with a fine set of horns. 

So nearly was his course toward me, that 
for a moment I wondered if he were not 
mad, and was really charging me. When 
he reached the foot of the hill — less than 60 
yards away — the old fellow stopped under 
cover of a small hemlock tree, turned partly 
around and looked back, as if to see what 
had alarmed him. 

Now was my chance; but my heart was 
beating sledge-hammer strokes. Slowly the 
rifle came up, and as the front sight showed 
against the shoulder of the deer, my finger 
pulled convulsively. The buck went down 
with the report. After making a few frantic 
efforts to rise, he rolled over. The 300- 




"THE TROPHY IS A GREAT ATTRACTION 
TO MY LITTLE SON." 

grain bullet had entered the shoulder, pass- 
ing out at the base of the neck, on the op- 
posite side. 

Although I regarded my success as being 
due more to good luck than to skill, I could 
not but feel pleased; for my buck was the 
largest I had ever seen. The antlers were 
exceptionally well-developed, having in all, 
including the anterior projections at base of 
horns, 22 points. 

I finally succeeded in hanging my deer 
on a bent sapling. After disembowelling 
him, I started to return. The rain had now 
changed to sleet and snow. When I reached 
the cabin, the half-breed had also come in. 

Late in the afternoon, despite the weath- 
er, we went out with a pony and brought in 
my buck. I now began to think of home, 
for I was satisfied to quit. A bargain was 
made with the half-breed to take me to the 
station. Early the next morning the ponies 
were hitched up, and with baggage and 
buck we rode to town. Arriving at the 
station, I at once weighed the deer — 287 
pounds, the scales showed. The head was 
then shipped for mounting. 

The trophy is a great attraction to my lit- 
tle son, who occasionally takes an imagi- 
nary deer hunt on his father's lap. 

For those whose tastes turn toward the 
chase, it is hoped that the picture of the 
mounted head will revive old memories. It 
may serve to recall pleasant associations 
and fond recollections of some camp-fire 
long since gone out; or to render more 
vivid the reminiscences of a pleasant out- 
ing in grand old forest regions, where nat- 
ure charmed and hearts were free from 
care. 



THE MUST DAY OF THE CHICKEN SEASON 



A. B. (<>\V IK. 



The persistent whir of my alarm clock 
finally brought me to a proper realization 
that it was the morning of the long awaited 
day— the tst of the chicken season in Min- 
nesota. I had been elected to awaken the 
other members of our party, to get them 
on the road by 4 o'clock. There were 4 of 
ns: the Mayor and the Postmaster, 2 vet- 
eran chicken slayers; the Doctor and I, 
both young and green at the business. 

A mist was falling when I got out of the 
house, which gave me great joy; for I had 
heard that something of this kind was 
needed to make it easier for the dogs, on 
the 1st day. After I had awakened the 
veterans, I went to the depot to meet the 
Doctor, who was to come on the 3.20 train 
from St. Paul. The train was an hour 
late. 

During that hour, I received more abuse, 
and was threatened with more kinds of 
deaths than ever mortal was before; and 
all because I asked an operator a few ques- 
tions, and got 2 sleepy hunters up a few 
times to see that it was clearing. It finally 
did clear; the train came and we started; 
the Postmaster and the Doctor, with the 
former's Irish setter, Pat, in one rig, and 
the Mayor and I, with his Irish setter, 
Crank, and his pointer, Teddy, in the other. 

The slaughter was to take place on the 
great flats, as they are called, between 
Rothsay and the Red River of the North. 
We had just reached the Eastern margin of 
the flats when one of the dogs, ranging 
ahead, showed signs of game. In an in- 
stant the veterans were out and following 
their dogs closely. Soon a chicken rose, 
almost out of range. The Postmaster tried 
one charge from his repeater, but never 
touched it. I saw the Mayor smile, as the 
bird sailed away. He told me, on the way 
■out, he did not like to hunt with the man 
with the repeater on the 1st day, because 
" the cuss always shoots as well on the 1st 
day as the last; while I can't hit anything." 
That was why he smiled at the miss. 

We were all out now. A few stray birds 
got up, and it was my turn to smile when 
the Doctor missed an easy shot. We soon 
decided this was not the kind of hunting 
we were looking for, so moved on. Soon 
we came to one of the " very places." It 
was a swale covered with green grass, while 
on either side was a narrow strip of wheat 
stubble. The Postmaster and Doc followed 
one strip; the Mayor and I the other. 
After going some distance, Ted took a 



hack tack and located a small covey. My 

fat companion got 1 bird, and 1 tried to 

get another, but failed. 

The other hunters were now ahead of 
us, coming up on our side of the swale. 
When they were within about 40 rods, Pat 
found a scattered covey. To their disgust 
and our amusement, the gunner-, wasted 
several charges without getting a feather. 
We saw them look curiously at each other 
and then move on carelessly in our direc- 
tion. Suddenly a bird got up between, them 
and flew toward their rig. Doc raised his 
slaying machine and was about to fire, but 
hesitated for fear of shooting the horse. 
The Postmaster, however, was getting des- 
perate, so blazed away, missing the bird, 
but hitting the horse. The animal was too 
far away to be injured, but near enough to 
be well stung. He wheeled around, nearly 
upsetting the buggy, and started for home 
at a brisk trot. His owner took after him, 
yelling: " Whoa, whoa," in a voice that 
would have stopped a coyote. 

Fortunately, a haystack was right in the 
line of flight, and the animal decided to 
sample the hay before going farther. He 
had cause to regret this, or the run, or 
something else, for he was treated to 
a sound flogging when the irate Post- 
master caught him. We drove down to 
congratulate the Doctor on his skill in 
sending so many charges of shot into the 
air, and were making it generally pleasant 
for him, when our friend returned with his 
horse. We showered congratulations on 
him, also, for his good shot and his big 
game; but he did not seem to appreciate it. 

To our surprise, a bird got up within 2 
rods of one of the rigs. By some accident 
my gun went off and the bird dropped. 
Then our fun commenced. The Mayor 
and I each had a bird, and the other boys 
not a feather. We made it interesting for 
them for a while, giving all kinds of advice; 
which they tried to laugh away. 

They finally left us, and we did not see 
them again until the noon roundup. Then 
we found they had nearly as many birds as 
we, and were therefore inclined to be so- 
ciable again. 

Though the chicken crop was light, we 
returned in the evening with 2j birds in one 
rig and 24 in the other. The Doctor was 
happy because he had beaten me by 1. 
Now, when we want to make the Post- 
master very tired, we ask him if he ever 
shot any large game. 















"V f, \WA 




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.- . . " ■_...■ . ,. ' 2. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY F. E. MATHEVVSON. 



A FRIENDLY HAND. 

Winner of Eighth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 
Photo made with a Universal Camera, fitted with a Baush and Lomb lens, on a Cramer plate. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY H. L. CHRISTY, 



AT THE FOOT OF THE PASS. 

Winner of Ninth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

16 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY SEKGT. WM. H. VAN UUSKIRK. 

WE'RE HUNGRY. 

Winner of Fifteenth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY SERGT. WM. H. VAN BUSKIRK. 

BREAKFAST FOR SIX. 
Winner of Twelfth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

»7 




TREED. 



COPYRIGHT, 1897, BY WRIGHT & CARLIN. 



GOOSE SIIOOTINd IN COLORADO. 



W. E. KINO. 



Colorado affords as fine a field for the 
lover of sport with the gun, as any part of 
the country. Geese, ducks and other kinds 
of feathered game are plenty; though of 
course the range of wild fowl is limited. 

Now 1 have a friend who is a thorough 
sportsman and a fine shot; and when we 
heard of a field, some 12 miles from town, 
where the Canada geese were accustomed 
to feed, we determined to bag a few. They 
came in from the South Platte river every 
morning; so we laid our plans accordingly. 
We left the town of Sterling at 2 o'clock 
one afternoon for the ranch of a friend, 
near the feeding ground of the geese. 



coming up from the West, right over 
us. 

Rising quickly, we turned our gun-, loo 
After the rattle of smokeless powder was 
over, we gathered 3 birds. One struck 200 
yards away. 

The large flock, unsuspicious of danger 
before, turned at our shots, lighting with 
the 2 out on the prairie. We had to wait 
only a few minutes when we had another 
shot, this time bringing down 4 birds. 

The flock from which we killed these 
also joined the geese on the prairie. 

I suggested going out and flushing them, 
for they would go back to the river; but 




BY COURTESY OF "THE PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER. 

THE LARGE FLOCK TURNED AT OUR SHOTS." 
From a Painting by Chas. A. Zimmerman. 



On our way down we killed 11 ducks — 
brown-heads and mallards. Arriving at the 
ranch, we put up for the night. 

The next morning we made an early start 
for the stubble field, reaching it by day- 
light. My companion placed the decoys, 
30 in number; while I gathered weeds and 
straw to make a blind. This was built in 
an irrigating ditch near the middle of the 
field. Before our blind was finished, 2 
geese were seen coming. Of course they 
saw us and turned while well out of range; 
but lit some distance away on the prairie. 

The blind and decoys were hardly ar- 
ranged when we saw a large flock outlined 
against the Eastern sky. Yes, they were 
coming toward our field. We hugged the 
ground closer and lay securely hidden, lis- 
tening to their loud and familiar " honks." 
In a few minutes they would be in range. 
Suddenly we were surprised by 6 geese 



later in the morning would probably return 
to the field. I scared them up, and had 
barely returned to the blind when we saw 
3 birds coming directly to the decoys. Of 
these we got one each. The 3d, frightened 
and squawking, came circling around, try- 
ing to locate its companions. Within easy 
range we fired a volley that almost made 
the ground tremble; but every shot was a 
clean miss. The frightened bird, shaking 
its tail as if bidding us a long farewell, made 
its way safely back to the river. 

We remained in the field until 10 o'clock, 
but the first flocks did not come back. As 
the flight was over, I started to gather up 
the decoys and birds, while my friend went 
for his buggy to haul them in. We did not 
care to pack such a load to the ranch. 

With 9 geese and 11 ducks, we were satis- 
fied to start homeward. On reaching 
Cedar creek, we gathered in 5 more brown- 



J 9 



20 



RECREA T10N. 



head ducks. All considered, we were well 
satisfied with our trip. 

We both used Dupont smokeless powder 
with number I shot for geese, and 5's for 
ducks. My companion shot a Greener, 
while I used a repeater. 



When the geese were dressed, we found 
some of them had been hit with as high as 
13 shot, many going through the bodies. 
This speaks well for the penetration secured 
with smokeless powder. 



A GOOD INDIAN. 



NELSON YARNALL. 



Chief Washakie was born in the Flathead 
valley, Montana. His mother was a Flat- 
head, but ihis father belonged to the Sho- 
shones. The old chief has always been 
reticent about his age. 

" The Indian," he would say, " has no 
means of keeping the snows that have gone, 
as the white man has. My years have gone 
with the snows." 

However, judging from his early asso- 
ciations with the once famous guide and 
scout, " Jim " Bridger, he was probably 
born about the year 1810. 

Of his earliest recollections, he says: 
" The first white man's money I ever had 
I earned when a young man, herding ponies 
for a party of trappers. I worked for those 
men one snow and until the water was high. 
Then they started in the direction of the ris- 
ing sun. They said they would return when 
the leaves began to fall. I agreed to meet 
them at the place where we parted. 

" My father tried to persuade me not to 
go with the white men again; but my first 
experience with them was so pleasant I had 
determined to go. I had learned to eat the 
white men's bread, and drink their coffee, 
which I liked very much. Then they had 
promised to bring me a gun. 

" The trappers returned and I met them 
at the place appointed, which was on the 
Green river. They brought my gun; and 
I liked them so well I promised them 
never to go on the war path against white 
men, and to try to prevent my people from 
doing so. This promise I have always 
kept. 

" The trappers also brought a lot of 
beads, needles, thread, calico, paint, pow- 
der, caps, and a few guns, to trade with the 
Shoshones. Most of the work I did that 
winter was to bring in parties to trade with 
the trappers. This I liked very much, as I 
had a good gun, and the trappers had given 
me a pony to ride and one to pack. 

" When I told my people how good my 
new friends were, some of them, who had 
never seen a white man, visited the trappers 
with me." 

It seems the Indians looked upon Wash- 
akie as a leader, even when he was a young 
man. From this time he made war against 
other Indians — principally the Blackfeet 



and Grosventres. He says, in connection 
with his first attempts at war: 

" I had a good gun, and all the young 
men of my tribe followed me, because I 
could shoot farther than they." 




CHIEF WASHAKIE. 
From a photograph kindly loaned by Mr. Chas. F. Fish. 

In speaking of the trappers again, he said: 
" When they went away and returned 
again, there came with them a young man, 
about my age, who could ride and shoot 
well. We were soon good friends, and 
were together most all the time. He loaned 



THE REMET>Y. 



21 



me traps, and showed me how to set them 
for beaver." 

This young man was Bridger. Wash- 
akie's friendship for him was deep and last- 
ing. He still carries his old friend's photo- 
graph, on a cord about his neck. 

The young chief's time was divided be- 
tween acting as agent for the trappers, and 
in making war against the Blackfeet and 
Grosventres. This continued until about 
1850. 

" I was camped with part of my tribe on 
the Sweet Water," he said, in recalling this 
time, " when Bridger, with a party of white 
men, came to my camp. He asked me to 
go to Fort Laramie. The white men wished 
me to sign a treaty of peace with the whites, 
and with all other tribes of Indians. I was 
not then head chief, but was made so the 
next day. Yellow Hand, who was then 
head chief, refused to go with Bridger, but 
I, being anxious to make a treaty, decided 
to go. 

" On the following morning, I rode 
through the village, telling the Shoshones 
what I intended to do, and asking them to 
follow me. Then with Bridger I started in 
the direction of Laramie. Before night 
nearly the whole village had overtaken me, 
and I was declared their chief. This pleased 
Bridger's party so well, they made me and 
each member of my family a present of a 
blanket. 

" When we reached Laramie, I found a 
great many men, all dressed alike; when 
they stood up in a row they all looked alike. 
Bridger told me these were the fighting 
men, and were called soldiers. He said the 
noise they made with the yellow horns was 
a sort of language, by which they received 
orders while fighting. They belonged to 
the great father at Washington. This great- 
ly impressed me; I had never before seen a 
soldier. 

" There were many Indians also: Sioux, 
Cheyennes, Arapahoes, Crows, Grosven- 
tres, Blackfeet, Utes, and others. The 
good things on the wagon train, Bridger 
had told about, had not arrived.- After 
waiting a few days, we moved down the 
Platte river until we met the train. Then 
all went into camp, and the good things 
were unloaded on the orairie, and divided 
among the different tribes of Indians." 

Washakie's surprise at this display shows 
how little the Indians then knew about the 
Government. 

" We had no idea," he said, " that the 
great father at Washington was rich enough 
to load a whole train of wagons with good 
things and send it so far to meet us! 

" After the things were divided, the head 



men of all the tribes, with Bridger and his 
party, signed a treaty of peace never to tight 
among themselves, against the great father, 
nor his people. The big council then broke 
up, and all the tribes went back to their own 
countries." 

It is Washakie's proudest boast that out 
of all the Indians who signed the treaty, he 
is the only one who never afterward raised 
his hand against a white man. 

Washakie has done good service for the 
Government, and has always been a strong 
ally of our soldiers. He fought with them 
against the Arapahoes in 1874, and again 
with General Crook against the Sioux and 
Cheyennes in 1876. His counsel was sought 
in troublesome times and his advice always 
respected. 

While encamped on Goose creek with 
General Crook's army, in 1876, a council 
was called by the General. Washakie's ad- 
vice was asked as to the best manner to at- 
tack the Sioux, who were then encamped 
on the Little Bighorn. After looking over 
the General's army, Washakie frankly said: 
" My friend, you are not strong enough to 
fight the Sioux that are now collected to- 
gether. You may brush them off for a 
time, as you would mosquitoes, but they 
will keep returning until they devour you. 
I advise you to send for more soldiers." 

A council was called, and while sitting in 
the same place, on the following day, 3 men 
rode up with a report of the Custer mas- 
sacre. 

" Ah, I told you yesterday you were not 
strong enough to fight the Sioux," said 
the old chief to the General. " Had you 
been there you would have gone as they 
did." 

Washakie's advice to other Indians dur- 
ing the last troubles with the Sioux, when 
all the Indians were crazed with " ghost 
dances," probably saved the country from 
a terrible war. Runners were constantly 
arriving from all the Western tribes; from 
the Southern Arapahoes, Comanches and 
Kiowas, trying to induce the Shoshones 
to join in the war. The chief's advice to 
them was always the same: " Go back to 
your country; go to work, and try to 
make a living. I long ago made a treaty of 
peace with the white people, and I shall 
keep it while I live." 

If the Shoshones had listened to the run- 
ners and joined the Sioux, the Utes, Ban- 
nocks, Arapahoes, Crows and others would 
have followed. 

As the old chief is now growing feeble, 
it would be a kind act of a grateful Govern- 
ment to provide for him during his few re- 
maining years. 




jWas one biiAt smmer 

.JWeSQl' beside tin nVeif 8 
[With. our fi5fcpto/e<cuwt <mr bait 

, £l £r V x $ dltinpt at catAid 

fc <Sk«fi^lwd f>rrae msteaci of fi$fc 
D^et Smile^ ife? used for bait'' 
nna on Thftt 5iiWnw Jnorutno**^ 
1 iiea rlj met tnu fate , w 

US True she nearly Caught 

JlJ^"© JJ£aj*tffui5h koK 
p&l l^iiKe.mnu other mh 
,At1a?£~fi5ipedl ofLJief iT 



THE RENTED IJICVCLE SUIT. 



WALTKR I. SHAY. 



" Let's take a spin down the gulch, as far 
as the junction and come home on the 
train." said my friend Walters, as we sat 
in front of his shop, one afternoon last 
summer. 

*' Just the thing," I assented. 

" Well, let's start as soon as we can get 
ready," he continued, " because," with an 
expressive wink, " we might have to stop 
for repairs, and it would never do to miss 
the train." I fully understood what he 
meant by stopping for repairs. Widow 
Schaefer's ranch is about half way between 
Martinsville and the junction, and the wid- 
ow's eldest daughter, Kate, would be the 
cause of the probable stop for repairs. 

" All right," I answered, " I will have my 
wheel here in 15 minutes." 

At the appointed time I was back, with 
my wheel, but Walt w r as ready and waiting 
for me. He is a favorite with the fair sex, 
and on this afternoon, clad in a new bicycle 
suit, he would have made a first class pict- 
ure for a bicycle ad. 

Away we went, and a most delightful 
ride lay before us! Martinsville is a mining 
camp, in the heart of the Rocky mountains. 
It is 15 miles, by rail, to the junction; but 
by the wagon road which, for the most part 
is excellent, the distance is but 5. 

As we passed the last saloon, in the lower 
end of the town, and got on the grade I 
noticed a 4 horse team hitched to a wagon 
with an empty hayrack, standing beside the 
road. 

Old Ford is inside, investing the pro- 
ceeds of his hay in stomach tonics," I re- 
marked. But, just at that moment, Walt 
was busily engaged in guiding his wheel 
with one hand, using the other hand in 
tipping his hat to a lady acquaintance. 

" Great riding, isn't it? " he said, as with 
our feet on the coasters, a firm grip on the 
handle bars, and sitting well back, we be- 
gan to skim down the grade at an increased 
speed. 

" Indeed, it is great," I answered, and, 
putting one foot between the front fork 
and the tire, I began to slacken up our in- 
creasing pace. 

Ah, fellow wheelmen, that was what you 
would call riding. On either side of us 
rose the lofty walls of the canyon; up, up, 
like majestic sentinels, while before us 
spread the grade like a huge anaconda, now 
dipping, now turning; and far ahead the 
smiling little valley spread out like a huge 
painting, with a back-ground of gold. 
" Click, clack, click, clack," said our cy- 
clometers. " Burr, burr," echoed the rap- 
idly revolving pedals, while our easy, 
breezy, motion was one a lark might envy. 



" Let us slacken our pace a little." said 
Walt, " we're nearly to the saw-mill turn." 

The road for the next 2 miles was graded 
into the mountain side; while on the lower 
side it was a sheer drop of 30 feet to the 
little mountain stream that was dashing 
merrily along the bottom of the gulch. We 
slowed down, and had just made the short 
turn, when I heard a rumbling in our rear. 
Walt must have heard it too, for he re- 
marked that old Ford must be coming 
along behind. 

" Well, he must have got a decided move 
on those horses," I said, " for we have not 
been losing any time ourselves, and we 
passed him back at John's saloon." 

But heavens! That rumbling was draw- 
ing nearer, with lightning rapidity. We 
looked back, and, horrors! What a sight 
met our astonished gaze. Just turning the 
short bend, 4 infuriated horses were bound- 
ing down the grade like fiends and behind 
them the wagon and the great, empty hay- 
rack were swaying and tossing from side to 
side, while the noise it all made was like 
the roar of the Yellowstone falls. 

" What's to be done? " we both cried at 
once. There was but one thing to be done, 
and that was to go. The team was so 
close to us it would have been next to im- 
possible to slacken our pace, and jump. 
Besides, what good would it have done to 
have jumped off the whee 1 s? The bank on 
the upper side was at least 10 feet, straight 
up, and it would have been madness to at- 
tempt to jump down that 30 foot grade into 
the stream below. 

Acting with one impulse, we took our 
feet off the coasters and caught the pedals. 

" Hit them hard, as long as you can hold 
them," I yelled, " and then let her coast for 
all she cost." 

We pumped as hard and as fast as we 
could; then again got our teet on the coast- 
ers and away down the grade shot our 
wheels, while behind us, coming like a cy- 
clone, were those crazed horses hitched to 
that great wagon. 

Talk about your Tarn O'Shanters! The 
gait we made, in that awful race, would 
have left him at the post. We were cutting 
through space like a cannon ball, yet that 
awful avalanche of horse flesh, iron and 
wood seemed to be gaining on us. For the 
next mile or so. the grade was of the same 
character as where we started the race; 
now dipping a little, now turning a little, 
but not one single place where we could 
turn out. Great God! I thought: if we 
were to meet a team or a band of cattle! 
But my thoughts on this line were cut short 
in my efforts to keep my flying steed of 




'FOUR INFURIATED HORSES WERE BOUNDING DOWN THE GRADE LIKE FIENDS. 



THE RENTED JUCYCJJi SLUT. 



2 5 



steel under control. I glanced across at 
Walt. His set face had the right look in it. 
That awful clatter, clangor, rumble, rumble, 
sounded as loud as ever. And how we did 
go! Every now and then we broke just a 
trifle, just enough to keep our wheels under 
control; while the banks, the grade, and 
the gulch bottom seemed like one rapidly 
revolving blur. 

We finally passed the last bad turn, and 
I hoped the hayrack would tip there, for I 
had not seen old Ford on the seat. The 
road from here on was not so dangerous 
though the grade was equally stiff. " I 
don't wish old Ford any ill luck, but I hope 
that old concern will go into the river," 
yelled Walt, through his clenched teeth. 
But old Ford was not' on, as we found out 
later. The team had started of their own 
accord, and the brake was knocked off the 
first jump they made. 

" Stay with her," I yelled back, for my 
oiled Victor had been forging ahead of 
Walt till I was now 15 or 20 feet in the lead. 

" If we have good luck until we get to the 
forks, we are all right." We knew once we 
were at the forks, we could turn on to the 
old wood road and let the team go on down 
the grade. But now the water in my eyes 
began to trouble me. It " was coming out 
in chunks," as Walt expressed it afterward. 
This awful clip was telling on us, and we 
were now within a half mile of the forks. 

" Slack up a trifle before you get to the 
forks," yelled Walt, " or you can't make the 
turn." " All right," I answered. 

Recreation came very near not getting 
this story; or at least not from my pen, for 
Crash! went my front wheel against a rock 
that had rolled down from the bank. Like 
a streak of forked lightning, my wheel 
darted from side to side, but with an intui- 
tion that we find often comes to us, quicker 
than thought, I had her righted again. I 
recovered my breath and looked over at the 
front wheel, but could see nothing wrong. 
Walt was up even with me again. 

" A narrow escape," I muttered, more to 
myself than to Walt. 

" I would call it a close shave," said he. 
The forks of the roads were in sight now, 
and we slackened up. 

" I don't think I hear the team," said 
Walt. " Neither do I," was my answer. 
The fork was just ahead of us, and now we 
had slowed down to something like an or- 
dinary fast clip. 

" Thank goodness! " I said to myself, as 
I made the turn from the grade to the wood 
road. Walt was just making the turn. His 
foot went farther into the front fork than 
he expected, and up went his rear wheel 
like the subsequent end of a circus horse. 
Over and over went rider and wheel, land- 
ing high and dry on the soft bank of the 
wood road. By this time, I had dis- 
mounted, and was just starting to his as- 
sistance, when he untangled himself, and 



dragging his wheel after him clambered up 
the bank to the wood road. 

" Well, that was a hot ride, I'll swear," 
were his first words; and, perspiring like 
stokers on a steam-boat, we sat down on a 
log. Then, when we found we were out of 
danger we breathed naturally. 

" I agree with you," said I; "it was cer- 
tainly pretty warm the first mile or two." 

' The horses must have taken a tumble 
or they would have been along before this," 
said Walt. 

Regaining our composure, we examined 
our wheels. A piece the size of a lead pen- 
cil was stripped from my front rim, the 
result of my collision with the stray rock. 
But the wheel was as solid as before. Walt 
was not hurt; neither was his wheel, but 
there was a rent in the seat of his trousers, 
as large as your hand. I was about to tell 
him of it when a happy thought struck me. 
I would be revenged for his joke on me at 
the last lodge dance. 

Finally the team showed up — coming at 
a slow walk. They had rounded all the 
turns safely, had run out their fright and 
were now simply going home. We pulled 
them out of the road and tied them up to 
await the coming of old Ford. Then I 
said: 

" Come on, let's be moving," and away 
we went down the grade again, but with a 
far more comfortable feeling than before. 

In a few minutes we were out of the 
gulch and at the widow Schaefer's. Invited 
to a seat on the front porch, a large, cool 
glass of milk, a chat about the runaway, 
and in the pleasant company of the young 
ladies time flew rapidly. Finally we arose, 
much refreshed, to continue our ride to the 
junction. 

As Walt, with a polite tip of his cap, 
started down the path to the gate, for the 
first time the ladies noticed the rent in his 
trousers. 

" Mr. Walters," said Miss Kate, " do you 
know that — that you might catch cold by 
having your clothing ventilated too freely? 
Goodbye," and with a mischievous laugh 
she disappeared in the house. 

" I wonder what Miss Kate meant by 
ventilated clothing," said Walt. 

" I am sure I could not say," I answered 
innocently, and changing the conversation 
he soon forgot her remark. The coasting 
part of our journey was now over, but for 
all that, we made excellent time, and ar- 
rived at the junction on the dot. Deposit- 
ing our wheels in the baggage car, we 
sauntered into the local coach. Only a few 
passengers were aboard, and all these were 
Martinsville people. Fortunately we were 
all acquainted, and after a genial and gen- 
eral conversation about our trip, in which 
I did not forget to tell of Walt's fall, we 
were nearly home before we realized we 
had started. 
Just before reaching Martinsville, I 



26 



RECREA TION. 



turned the conversation to Walt's new bi- 
cycle suit. 

" Did you say you wished a glass of 
water, Miss Dunne? " I remarked to one of 
the young ladies, who, by the way, was one 
of Walt's friends. Before she could reply, 
Walt, who sat nearest the aisle, gallantly 
rose from his seat, and started up the car 
to the water tank, leaving the rent very 
much in evidence, to my extreme delight. 

Returning with the water, he could not 
comprehend the meaning of the half con- 
cealed merriment. 

" Yes, I bought this suit because I liked 
the color so well," remarked Walt. 



' You bought it, you say? " asked Miss 
Dunne, with a smile, as she took the prof- 
fered glass of water. 

" Why, certainly," answered the smiling 
but embarrassed young man. " How did 
you suppose I got it? " 

" Well," said she, " judging by appear- 
ances, I — I thought you must have rented 

a." 

" Martinsville! " yelled the brakeman, 
sticking his head in the door. And Walt 
never knew what she meant by a rented suit 
until he reached home and changed his 
clothes. 




UMATEl'R PHOTO BY MRS. H. 



"WHY DON'T YOU SHOOT!" 
Winner of Tenth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 



MY LAST HUNT IX KANSAS. 



GEN. F. \V. BENTEEN. 



During the winter and spring of 1871, I 
was stationed, as a Captain of the 7th U. 
S. Cavalry, at Fort Hays, Kansas. From 
there we were ordered across to the forks 
of the Solomon river; for the settlers in that 
part of the State had been somewhat un- 
necessarily stampeded. 

On onr first buffalo hunt, when en route 
to give the settlers surcease from imaginary 
sorrow. 1 shot, while running alongside of 
her, a fat buffalo cow. After getting the 
carcass ready to put into the wagon, it was 



On arriving at onr destination, we 
learned exactly what we were satisfied of 
before leaving the post: there were no live- 
Indians in that section of country. Never- 
theless, the folks were glad to have the 
cavalry around. To render assurance 
doubly sure, I had the forks thoroughly 
scouted; then started homeward by the 
route most generally taken by hostile Ind- 
ians going Northward. 

No Indian signs were seen save the dead 
fellows in the crotches of trees. These had 




CATLIN, THE ARTIST, SHOOTING BUFFALOES. 



found that the bullet from my revolver had 
gone through the animal and the forefoot 
of an exceedingly fine Russian mastiff. I 
had not noticed the dog running at the side 
of the cow. As his color was just that of a 
buffalo calf, this was not at all strange. 
With a piece of old shelter-tent and some 
grease from an axle, we bound the mastiff's 
foot, gave him a drink of water from our 
canteens, and laid him with care alongside 
the buffalo, in the wagon. 

A few miles from that scene, our dogs 
started an immense wildcat and drove it 
into one of the ponds, which in springtime 
abound on the plains. The cat was such a 
vigorous fellow we shot him — not caring 
to have any more of our dogs hurt. 



become good Indians, and had started on 
the journey to the happy hunting grounds. 

In the Saline river valley we ran into a 
band of not less than 400 elk. Such a 
time as we had running them down and 
shooting them from horseback, does not 
occur very often in one's lifetime. Our 
wagons, which had been pretty nearly emp- 
tied of supplies, were now about packed 
with the finest and fattest of buffalo, elk and 
antelope meat. None of it was to be wasted, 
for, as we were nearing the station, it 
would be divided among our less fortunate 
companions in arms, the infantry. They 
had fewer opportunities than we to add to 
their larder. 

The last day, while approaching the line 



28 



RECREA TION. 



of the Kansas Pacific railroad, I was out in 
front, hunting a " divide " along which the 
wagon train might easily roll, when I 
dropped into a bunch of antelopes. With 
my revolver I broke the left fore leg of the 
patriarch buck; which about knocked him 
out, as I thought. Not having another shot 
left, he could not be dispatched. I could 
easily ride him down, and with a sabre 
could have killed him; but could by no 
means get my horse sufficiently near to 
knock him in the head with the butt of my 
pistol. When the buck was well enough 
rested, off he would go, I after him. At 
length my orderly came up, but neither had 
he a round of ammunition. As the dogs 
had chased the wildcat into a pond, so we 
chased the antelope. Then he was seized 
by the horns, drawn out, and his throat 
cut. He was left by the pond for the wagon 
to pick up. 

I wanted to get to the railway that night, 
to leave only a short march for the next 



day to our station. By the time the road 
was reached it was dark; however, there 
was plenty of water in ponds, and grass 
was abundant. There were piles of ties 
along the railway, and with these we soon 
had a signal-fire going for the train of 
wagons. All of them, with the troops, were 
soon in camp. 

The next morning I was somewhat dis- 
gusted to find in the pool that supplied us 
with water, a decomposed antelope. If you 
think such a " find " upset the even tenor 
of my way in any resoect, you do not know 
the kind of stuff an American cavalryman's 
stomach is made of. 

I know but one officer of the cavalry who 
is a survivor of that trip; and he, poor fel- 
low, never knew anything of the glory of 
the chase. At least he was the only one 
the decomposed antelope affected; and that 
may have been to get a pull at our pocket- 
flasks — something he did not keep for 
himself. 




RADIOGRAPH OF WALL-EYED PIKE, IMMEDIATELY AFTER BEING TAKEN FROM THE 

WATER, BY WM. SCHUTTE. 




RADIOGRAPH OF AN EEL, BY WM. SCHUTTE. 



HEROIC FISHING. 



29 



HEROIC FISHING. 

For a number of years parties fishing for 
cod. near the Isles of Shoals, have hooked 
halibut of enormous size and several times 
these huge fish have been brought to the 
surface after a struggle of considerable 
length; but until last summer no one had 
succeeded in landing one. The principal 
trouble seemed to be that the teeth of the 
fish chafed the snood off; though some- 
times the line itself was parted in the first 
mad rush of the halibut for liberty. 



of the Oceanic Hotel, and it was here the 
halibut was caught. The boat was one of 
the regular fishing boats of the fleet con- 
nected with the hotels, about 30 feet over 
all and well adapted to deep sea fishing. 

The line used was a new and extra large 
cod line, 60 fathoms long. The depth of 
water at Little Ledge is 30 fathoms and 
Mr. Ilsley's halibut ran out the whole 
length of the line 5 times before he gave 
up the struggle. 

This is said to be the largest edible fish 
ever caught on a hand line. 




HALIBUT. 

Weight, 356 pounds. Caught at Isles of Shoals, N. H., Aug. 18, iS 



For several successive seasons Mr. G. L. 
Ilsley and his cousin, Mr. - C. H. Merrill, 
had tried to bring in a halibut, and while 
they had no difficulty in hooking them 
they could not succeed in landing one. 

After one or 2 unsuccessful attempts, in 
the early part of the season, Mr. Ilsley de- 
cided to try a wire snood. 

His first attempt was an entire success, 
and after an hour's fight he had the satis- 
faction of seeing the magnificent halibut, 
shown in the cut, alongside the boat. After 
the skipper had despatched the fish, it was 
hoisted aboard. It weighed 356 pounds 
and was ;8 feet long. The picture repre- 
sents Mrrllsley and the skipper, Joe Hook- 
er, standing beside the great fish. 

Little Ledge is the name of the favorite 
fishing grounds patronized by the guests 



A few days later, Messrs. J. D. and D. N. 
Green, with similar tackle, landed a halibut 
weighing 270 pounds, with same skipper 
and at same place. 

J. K. Manning and Dudley Hall captured 
the third and last of the season. Its weight 
was 221 pounds. 

Great interest was aroused in the sport, 
and some of the best known fishermen in 
the country have signified their intention 
of trying their skill with these monsters of 
the deep, during the coming season. As a 
sport halibut fishing equals tarpon fishing. 



When the wife goes chasing bargains, 
Hubby wouldn't grudge the pelf, 

If she'd only buy such misfits 
As she hankers for herself. 



THE COWBOY'S VERSION OF THE PRODIGAL SOX 



It was at the Camp Fire Club. We had 
had our beefsteak and coffee, and story 
telling was in order. Captain Jack, the 
" Poet Scout," was introduced, and, among 
other choice bits of Western oratory, gave 
us this : 

More than 40 cowboys had gathered, 
from every direction, to hear Poney Bill, 
the only sinner-herder on the range " jerk 
his jaw on pious talk," as one of the boys 
expressed it. After the cowboy quartette 
had sung " Rock of Ages " and " Nearer, 
my God, to Thee " Poney Bill read a se- 
lection from the Prodigal Son, and then 
said: 

" Boys, it makes my heart dance and 
cavort around as joyful as a spring calf on 
a June mornin' to see so many of ye here 
to-day. It don't mean that because I'm the 
only sinner-herder on the range you put me 
up "for a curiosity and sail in here, from all 
quarters, to take in the percedens, like you 
would a circus. No, it don't mean that. 
Well, then what does it mean? It means 
that you've bin thinkin' over matters an' 
hev come to the conclusion that it are 
foolish to hang on to the ranges of sin 
while the pastures of the good Lord is 
afore ye, invitin' ye to come in and feed to 
your fill on the never failin' feed of right- 
eousness. 

" Boys, the Bible story I just read to ye 
is a touchin' one; and one that I hope has 
corkscrewed its way into your hearts. 
Here we see a young feller, a mere kid, 
possessin' all the comforts of a happy home. 
He had kind, indulgent parents ; wore 
nobby clothes ; was a fav'rit in society; 
in fact, he had everything the heart could 
long for, an' yet he was dissatisfied. 

" His wild broncho spirit wouldn't be 
curbed by the bit of wisdom, and by some 
hocus pocus he made a successful play on 
the old man and induced him to whack up 
his share of the boodle, ahead of the sot 
time, and to let him go forth to see the 
world. We next hear of the kid in the gay 
palaces of sin, blowin' in his dust like a 
thoroughbred and paintin' everything red. 
Every day he stuffs his pale hide with 
booze, and every night he goes to bed a 
whoopin'. 

" Women whose eyes is like the light of 
the sunbeams, but whose hearts is as black 
as the night, caresses him and sings to him 
the song of the Syrens: while they sips the 
costliest wine and eats the daintiest grub, 
for which Prod's called on to put up the 
boodle. He soon goes dead broke on this 
racket, and then wdiat's the result? His 
good clothes is in soak; his diamonds is 
in soak; and his late angelic companions 
is smilin' at his greenness and lookin' out 
for another sucker. And the once petted 



darlin' of the East is ekin' out a miserable 
existence herdin' hogs on a Jonah ranch, 
and afoot at that. 

" Boys, jest close your eyes for a minute 

and take in the picter of that poor boy. 
It's to be supposed the outfit hed run short 
of grub allowance and that Prod was 50 
hungry he'd 'a bin glad to get down and 
rastle shucks with the hogs ef he'd bin built 
for chewin' that kind o' truck; but he 
wasn't. As he sits thar on the corral fence 
he begins to take stock of his condition, 
and he ses, sorta talkin' to hisself, like: 

' Thar's lots o' room at the old home 
ranch. Thar's lots o' grub in the cellar, 
and dead oodles o' cash in the treasury. 1 
can stand in with all this agin if I'll jest 
make a bold play, an' ask to be taken back 
— not as a son, but as an ordinary hired 
man, at reasonable wages.' ' 

May be the old man would run him in 
for vagrancy; or set the dogs on him; or 
meet him with an armful o' clubs; but it 
didn't matter. The spirit of the Lord was 
a workin' in Prod's soul and he finally giv' 
the hog ranch the shake and lit out for the 
ole homestead. 

" When he was a long ways off the old 
man happened to be out lookin' after the 
stock and he saw a figure approachin' 
acrost the prairie, He shaded his ol' eyes 
with his hands as he said, ' Thar comes 
some poor, sore footed wanderer. Mebbe 
he's lookin' for a place to lay his head and 
somethin' to satisfy his hunger. God knows 
but my boy may be in the same fix to-day. 
an' — an' — Why! that looks like my boy. 
He's got my boy's gait; he swings his 
hands jest like him, an' — Why! 'tis my 
boy! ' 

" Did the ole man pick up an armful o' 
clubs; or call the dogs; or think up a lot o' 
cuss words to hurl at the approachin' prod- 
igal? No. The Good Book tells us, he 
met him with arms wide open. He hugged 
him till he saw stars; an' he kissed him; 
and then he tuck him in the house, togged 
him out in store clothes and yelled to one 
o' his herders to round up a bunch o' cattle, 
corral 'em; cut out the fattest calf in the 
outfit and kill it quick; for says he, ' We're 
goin' to have the grandest jubilee blowout 
of the season. The lost has bin found and 
the w r ild, reckless boy that was dead is alive 
agin.' 

" And boys, that was the grandest night 
that was ever spent around that old home 
ranch. 

" Now, boys, do you know you are a lot 
of fool prods? An' the first thing you 
knows the devil will get a rope on to ye: 
your feet will be snatched from under ye: 
he'll put his pitch fork brand into ye. and 
throw ye into a corner, where the temper- 



31 



3 2 



RECREA TION. 



ature would knock the tar out of the thick- 
est hided burro. The devil's got his herd- 
ers out, all the time, a lookin' up stray 
stock and runnin' 'em towards the corral of 
perdition. 

" Some times you see 'em behind the 
bars of saloons, and they'll meet ye with a 
good natured friendliness a shootin' out o' 
their eyes. Sometimes you see 'em behind 
the green covered gamblin' table, wearin' 
good clothes and big diamonds; but they're 
all herders o' Satan, an' you fool maverick 
cowboys knows it jest as well as I do; for 
you've all bin thar, en so have I. But 
thank God, a rider from the big home ranch 



above got a rope on me — a rope o' sal- 
vation — an' he put on my soul the brand o 
the Redeemer. 

" Now boys, why will ye waller in the 
mire o' sin while the pastures o' the good 
Lord is afore ye? 

" Why don't ye take stock o' your con- 
dition, as Prod did, and giv' the devil's den 
the shake; start for the home corral; an' 
never ease up on your gait, nor look back 
on the trail till you're on the glorious 
ranges o' Zion, luxuriatin' on the never 
failin' feed of righteousness and eternal life, 
and bearin' God's own brand, the holy 
brand o' the Cross." 



SPRING. 



W. T. JONES. 



And here you are, agin. 

Been floatin' round with Winter, 

You naughty thing. 

Purty tough 

To have snow, flyin' low, an' 

Teeth chatterin' so I couldn't 

Say Gee, or Haw. 

Hot enough now, you bet. 

Fact I never seed horses sweat 

Worse 'n they did yesterday. An' say! 

It was a caution the way 

They took me round that land, 

For 'bout an nour. I can stand 

Right smart, 

Of trampin' yit; 

But I must say for my part 

I was dern glad when they quit 

Their racin' and settled down 

To a steady gait. Plowin' 

Aint the easiest work 

For horses, anyhow. 

Right down to it, no chance to " shirk,' 

So when they fret 

And jog along, 'bout four 

Mile an hour, you get 

Somewhat riled, and swear 

I guess; leastwise 'taint fair 

To blame a feller if he does. 

'Bout the " trynist " thing 't ever was. 

And this is Spring, 

You old sweet thing. 

Blow cold or hot 

Tist like as not 

Fish '11 bite. 

So everything is jist all right 

I guess. And we'll forgit 



About the snow; and yit 
Only a week ago it quit. 

In writin' of this " owed " to Spring 

Perhaps I oughter try and ring 

In something 'bout bees, 

And birds, and leafy trees, 

And May apples, and sich; 

Like all good poets which 

Has the hankerin' for fame 

Would do. But I don't hanker 

Much as I used to. My sheet anker 

Aint 'zacly Spring nor Fall 

Nor June. But 'bout July, 

When bass is risin' to the fly 

And woodcock's loafin' along the river. 

Then we somehow diskiver 

That summer time 

'S good enough for us. 

Fact is we don't keer a cuss 

'Bout things we ust to; 

Sich as swings, and flyin' 

Jinnies, an' posies, an' tryin' 

To swing furder 'n any one; 

An' go in swimmin' Sunday; 

An' feel so ornry Monday 

Couldn't hoe, or plow, 

Or anything. Somehow 

I felt clean gone. 

But generally the blister on 

My back was on't for 'bout a week; 

" Suffered in silence " so to speak. 

Don't keer 'bout these things, I said; 

But lots o' other things 'bout as bad 

I do. And I'll gist say 

I aint 'zacly stuck on May, 

Or June, or Jinuary ; but I 

'M awful friendly tow'rds July. 



ONLY A DOG. 



A. W. DIMOCK. 



It is not expected that the Supreme 
Court of the United States will ever be 
found in the van of the Nation's march 
toward liberty and justice. Its traditions 
forbid. The Judicial department of this 
Government never gave birth to a Lincoln, 
nor construed a beneficent law in favor of 
freedom or humanity, when it could escape 
the necessity. 

But if it cannot join the procession, it 
ought to keep in sight of it, for in this land 
of law the Sceptre is in its hands, and in 
the words of the greatest of our race, 

" There thou might'st behold the great 
image of authority; 

A dog's obeyed in office." 

In a recent opinion written by Justice 
Brown, for the Supreme Court, in a case 
involving only a dog, it was held that dogs 
belong in the category of monkeys, cats, 
and parrots, and are not on the higher 
plane of horses, cattle, and sheep; that as 
dogs have no intrinsic value (unlike a Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court), their recogni- 
tion as property is entirely within the dis- 
cretion of the Legislature; that property in 
them is of a qualified nature, and regula- 
tions affecting them, which, if applied to 
domestic animals generally might be un- 
constitutional, are lawful, and the owner 
of a dog has no right to complain of them. 

Under this decision a dog or his owner 
has no right which any one is bound to 
respect. 

In classifying dogs with monkeys the 
court was oblivious of the obvious fact that 
the latter were created only as a joke. 

In antiquity the dog ranks at least with 
man. 

Fossil dogs have been found in great 
number. The monuments of Egypt bear 
witness to the race. Books and inscrip- 
tions prove that in the remotest historic 
periods dogs were as now; while the earli- 
est systems of pagan theology recognize 
them. 

Cuvier asserted that the dog was neces- 
sary to the establishment of human society, 
while other authorities allege that nations 
owe much of their elevation, above the* 
brute, to dogs. 

Herodotus records that in olden times, 
when a greyhound died, members of the 
family shaved their heads, and the dog was 
buried in consecrated ground; while death 
was the penalty for killing this dog. 

The memory of Walter Scott is en- 



shrined in his poem to " Bonny Heck," 
while the name of his " Maida " is linked 
with his own. 

Embodied in the literature of many 
lands, is the story of " Gelert." 

" And marbles storied with his praise 
Poor Gelert's bones protect." 

It is not alone in fiction that the dying 
eyes of the dog turn feebly toward his mas- 
ter and companion. His very name typifies 
affection, courage, and faithfulness. 

Life is possible, under the polar star, to 
the Esquimaux, because of his dog; while 
herds of cattle and flocks of sheep have 
been protected and cared for, by dogs, 
since before the star of the East shone over 
Bethlehem. The St. Bernards of the Alps 
have, for generations, struggled through 
the snow with their burdens of food and 
clothing, seeking the lost or bewildered 
traveler. 

There was cabled over the world an ac- 
count of the death of Bismarck's " Tyras," 
whose soul was released while struggling 
to save his master's property from the 
burning palace; and to-day that Prince 
finds consolation in the steadfast faithful- 
ness of his Great Danes, for the coolness of 
the great German whom he had made, but 
whose gratitude was that of the " place ex- 
pectants " of the elder Walpole. It is as 
easy to imagine the Prince grinding a hand 
organ .as finding his consolation in the 
monkey with which Judge Brown classifies 
his pets. 

The story of the devotion of the dog to 
man involves the history of both races. He 
guards his cradle and he lays a broken 
heart upon his grave. Who shall criticise 
the man, who, having inspired the life-long 
devotion of a faithful dog, believes with 
Pope that 

" Admitted to that equal sky, 

His faithful dog shall bear him com- 
pany," 

to a country where a higher Court will re- 
view Judge Brown's decision and Judge 
Brown himself! 

What American citizen would not choose 
to sleep under the Adirondack sod. with 
the humanitarian fanatic of Harper's Ferry, 
rather than on the Supreme Bench with 
his namesake? 



33 



HOOVER'S RANCH. 

JAS. HANKS. 



Wishing to make the acquaintance of the 
stock men in the Judith Basin, Mont., I 
determined to drive from Armington to 
Lewistown, a distance of no miles; so I 
had Simon (nvy colored driver) hitch a 
pair of native horses to a light, open wagon, 
and, in company with my wife, set out one 
fine morning in September. The stage road 
through the basin is level and fine, running 
through the center of the valley, which is 
15 to 25 miles wide, with high mountains 
on either side. 

We drove to every ranch we came in 
sight of, and consequently saw little of 
the road. Game, such as grouse, sage hens, 
deer, antelope and wolves, was plentiful 
along the route, and having a 40-65 Win- 
chester, and a No. 10 shotgun, I had no 
trouble in keeping plenty of meat on hand. 
Often while talking to a cattle man, I would 
see a flock of grouse or a band of antelope, 
which would make me forget everything 
else, while they were in sight; whereupon 
the rancher would remark: 

" Why, if you like hunting, you ought to 
go and hunt up old Jakey Hoover." 

I heard, so often, that old Jakey could 
give me all the hunting I wanted, and all I 
wanted to write about, that I determined to 
find him. So, after we had made a pleasant 
and profitable trip, I told my wife that as 
she then had a good place to stay, I would 
take a week off and endeavor to pay old 
Jakey a visit. 

She remarked that she hadn't seen old 
Jakey for some time, and she believed she 
would go along. Some of the ranchmen 
told me they had met Jakey; others that 
they had not; but every one knew him as 
the boss hunter and the greatest " bar kill- 
er " in Montana. 

We drove up the Judith river to the Peck 
ranch, the last habitation of any kind up 
the stream. Here we stopped over night 
and got our final directions, and although 
Mr. Peck was confident we could not find 
the way, without a guide, we started. He 
told us we had to drive up the stream, 
crossing it every few rods, for about 20 
miles. Then, he said, if we looked sharp 
enough, we might see an old trail turning 
off to the right. This was old Jakey's 
trail. " But you'll not find it," was his 
parting salute. 

We traveled steadily till about 3 P. M., 
when we found a doubtful looking trail 
turning so sharply to the right, that it had 
the appearance of going back. We took it, 
secretly wishing it would lead us back to 
the Peck ranch. But no — it led us over a 
ridge, covered with stunted pines; thence 
down a ravine which grew deeper and deep- 



er till, in a few minutes, we were in a gulch 
barely wide enough for our wagon, the 
hubs nearly touching on either side and 
the walls rising, perpendicularly, a hun- 
dred feet high. It looked as if night were 
setting in; yet it was light enough to see 
great caves, under ledges, on either side; 
and in what little dirt and dust there was 
at the entrance, were plenty of bear tracks. 

Now I like sport, but the idea of being in 
such a plight, with a woman, and no help 
in time of need but a negro who was so 
scared I could nearly see his eyes from be- 
hind, was not the kind of sport I like. I 
expected every minute to get stuck in this 
narrow defile and to have to tear the wagon 
to pieces to turn around. My heart sank 
below zero when I saw, a short way ahead, 
what I took to be the end of this gulch; 
but it proved to be a sharp turn to the left, 
and where the wagon hub struck the corner, 
in turning, I saw some red paint on the 
rock which convinced me some other wag- 
on had been through. 

This was a great relief to my mind. A 
few rods farther we emerged from the 
gulch into the water — beautiful, cold, clear 
water. The stream is about 2 rods wide 
and 2 feet deep. After crossing it we were 
in Jakey Hoover's park, which is about ~%. 
of a mile wide by one mile long. It is 
completely surrounded by crags and peaks, 
on whose tops rest the fleeting clouds. We 
had entered this beautiful park by the only 
way accessible. A short drive brought us 
to Jakey's cabin. Several deer, some of 
which he had raised and others that had be- 
come tame from association, and from be- 
ing salted and protected, were grazing in 
the meadows. 

I saw a man at the door shading his eyes 
with his hand, and watching our approach. 
He looked about 35 or 40 years old; had 
long, dark hair, high forehead, was of 
medium height, and had pleasant, blue eyes. 
He was withal a kindly looking man, seem- 
ingly in the prime of life; yet I afterward 
learned he was 54 years old. He had lived 
in this beautiful place 22 years. 

I asked him if his name was Hoover, and, 
on being answered in the affirmative, I said 
he was the man I was looking for. I ex- 
plained my business and said I was there 
simply for a visit of a day or 2; whereupon 
he unbent with the movement of a steel 
trap; opened the door and gave us a wel- 
come that made us feel perfectly a\ home. 
His cabin stands by the stream, with a deer 
house back of it capable of sheltering 20 
or more deer. He leads water from a 
spring, by pipes, to his house; and such 
water is never found East of the mountains. 



34 



TROUTING ON THE THUNDER. 



35 



The floors are carpeted with the hides of 
deer, elk, bear, caribou and lions. 

We spent a week with him, during which 
time we had enough experience fishing, 
hunting deer, grizzlies, and lions to make 
a book. I often got tired and hungry, only 
to go home and cat in a manner that sur- 
prised myself. 

Space forbids my writing of old Jakey's 
mode of living. The meats at one particu- 
lar meal consisted of elk steak, deers' rigs 
boiled and stewed down, deers' brains, 
rolled in pulverized crackers and fried, and 
a large platter of mountain trout. These, 
with Jakey's coffee and biscuits, made, it 



seemed to me, a meal good enough for any 
one. 

This first visit to Jakey's ranch occurred 
in 1893, since which time I have made him 
several visits, spent many days with him on 
the trail, and many nights with him by the 
camp fire, of which I may write again. I 
hope to be in Hoover's park in the near 
future. If any of your readers wish to make 
a trip to the mountains, in quest of sport or 
health, I will gladly write them directions 
and letters of introduction that they may 
visit the prince of hunters and see, in the 
wonderful park, the wondrous beauty I 
cannot describe. 



TROUTING ON THE THUNDER. 



A. D. CURTIS. 



" De Veney comes with me to go fishing to-morrow. 
Get bait. Cook." 

Thus read a telegram received one day 
early in May. The bait was dug, the min- 
nows caught, the flies carefully looked 
over. In short every preparation was 
made for the first trout fishing trip of the 
season. 

The desire to get into a trout stream, 
that had been growing stronger every day, 
finally reached its head. The result was, 6 
Marinette (Wis.) members of the Wau- 
che-wense Rod and Gun club, with 2 Chi- 
cago Calumet club friends, alighted at 
noon, the 9th, at Ellis Junction. 

There we found 2 rigs backed up to the 
platform. The skiff, in sections, was stowed 
in the bottom of the heaviest wagon and a 
few minutes sufficed to pack everything 
carefully. The Joker gave the minnows a 
change of water and a few drops of brandy, 
which livened them up surprisingly. Then 
the start was made. 

The highest point in Wisconsin, eleva- 
tion 4,000 feet above Green bay, distant 23 
miles, was our destination — known "to the 
Indians as Wau-che-wense, and to the 
whites as Thunder mountain. The country 
had been "logged"; jack pine now being 
the prevailing timber until within a few 
miles of our fishing ground; there the vir- 
gin forest began. 

Camp was reached 2 hours before sunset, 
and rods were hastily rigged. Some of the 
party fished the North branch of the Thun- 
der, flowing merrily past camp. The rest, 
with the assistance of Wade, our lodge 
keeper — the greatest talker in the State — 
carried the sections of the boat up the 
mountain to the little lake half a mile from 
camp. Soon the bottoms and ends of the 
skiff were nailed to the sides, the tar boil- 
ing and ready to be applied, but no swab 



had been brought. Handkerchiefs were 
too valuable so far from the source of sup- 
ply, so 3 of us held Wade down while the 
Doctor skilfully amputated his trousers 
half way to the knees. The improvised 
swab, tied to a stick, did the work satis- 
factorily. 

It was too late to try for trout, so a bee 
line was taken through the woods for camp. 
Supper was awaiting the hungry crowd, 
and the trout, caught by the other members 
of the party, fried to a delicious crispness 
disappeared with astonishing rapidity; 80 
going down before the 9 appetites were 
appeased. Cigars and pipes were produced, 
and, lounging in the balmy evening air, 
stories were told of former exploits with 
rod and gun, and plans made for the mor- 
row. Wade talked and talked; but as he is 
left alone in the wilds for weeks at a time, 
some allowance was made. 

It was seemingly but a moment after 
crawling into our blankets, when his voice 
was heard again, but not an unwelcome 
sound; for it was: "Turn out boys; it's 
5 o'clock; a fine day for fishing and break- 
fast is most ready." The meal over, 2 of 
the party were driven 6 miles up stream to 
fish in the vicinity of an old logging camp; 
2 others went along to fish down stream; 
some went East a mile to fish the Handsaw 
creek; while I fished from the camp down 
stream. 

These waters have always been celebrated 
for excellent trout fishing. Both the North 
branch on which we were, and the South 
branch, about 5 miles away, are ideal 
streams. All kinds of fishing grounds can 
be found. Rapids are frequent, where the 
gamy trout respond to the cast with a 
savage rush. The wading is good, though 
the rocks are slippery and the pressure of 
water so strong one may be swept into a 



36 



RECREA TION. 



hole if not careful. The excitement of the 
fishing is great and chances are often taken, 
so amusing and chilly experiences are not 
infrequent. A pair of old trousers, with 
shoes joined at the ankles with a string, are 
the best outfit for hard and successful work. 
Hip boots are soon filled with water. The 
spawning grounds, usually the level places 
between the rapids in the shelter of over- 
hanging alders, abound in deep holes. Here 
it is necessary to work carefully along the 
bank and patiently try the different kinds 
of bait, to overcome the shyness of the big 
trout. Our minnows, kept hard and fresh 
by the method of packing, proved the right 
kind of bait, and tempted many trout, of 
94 to 1^2 pounds in weight, to their death. 

Old logging corduroy bridges are favor- 
ite retreats for the fish; but the angler must 
be careful not to let a shadow of even the 
rod flit above the still water, nor to jar the 
logs by a careless step. 

Cautiously creeping through the tall 
grass to these spots, you cast a fly or bait 
into the current. With a rush the line is 
pulled across the pool with a strength that 
bespeaks a big one. The utmost skill is 
needed to keep the fish from getting under 
the logs or into the willows. Back, forward 
and across goes the trout in its frantic en- 
deavor to release itself. The struggle may 
be long or short, but when a successful 
landing is made, a chuckle of satisfaction 
accompanies him into the creel. 

The hungry but successful anglers strag- 
gled into camp one by one; every creel full. 
Wade commenced to talk and clean fish, 
with the appearance of the first man, and 
he was kept busy for several hours. 

After dinner the fishermen lay around in 
the shade, each one telling of his biggest 
catch, and how it was done. 

One of the party, however, had not re- 
turned; probably not wanting to come 
back without a full catch, was the decision. 
He had not taken a lunch, but would likely 
roast a fish or two, and fill up on brook 
water. 

The most enthusiastic again started out 
at 4 o'clock, to fish the stream; while some 
went to the lake. A beautiful little lake it 
is, at the foot of a high hill, bordered on 
one side by rocky cliffs; on the other by 
hardwood timber that cast dark reflections 
in the deep water along the shore. The 
trout rose well, and our 5-ounce split- 
bamboo rods were tried to their utmost. 
The trout that had given up the creek for 



the cold spring lake, were gamy to the 
last rush. 

Wade paddled the boat, and, wonder of 
wonders, threats of a gag answered as well 
as the real thing. Not a sound was heard 
save the swish of the paddle and the sighing 
of the wind through the treetops, with an 
occasional exclamation as a good fish was 
hooked or landed. Twilight approached 
and the reflection of the trees became 
darker, the murmur of the wind grew to a 
weird roar, as one of the sudden storms of 
the mountain foretold its coming. 

The rumble of thunder was heard afar, 
and an exceptional day it would have been 
without it, on this mountain; for it is right- 
ly named. Probably from being daily ac- 
customed to it, the trout did not cease 
biting. The darker it grew, the more fre- 
quent were the exciting splashes, tugs and 
rushes, as the hungry fish, anxious for a last 
morsel before dark, savagely took the flies. 
Some jumped clear out of the water, taking 
them on the downward turn; some seized 
them on the upward rush; while a few 
were caught in the wrong end, as they 
struck at the flies with their tails. 

Of all my varied fishing experiences, this 
was the most peculiar. The roar of the 
wind on the mountain above, while the lake 
was comparatively calm; the deepening 
twilight; the excitement of the sport, all 
combined to make a lasting impression. 

This part of the outing was a decided 
success in the size of the catch. We went 
to camp lugging over 50 pounds of trout. 
Here we found the whole party assembled; 
the missing one having at last turned up in 
a very bedraggled and exhausted condi- 
tion. 

Having lost his way, he had, after travel- 
ing in a circle for several hours, forced him- 
self to think rationally. Then he took a bee 
line West by the sun until he struck the 
main Thunder. After that he worked his 
way up stream to camp. 

Every day was varied by different experi- 
ences. The .worries and cares of business 
were forgotten, and our lease of life length- 
ened accordingly. On the 4th day, as most 
of the men must return to civilization, 
preparations were made for the homeward 
journey. Before going, however, Wade 
was presented with several pairs of trousers, 
to recompense him for the abbreviation of 
his own. As we rumbled down the road, 
he talked until we were out of hearing, and 
for all we know, is talking yet. 



" When I'm reduced to my last dollar I 
go right out and spend it." 

" What good does that do? " 

" Nature abhors a vacuum — and it brings 
in money to burn, right off." 



MARK RAST ! 



S. T. KARNS. 



Within sight of the sand dunes of Long 
Island and Great South bay, are Smith's 
point, Middle ground and Barn flats. 
These, with places of lesser advantages are, 
because of the prevailing South or South- 
west winds, lee shores, and consequently 
feeding-grounds for myriads of ducks 
in autumn and winter, and shore birds in 
the late summer. From the first of July, 
shooting on Great South bay and Shinne- 
cock yields good bags of snipe; and the 
shooter who goes to Canoe Place inn, 
Lane's or Ackerly's, for a week, is abso- 
lutely certain of good sport, part of the 
time at least. 

With the ducks it is different. For punt 
shooting, arrangements should be made 
about io days ahead, and the date positively 
fixed; or it will be found, on arriving un- 
heralded, that every punter is engaged. 
Then comes the aggravation of hearing 
reports of more successful gunners, and 
seeing the puffs of smoke from their guns, 
away across the bay. In consequence, on 
your return to the city, you will stop at 
Fulton market and grimly " put up " for 
6 or 8 pairs of birds, to be sent to expectant 
friends. 

If the sport is to be battery shooting, the 
same preliminaries should be observed. 
You are expected on the evening train. 
The hack quickly takes the party, never 
more than 2, to Capt. Ackerly's cottage on 
the bay, for instance. There your supper, 
always duck predominating, is served; you 
uncivilize yourself, assume the duck shoot- 
er's habiliments, and are rowed out to the 
" cat." Then, off for Middle ground, where 
anchor is cast. 

Four o'clock strikes. After a hurried 
breakfast, the double battery and its 150 
decoys are anchored; the shooters gingerly 
flatten themselves in its coffin-like interior; 
and, with a parting, " They'll see you be- 
fore you see them, if you don't keep down," 
the sloop fills her sails and quickly disap- 
pears. You are left with a ^-inch plank 
and 12 feet of water under you; but 600 
pounds of lead for ballast, light canvas 
wings and anchors, fore and aft, hold the 
battery steady and safe. One's apprehen- 
sion of a watery grave and no ducks, grad- 
ually fades and expectancy reigns. Peer- 
ing Eastward, for, the wind being South- 
west, from that direction the flight should 
come, one sees from out the darkness, steal- 
ing softly up the horizon, a white mist, 
paling the twinkling lights. As Fire island 



grows dim and its flashes less bright, the 
white beach and the life-saving station as- 
sume shape. Finally a golden rim appears 
above the horizon. " Mark East! " and a 
few black spots appear. Then their wings 
are bowed, their feet drop, they tip up to 
settle among the decoys. " Spat! Spat! " 
and their careers are ended. The sport has 
commenced. 

Thus it continues till noon; doubles, sin- 
gles, flocks great and small; blue-bills, 
redheads, coots, shelldrakes, with an oc- 
casional mallard, brant or whistler. Some- 
times a file of geese will give additional 
excitement to the shooting. The Captain 
blows his horn and beats up, when the 
flight slackens, and we go aboard for din- 
ner. Shooting is resumed at 3 o'clock, and 
stopped at sundown. 

It must not be supposed that this is the 
rule. Many times the signs and weather 
will be favorable; but with the sun, the 
wind will often veer and spoil everything. 
Again, when the " rig " is out, the birds 
are found " using " Barn flat, and a change 
is imperative. At another time, from a 
moderate breeze the wind increases to a 
gale, and tin cup and sponge cannot keep 
the water down in the battery. It sweeps 
in at every plunge, and though the flight 
is fine, self preservation is supreme, so the 
sloop is reluctantly signalled. 

The greatest difficulty in battery shoot- 
ing is to keep warm; but it becomes un 
fait accompli if the following ideas as to 
outfit, the outcome of 30 years of shooting, 
are followed: 

A dark corduroy cap, with ear-laps; dog- 
skin coat, and mole-skin vest lined with 
paper — wind-proof. Mole-skin trousers, 
buttoning at the ankle; army brogans and 
2 pairs of long woolen stockings; good 
gloves; fleece-lined underclothes; and a 
piece of soap-stone, 12 inches square by 3 
inches thick, to be heated and kept in a 
padded cloth bag between the feet. A good 
marine glass and a small cushion complete 
the list. Eschew everything of rubber. 
Cut a finger hole in your right mitten, 
which should be large enough to pull on 
and off readily. 

No flask? Bad! worse than 3 degrees 
below zero! 

Given all these, with good gun and am- 
munition, and an ideal day, a man is dead 
indeed if his senses do not tingle at, " Mark 
East!" 



37 




°EY EV°LUTPN. 

FRANK E. PAGE. 



PAST. 

The piscatory devotee in happy days of yore, 
Never got his trappings from the Jin de siecle store ; 
But with his wetted jackknife he trimmed a fishing-pole, 
Just long enough to overreach the bull-head's farthest hole : 



PRESENT. 

How dif'rent from the forking twig is the modern woven 

creel, 
And the fastened slip-a-noose unlike the buzzing reel, 
And the homely bean-pole that the fisher used in lieu? 
From the modern work of art — the io-ounce split bamboo. 
Then he went 2,-jishing — never burdened with supplies, 
Now, he angles, has his waders, and a book of gorgeous flies, 
And too, he has a — has a — but need a person ask ? — 
For the feature of his outfit is a nobby, yum-yum flask. 

FUTURE. 

Year by year the fishing vogue is changing more and more, 

Tho' Ananias ever will be keeper of the score. 

Of one thing we are certain, the evolution brings 

A sense that fishing outfits are full of needless things. 




And as a sort of habit, or identifying mark, 

He carved in fancy letters his initials on the bark. 

Then he hied to pasture green, through which the river ran, 

With his nice fat angle-worms in an old tomato can. 



Of the changes promised, the one that's most benign, 
Enables one to catch his fish with neither hook nor line. 
So the angling artiste will have fewer traps to lug 
For his entire equipment will be carried In a jug. 




A HARD RIDE IN THE MOUNTAINS. 



J. G. T. 



At a little frontier garrison in the moun- 
tains of Oregon, where the long winter 
clays hung in cold monotony, we usually 
hailed any change of duty with pleasure; 
albeit the variation might be of a kind 
bringing only a grim delight. One snowy 

evening in January, Lieut. M put in an 

appearance at our post, bearing an order 
from headquarters, 359 miles away, for a 
court-martial to be convened at camp War- 
ner, still 140 miles farther on, across the 
wilds of Oregon. 

The detail named him, Lieut. R of 

our camp, and me as members, besides 
others at the camp beyond. The pros- 
pect was anything but pleasant, but the 
thought of meeting comrades whom we had 
not seen for months, easily reconciled us 
to the chilly ride. The quarter master fur- 
nished us transportation from his limited 
supply, which consisted of one rickety am- 
bulance drawn by 4 wagon mules, and a 
spring wagon for baggage, witnesses, and 
one prisoner to be tried. With this outfit 
we took our departure. Owing to our late 
start and the bad condition of the road, 
only 15 miles were made that day. Toward 
dusk a spanking team approached, and we 
were soon hailed by the cheery driver, 
Lieut. Charley Roe, of my regiment. His 
rig consisted of an open buggy drawn by 
4 handsome horses — his own property — 
gaily decked with sleigh bells. 

Having the same destination as our- 
selves, he was promptly invited to join our 
mess. The next morning Roe asked me to 
take a seat beside him for the rest of the 
journey. We in due time arrived at camp 
Warner. 

A few days finished the business of the 
court. Then we prepared for the journey 
home. As before, I was to ride with Roe. 
The wagon containing baggage and 4 sol- 
diers, witnesses and cook, was started some 
hours in advance. Roe and I left the post 
later; while the ambulance was to follow. 

We with the spanking team started in 
high spirits about noon. We were bowling 
along merrily, when, at a crossing of a 
creek in the narrow valley, Roe touched up 
the leaders. They being unaccustomed to 
the lash, sprang into the air. This started 
the wheelers and away they all went. 
Swerving at a bend in the road, the buggy 
was upset. Roe clung to the reins, and after 
a few desperate plunges, the horses became 
entangled; 2 were thrown and all came to 
a sudden stop. The buggy was badly 
broken, so we extricated the team, and re- 
turned to the garrison. Fortunately, as it 
might seem, though not so as it came about, 
the ambulance had not started. Into this 



we got; but Roe insisted on hitching on 
his team. All went well for about 6 miles, 
when we reached the summit of a hill with 
a long descent before us. The team started 
down, but strangely enough, Roe did not 
touch the brake till the wagon had such 
headway it was of no avail. The horses 
started on a mad gallop; the old ambulance 
swaying, bumping and jumping. About 
100 yards from the bottom of the hill, the 
road curved. Here the old trap, taking the 
outside rut, slid beautifully in the groove. 
This great effort at equilibrium exhausted 
its strength, and one tire parting, on a hind 
wheel, down we went. The horses were 
finally stopped within 50 yards of a gorge, 
that would soon have received us. 

There we were, in the snow, 8 miles from 
the friends we had just left, and 30 miles 
from our base of supplies. Our pride 
would not allow us to return after this 2nd 
disaster, nor would our condition permit 
our proceeding bareback. We concluded 
to bivouac and brace up against the gather- 
ing snow storm. The prisoner, who was 
by no means a criminal, showed his pluck 
by volunteering to go forward and bring 
back the wagon. Mounting a good horse, 
he set out. As it was sunset the next day 
when he returned, it can be imagined how 
we amused ourselves meantime, without 
blankets, food or stimulant, and the mer- 
cury at zero. 

After a short rest for the team that was 
brought to our rescue, we set out for a 
night's travel. We all bundled into the 
little vehicle, from which we soon bun- 
dled out; for it was impossible to make 
time with the snow 18 inches deep. All 
that night we trudged beside the wagon, 
alternating the belaboring of the mules, by 
lifting on the wheels. The horses had to 
be hitched in at intervals to relieve the 
mules. The whole night's journey was 
fraught with misery, which our chagrin 
augmented. 

We marched 30 miles the next day, and 25 
the following; our progress continually re- 
tarded by the deep snow. Sometimes it 
was a little distraction to watch the usual 
small band of hungry coyotes or little 
wolves, that followed close beside and be- 
hind us; coming so near at times that we 
could hear the hungry snap of their jaws. 

On the night of the second day we made 
camp in a cheerless hole called Buzzards 
canyon. The Westerner can always be re- 
lied on to give an euphonious title to a 
locality. Now, the next day would be the 
last day of the month; in fact, the last day 
of the 2 months; which means in military 



39 



4° 



RECREA TIOX 



parlance, muster day — or did. some years 
g 

Lieut. Roe being absent on leave, felt in 
duty bound to be present at the muster of 
his troop. It was the alternative of a fear- 
ful night ride, or a reported absence on the 
muster rolls. He chose the former. Se- 
lecting his 2 best horses, one to ride, the 
other to lead — tirst adjusting a fur robe on 
the back of one in lieu of saddle — he 
mounted and set out by the chilly light of 
a midwinter moon. The distance was 54 
measured miles, with the road merely a 
trail in places — hilly and covered deep with 
snow. The thermometer marked 12 below 
zero. 

We learned 2 days later, that Roe ar- 
rived in camp Harney, plucky, but badly 



frozen. He lost a bit of each ear, besides 
sustaining a general numbness which lasted 
him for 3 months. 

At his cabin door he was greeted by his 
mother, who had journeyed from her home 
on the Hudson to this secluded spot, to 
spend a winter with her son. 

He was the same officer who rode one 
horse the same distance — 140 miles — in 22 
hours, and without the slightest injury to 
man or horse. This on duty, however. 

When in the saddle, he always seemed 
infatuated; not with pleasure, but an ap- 
parent desire to go on and on. He is now 
Capt. Roe. of the crack Troop of Militia 
National Guards of New York — raised and 
equipped. I think, principally by his own 
efforts. 



RABBIT SHOOTING IX KANSAS. 



A. W. BITTIXG. 



From the time I learned to point my 
grandfather's old muzzle-loader in the di- 
rection of game. I have enjoyed hunting 
rabbits. While the sport may be thought 
rather mild by some, yet with a well trained 
dog — one that will set the rabbit and not 
run in — enjoyable shooting may be had. 
It takes a quick eye to stop a prohibition 
cottontail, scudding under full sail, on a 
Kansas prairie. 

One bright morning last December, my 
friend Whittier dropped in on me and sug- 
gested a day after bunnies. I: did not take 
long to get the light hunting-wagon loaded 
with tent and camp outfit. Then we were 
off for the Ninnescah river, some 20 miles 
South of Wichita. The roads were in ex- 
cellent condition, as Kansas roads gener- 
ally are, and we went bowling along at a 
lively gait, reaching our destination before 
noon. 

After the horses had been taken care of. 

we selected a sheltered nook in a small 

grove, on the South side of a steep bank. 

s :o be out of the North wind. We 

soon had camp in good shape. The stove 

s placed in position near the entrance of 
the tent; camp utensils arranged in order. 
and then we were ready for lunch. 

It is always my custom, when camping, 
whether for a day or a longer time, to put 
the camp into good shape the first thing. 
Then, in case of bad weather. I am ready 
for it. In this Western country, one gets to 
depend on his own resources, for there 
are no hotels scattered over the country. 

back Eas:": and settlers' homes 
not always convenient. The most satis- 
factory way. therefore, is to take a tent: 
for then you can stop whenever and wher- 



ever you please: and can go to bed with 
your boots on, if you wish. 

We had with us a pointer and a setter, 
both well broken on birds and rabbits: and 
when they made a stand, there was always 
business ahead. It was generally impossible 
to know whether the game was quail or 
rabbit. My friend and his pointer Sancho 
took one edge of a cornfield, while Bird 
and I followed the other. Before we had 
gone 50 yards, my dog came to a stand. 
Moving up. I gave him a gentle push. 
Away went a bunnie. bounding along until 
brought to grass with a load of 6's. 

Alternating between prairie and corn- 
fields, we repeated the same movements: 
the rabbits often coming to bag. some- 
times getting away. More escaped in the 
cornfields than on the prairie. Having all 
the rabbits we could easily carry, we re- 
turned to camp an hour before sundown. 

It was a beautiful evening, so we built a 
fire outside the tent, and put the kettle over 
the fire. While Whittier was stirring the 
mush. I prepared a generous supper of 
stewed bunnie and sweet potatoes. 

After the meal, we were ready for " swop- 
ping " the usual camp-fire stories of former 
hunting trips. While my companion was 
giving me a " whopper." we were joined 
by 2 lads from the neighborhood who had 
seen our fire and came to see " what was 
going on." They were pleasant boys and 
gave us some information about the game 
of the vicinity. The quiet of the evening 
was enlivened, occasionally, by the howl- 
ing of coyotes in the valley: otherwise 
everything was in repose. Feeling the 
need of rest ourselves, we sought our 
downy couch. 



SOME OLD Gt/NS. 



41 



We were awakened by a howling storm. 
It was wind, hail and snow. We rose with 
tin- dawn and alter a red hot breakfast, were 
again ready for business. Several inches 
of snow had fallen, and the trees and bushes 
were covered with the fleecy mantle. Here 
in sunny. Southern Kansas, one is not 
often greeted with such beautiful winter 
scenes. It brought to my mind similar 
ones in the Mast, in " auld lang syne." 

Pulling on our rubber hoots, we forded 
the river, to hunt among the wild plum 
hushes on the sand hills. We walked leis- 
urely and had an enjoyable half day's 
sport, bagging numerous rabbits and a few 
quails. 

My friend killed a large coyote, that un- 
wisely attempted to pass him, on his way 
to better cover. He had a beautiful coat, 
which now, as a rug, adorns my friend's 
hall. 

Until I have explained, it may be doubted 
that I got a rabbit up a tree. This, how- 
ever, actually occurred. Although we had 
agreed to shoot only running rabbits, I saw 
one at the foot of a small plum tree, some 
distance away; so thought to touch him 
up. At the report, the rabbit sprang 
straight into the air and landed, dead, in 
the fork of the tree, over 2 feet from the 
ground. Was not that treeing a rabbit? 



Could an Eastern sportsman have 
our camp, he would have exclaimed: 

"Game hogs!" Well, if the killing had 
been done in a locality where rabbits were 
less plentiful, the term might be justified. 

Rabbits have no protection here; indeed, 
they are so numerous and destructivi 
young orchards that the county paj 
bounty of 4 cents for every pair of • 
Even then they seem on the increase, espe 

cially jack rabbits; as they are not 
teemed much for the table and therefore 
little hunted. Good sport is had chasing 
jacks on horseback, with hounds. 

In recalling my hunting trips in Eastern 
Pennsylvania, several decades ago, 1 re- 
member many a weary tramp of miles, over 
hill and dale, with a result of perhaps 1 or 
2 rabbits and a squirrel or so. Yet, if the 
game-bag was light, the jaunts were happy 
ones for all that. 

At the conclusion of our hunt, and on 
our return to camp, I proposed a final 
lunch of broiled rabbit, but was ruled out 
by my friend, who had already had enough 
of that kind of fare. 

On account of the snow, the return trip 
was rather tiresome, but we finally got 
through. For years to come I shall think 
with pleasure of our day after bunnies, 
on the Ninnescah. 



SOME OLD GUNS. 



CAPT. PHILIP READE, U. S. A. 



EARLY FRENCH MILITARY BREECH- 
LOADER MOUSQUETOON. 

The Mousquetoon des Cent Gardes was 
invented in France. The order of introduc- 
tion of breech-loading arms, for military 
service, was as follows: 1. The United 
States Army. 2. Norway and Swedish 
Marine. 3. Prussia. 4. France. In his 
" Report of the Military Commission to 
Europe," 1855-56. Maj. A. Mordecai says 
that this " Cent Gardes " arm was destined 
for the special corps connected with the 
Emperor's Palace. The arm was of what, 
in 1856, was small calibre, being 0.36 inch. 
The ball was long in proportion to its 
diameter; powder charge 30 grains. The 
ball, powder and fulminate were contained 
in one cartridge, covered at the rear by a 
copper cap containing the priming. Mr. 
W. W. Greener states that the cartridge 
used was similar in construction to the Le- 
faucheux: that is, the pin fire cartridge. 
The last named authority states that the pin 
for the cap was placed " under the base of 
the cartridge and projected barely % of an 



inch." Greener also says the manipula- 
tion of this arm " was difficult and danger- 
ous." It will be observed that the 2 au- 
thorities quoted differ as to the priming 
system employed. 

Maj. Mordecai's report describes the 
Mousquetoon des Cent Gardes as having a 




SccrTy Tre*t*-% yTCtiftx.TLf23rc.cc7f 7oaflcr . 

breech-loading arrangement somewhat sim- 
ilar to the American Sharp's carbine. The 
carbine was finished with a slender sword 
bayonet, 40 inches long, with which it 
formed a lance 7 1 / feet long. I quote from 
Maj. Mordecai's report: 



42 



RECREA TION. 



" This breech-loading arrangement ap- 
pears to act well, as it may in an arm of so 
small a calibre and charge, used only under 
cover of a roof; but it would not seem to 
be adapted to use in the ordinary vicissi- 
tudes of military service. However, M. 
Pruille, chef d'escadron d'artillerie, proposes 
to make arms for the general service on 
the same plan: to use a very long grooved 
ball, weighing about 180 grains, with a 
charge equal to 31 grains. He says a ball 
of this kind penetrates, at 20 paces, through 
a cuirass which has been proved in the or- 
dinary manner: that it has a range of 650 
yards with an ordinary sight, and an ex- 
treme range of 2,186 yards." 

THE LEFAUCHEUX BREECH-LOADING SHOT 
GUN AND PIN FIRE CARTRIDGE. 

This non-military arm is illustrated here; 
1st, because Lefaueheux is stated to have 
been a workman under the celebrated Jean 
Samuel Pauly, just as Jean Nicholas 
Dreyse, the alleged inventor of the Prussian 
needle gun, had been. 2d, because the 
sporting arm of Lefaueheux was one of the 
first fire arms of any kind, " drop down " 
system, to use'a gas-tight cartridge shell, or 
case, to properly fit the breech of the gun: 
the cartridge carrying the means of its own 
ignition. The first Lefaueheux gun used a 
pin-fire cartridge, which is shown in the 
illustration. After this comes the rim-fire 
cartridge; then the centre-fire metallic 
cartridge. The pin-fire cartridge of Le- 
faueheux required a pin-hole in the breech 
part of the gun for the brass striking pin 
to stick up through, acting as a nipple for 
the cock or hammer. This pin hole was a 
great objection, as the pin had to fit into 
the notch in the barrels before the barrels 
could be closed. In very rapid loading, and 
during excitement, delay was caused in 
properly fitting the cartridge. The liability 
of the pins to be bent out of shape, or dis- 
placed, was also an objection. The Lefau- 
eheux cartridges were not handy to carry 
on account of the projecting pin. Yet the 
introduction of the central fire cartridge 



met with opposition from many who as- 
serted that the system was dangerous be- 
cause they could not see, at a glance, if 
the gun was loaded. The hammerless shot 
guns were opposed, 18 years afterward, 
on the same ground, with the further ob- 
jection that sportsmen could not see when 
they were cocked or loaded. Patented " in- 
dicators " followed but. were discarded as 
useless and unnecessary appendages. Some 
of Lefaucheux's pin-fire cartridges were of 
pasteboard, re-enforced with foil near me- 
tallic base. 

On page 102, " Hints to Riflemen," 1864, 
by H. W. S. Cleveland, is a sensible defence 




Ti&fa.U.cTttvcxTS ret-cft - tcxtclvi" . 3i^Te. ff^/o ., 



of cartridges loaded at factories and self-, 
primed. Even at that date, objections were 
urged by some who preferred muzzle load- 
ing arms and percussion caps, based on the 
ground that loaded cartridges were dan- 
gerous: that if the sportsman's or soldier's 
supply of such was exhausted his fire-arms 
were of no more value than so many sticks: 
that they could only be used with the spe- 
cial ammunition provided for them: that 
their use restricted the firer to precisely the 
same quantity and quality of powder and 
ball under all circumstances and at all 
ranges; that they encouraged waste of am- 
munition, carelessness, etc., etc. 

The success of breech-loading small arms 
is due in a great measure to the cartridge, 
in the improvement of which there has been 
the same advance as in the arms themselves. 
No matter how inferior may be a breech 
arrangement, a perfect cartridge can be 
used with safety and efficiency. 



TO A PICTURE. 



LAURENSTINE YORKE. 



New sorrows smite me from thine eyes 
And I am blanched and dumb; 

Hope, the alluring siren dies, 
And leaves me cold and numb. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



ON THE MOULEE MARSH. 

W. T. D. 

After being cooped up in an office all 
winter, I naturally enjoyed my ist outing 
of the season exceedingly. I do not be- 
lieve in spring shooting, though to get into 
the country, I usually spend at least one 
day on the marsh. I prefer the woods, not 
because of the woods, but for the action and 
the unexpected whir of a partridge or quail. 
To lie in wait for a duck, seen afar, coming 
dead on, is, to my mind, " too Indian." 

My friend and I left Trenton, and with 
a Northwest wind made the 8 miles to the 
marsh just below Huron river, in time for 
breakfast. No record of time was kept, but 
we could not have been 2 hours in making 
the trip. Our boat, a 16-foot open skiff, 
was old and heavy, but a good sailer, stiff 
in the water. 

After breakfast we walked down the 
beach and punted through the marsh, not 
trying to kill birds, but lazing around. 
Away back in the marsh were thousands of 
pintails, and although 2 or 3 miles away, 
we could hear them rise with a roar known 
well to duck hunters. 

The Moulee marsh is probably one of 
the best ducking-grounds in the country. 
Members of the club there kill hundreds 
of ducks in a day. It is said that Harvey 
Brown, of Cleveland, who is the best shot 
in the club, shoots 3 guns and kills with 
every barrel. I have heard of his getting 
28 teal out of one flock.* 

We killed more time than birds, but had 
a good time. Late in the evening we heard 
the birds coming into the marsh. An oc- 
casional mallard would fly over with a 
" quack, quack "; then we heard it repeated 
away back in the marsh. The teal would 
whiz by, disappearing in an instant. This 
kept up until long after dark. 

Many an evening, in the fall, have I spent 
in the marsh to catch the flight, when I 
shot so fast my gun barrels became too hot 
to touch. For half an hour it is good sport. 
When you are through you find you have 
killed, in the short half hour, enough mal- 
lards, grey and black ducks, to satisfy you. 

The next afternoon we started home in a 
gale. Three other hunters, who were at the 
marsh, came with us: one in our boat. 
We took in a lot of stuff that loaded us 
down, but being accustomed to wind and 
water we hoisted sail and flew before the 



wind. One was kept busy bailing. Several 
times, when the wind came too strong, we 
had to let the sail fly out in front, like a 
flag; even then we made great time. Once 
a big wave covered our bow, six inches. 
My friend was at the tiller and saw it com- 
ing. He was afraid one of us would see 
it and move; then all would be over, per- 
haps, with all of us. I had a few pails of 
water to bail out, as a result. Our next 
trouble was going through a bed of bowl- 
ders. I don't know how we got through 
and will not try to tell. 

We stopped at Story's bay and looked 
back for the other boat, but they were not 
in sight. For a time we were worried, but 
after a time we saw them coming and they 
were soon with us. We then held a council 
on the beach. 

" Now what shall we do? " said one. We 
had made only about 3 miles. 

" Let's go into Story's, leave our stuff 
and have him drive us to Trenton," I sug- 
gested. All agreed, and that was what we 
did. 

The gun that Story — an old market 
hunter — has is a murderous weapon. It is 
4 gauge, nearly 8 feet long, with a big pad 
on the stock. Story said he had killed 42 
ducks at one shot. His load was 12 ounces 
of shot — could shoot 14, but it kicked too 
much. From a boat, he would get in line 
with the ducks, rest the muzzle, hold the 
stock against him somewhere and let it go. 
The recoil would send the boat flying 
through the water and save him. I am 
thankful the law prohibits the use of such 
guns, now. 



* There are many club men who are also game hoes. 
Mr. Brown, if this report be true, may not squeal for his 
food nor put his feet in the trough when he eats, but he 
has all the other characteristics of a first-class hog.— 
Editor. 



FROM LAKE CHELAN. 

Trapping in this section last winter was 
not good. Several men were engaged in it, 
but no good catches were made. The coun- 
try about the lake has been trapped every 
winter, for the past 7 years, and marten 
are getting scarce. The Pearl brothers 
wintered in the Stehekin valley, at the head 
of the lake, and caught a few marten, a 
fisher or 2, several mink and 5 lynx. This 
last named catch is curious. In the winter 
of '88 a party of 4 trapped at Railroad creek 
and got 31 of these whiskered cats. A few 
years later one of the same men and I 
hunted and trapped there 2 winters. We 
got a large number of marten, some fishers, 
a dozen wolverines and a varied assortment 
of other fur; but only 1 lynx. Nor did 
any of the other hunters catch anything 
feline except an occasional bob cat. 
Lynxes have been caught in several local- 
ities, lately, and some people believe they 



43 



44 



RECREA TION. 



are like bears, in one respect — i.e., some 
years they will be seen and caught freely, 
and in others they apparently desert the 
same section altogether, or nearly so. Is 
the lynx inclined to be migratory in its 
habits? 

Mountain lions have been killing deer, 
to an unusual extent. During January and 
February several half-eaten carcasses were 
found, and I saw the remains of a large doe 
floating in the lake. She had been killed 
and partially devoured. This was evidently 
a lion's work. One of these had been stay- 
ing in the Stehekin valley for several win- 
ters, but Redmond Pearl saw it one day 
and wounded it, with his 38-40 Winchester. 
He then followed and killed it — a male, 7 
feet 10 inches long and weighing 131 
pounds, on a steelyard, just after being 
brought in. It was very fat, and is sup- 
posed to be the one that has been heard so 
often for 3 or 4 years past. 

Deer wintered well here and few were 
killed during the later winter months; but 
they are not so plentiful as formerly; nor 
are goats shot so often. Two men from 
Southern Oregon, came in lately, bringing 
4 large dogs with them. They have gone 
up Railroad creek after bear and intend 
hunting them all the spring. Hides are 
good until the middle of June, away up in 
the mountains. Trout are biting freely and 
some good catches have been made. Pros- 
pectors are preparing to go out now, in the 
hope that the new forest reserve order will 
be amended. Mining is the coming indus- 
try in Washington, and if the order stands 
as made, it will utterly ruin this country. 

C. Greenwood, 
Lake Chelan, Wash. 



WHERE THE BUFFALO WENT. 

Anaconda, Mont. 

Editor Recreation: In 1876 I was Gov- 
ernment scout under General Miles. Little 
did I think then that the immense herds of 
buffalo which were continually in sight, 
would so soon be swept off the earth. 

In September of that year, " Yellow- 
stone " Kelly, " Billy " Cross and I were 
sent by General Miles to locate the camp 
of the Ogallalah Sioux. We followed down 
the Yellowstone 50 miles, and about 10 
o'clock that night, found where their camp 
had been during the day. The next morn- 
ing we took a straight cut for Cedar creek, 
reaching it at dark, then travelled up 
stream 8 miles. Every half mile we ran 
into herds of buffalo. They were not wild, 
and at times it seemed certain they would 
run over us. It was a peculiar situation — 
hunting Indians and dodging buffalo. 

We camped in a thicket that night. In 
the morning, Miles' command was seen 



about 8 miles away, exchanging shots, at 
long range, with the Indians. Cross and I 
were for lying low until night; but Kelly 
insisted on taking daylight for it. So, with 
almost a certainty of being shot, we started 
for the command. 

The Indians had set fire to the prairie, 
and the smoke had shut off our view; but 
every time the wind lifted the screen, we 
got our bearings. Fortunately for us, the 
enemy had gone to the farther side of the 
command, leaving clear sailing for us. The 
Indians told Cross, afterward, they saw us, 
but through the smoke took us for Indians. 

When within 250 yards of the troops, we 
saw them sitting on a sidehill, resting. As 
the air was still smoky, they also took us 
for Indians, and fired volley after volley at 
us. The bullets rattled about like hail. We 
found shelter in a convenient washout un- 
til a sergeant, with a small detail, came 
down to scalp the dead. The soldiers were 
certain they had seen a number of Indians 
fall from their horses; but it was only us, 
as we tumbled to the ground, looking for 
holes in which to cache ourselves. 

From '76 to '82, on both sides of the 
Yellowstone, buffalo were slaughtered 
ruthlessly by whites and Indians. At every 
shipping point there were thousands of 
hides piled up. All that was saved of the 
animals were the hides and horns. The 
former averaged the hunter $2.50 each, 
while for the horns he got 1 cent a pound. 

In those days, from any prominence, 
10,000 buffalo might be seen " at one look." 
It was certainly a magnificent sight. The 
cattlemen wanted the buffalo exterminated, 
so the cattle could have thev grass. As no 
one interfered, the white hunters slaugh- 
tered, indiscriminately, male, female and 
young. 

One day, on the Redwater, 35 miles 
North of Glendive, I counted from a butte 
18 hunters, all shooting into different herds 
of buffalo, with their Sharps rifles. Yet 
people wonder how the buffalo could have 
been so quickly exterminated. 

In '83 there was practically but one herd 
left. That was between Moreau and Can- 
non Ball rivers, in North Dakota. There 
were about 10,000 animals in this herd. In 
September of that year, Sitting Bull, with 
his followers, went up the Cannon Ball, 
hunting. The 1st day they killed 1,100 — an 
average of 1 buffalo to each Indian. White 
hunters would 'have killed 20 to 60 in the 
same time. By the middle of the following 
November the herd was completely wiped 
out. From that month, the American bison 
was practically a thing of the past. 

Vic Smith. 



" Buttons used to cost $100 apiece." 
"Yes; men used to need more decora- 
tion than they do now." 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



45 



INDIANS ARE AMENABLE TO 
GAME LAWS. 

Some weeks ago the District Attorney 
at St. Paul, Minn., riled an opinion with 
the Game and Fish Commissioners of that 
State, to the effect that under existing 
treaties between the U. S. and the Chippe- 
wa Indians the latter have the right to hunt 
anywhere, and at any time, and that they 
are therefore not amenable to State game 
laws. 

I wrote Mr. S. F. Fullerton, Executive 
Agent of the Game and Fish Commission, 
referring to a case recently decided in the 
U. S. District Court, for the District of 
Wyoming, in which substantially this same 
question was involved, and Mr. Fullerton 
replies as follows: 

" I am very glad to be able to say to the 
readers of Recreation that the attorney 
general of our State, as also the chief jus- 
tice of our Supreme Court, has given us an 
opinion adverse to that of our district at- 
torney, and they say the Indians have no 
more rights than the white men have. 

" Of course we, as a commission, intend 
to keep on arresting the Indians, whenever 
we find them breaking the law, and we are 
glad the matter has been finally decided in 
the supreme court of Wyoming. I am also 
glad Recreation is of the opinion that the 
Wyoming case covers our case here in 
Minnesota. If this point had been decided 
otherwise than it has been, it would be one 
of the most vital blows at game protection 
that was ever dealt in Minnesota. If the 
Indians could hunt when and where they 
pleased then all our efforts at game preser- 
vation would be in vain; and I am glad to 
know such is not the case. 

" We have just passed our new game 
bill and think we now have a good law; in 
fact, one of the best in any State in the 
Union. The legislature has been very kind 
to us and has increased our appropriation 
from $15,000 to $25,000 a year. 

" Sentiment is growing in Minnesota in 
favor of game protection, as indicated by 
the action of our legislature in increasing 
our appropriation in these hard times. 
Recreation is doing splendid work along 
the same lines, and the Game and Fish 
Commission wishes it every success." 



I have read one of your charming books 
and buy your magazine, regularly, at the 
book store. Recreation is the best of its 
kind published. I am a lover of nature 
and my hobby is canoeing. I wish you 
would publish some articles about canoe 
outfits and complements. 

C. F. W., Cleveland, O. 

I should be only too glad to print such 
articles if some of my friends will write 
them. Editor. 



THE WOLF QUESTION. 

In future numbers Recreation purposes 
taking up the very serious question of 
wolf-extermination in the ranching coun- 
try. 

As nearly as can be ascertained, the 
region chiefly concerned at present is Wy- 
oming, Eastern Colorado, Eastern Mon- 
tana and Western Dakota. 

The damage done in one year by a single 
gray wolf has been variously estimated by 
ranchmen at $50 to $500. 

If the lowest estimate is correct it would 
pay the Government to offer a $25 or even 
a $50 bounty for each wolf scalp. But it is 
one matter to go wolfing and another to 
kill wolves. 

Of the 3 usual methods of carrying on 
the war, poisoning, hounding and trapping, 
detailed accounts will be given in future 
numbers. In the meantime it is very de- 
sirable to. have careful answers to the fol- 
lowing questions, with a view to getting the 
evidence necessary to bring the whole mat- 
ter forcibly and intelligently before the au- 
thorities, as well as the public. 

Personal experiences are what are de- 
sired and it is hoped that correspondents 
will at least sharply distinguish between 
what they themselves know, and mere hear- 
say. 

1. Where are you located? 

2. Are gray wolves troublesome in your 
region? 

3. What do they destroy? Horses? Cat- 
tle? Sheep? 

4. About what amount of damage should 
you estimate they do in a year, in your 
county or range? 

5. Did you ever know of a gray wolf kill- 
ing or harming a human being? 

6. Are wolves increasing in numbers? 

7. Have you any reason to believe that 
wolves can signal across country, and so 
tell each other what parts are dangerous 
or where the hunting is good? 

8. What is the average and the greatest 
weight and measure of a wolf, according to 
your certain knowledge? 

9. Do you consider the coyote a nuis- 
ance; or do you consider the harm done in 
killing lambs, etc., more than balanced by 
the good they do in keeping down gophers, 
ground squirrels, etc.? 

10. What do you consider the best means 
— legislative and practical — of dealing with 
the wolf question? 

If sufficient interest is taken in the sub- 
ject, by ranchmen and others immediately 
concerned, Recreation will publish a series 
of articles on the best methods of killing 
wolves; and< the whole matter will be put 
in such shape that the State and territorial 
governments will be obliged to consider, 
seriously, the advisability of offering a 
maximum bounty for each gray wolf scalp 
taken within their respective limits. 



46 



RECREA TION. 



HOW TO LEARN. 

A. C. H. 

In answer to D. T. R., who asks, in March 
Recreation, how to learn to shoot on the 
wing, I would advise him to get a copy of 
" The Dead Shot," by " Marksman," pub- 
lished in 1864 by W. A. Townserid of New 
York. I have a copy of this work, and 
found it invaluable when learning to use 
the gun. It is just the thing for beginners 
and can be studied with great profit, by old 
shooters. There is always something to 
learn and to pick up; and this book treats 
the whole question in a very simple manner. 

I would advise D. T. R., if he has an 
ordinary, every day length of neck, to use 
a gun that has about a 2 inch drop to the 
stock and a length, from butt to trigger, 
of about 14^2 inches, or what may suit the 
length of his arm. The barrels should be 
28 inches in length. 

I advocate the straight stock, as there is 
no fear of a beginner shooting too high, or 
too far in front. The trouble is they shoot 
too low, and straight at the object, when 
they first start in. More birds are missed 
by shooting under, than over. One forgets 
that gravitation acts on the shot, in its 
passage; and when the object is aimed at 
point blank, the shot will strike below it. 

All birds, when flushed, are rising, except 
when flushed on top of a hill; and the 
shooter will not kill his bird, if when in the 
act of pressing (not pulling) the trigger, 
he can see the bird above the muzzle of his 
gun. This is one strong point. 

Another is, don't try to sight along the 
barrel. Keep your eyes open, and on the 
bird, and remember the hand must work 
with and obey the eye. Remember how 
you hit a chum in the back of the neck, 
with a snow ball. You don't look at your 
hand, but at the neck, and let go. 

Keep your gun moving, at the moment 
of pressing the trigger. Don't stop it to 
pull the trigger, for if you do, you will 
miss and your shot will pass behind the 
bird. This is the secret of many a miss at 
a rapidly crossing bird. 

Here are 3 secrets from " Marksman." 
If you master them — and you can with 
practice — you will be a good shot. 

1st. At straightaway shots, keep your 
head up. Cover the back of the bird at the 
instant you press the trigger and let go. 

2d. If a bird is crossing to the right, lay 
your head well over the stock, keeping the 
visual line on a level with the head of the 
bird, more or less in advance, according 
to distance, and speed with which it may be 
flying when you shoot. 

3d. If the bird is crossing to the left, keep 
your head straight, letting the visual line 
be on a level with the head of the bird, and 
in front, from one to 24 inches, according 
to distance and speed of flight. Bear in 



mind, that the most skilful and deadly 
shots, sometimes miss fair open shots. 

In throwing your gun up, run your left 
hand well in advance of trigger guard, 
and keep in mind that the hand that presses 
the trigger must obey the eye. To learn 
this, correctly, take a common playing 
card; blacken it over; stick it up on a 
white fence, or board, say 25 yards away. 
Load with 2 drms. powder and 1 oz. shot. 
Turn your back to the card. Then in the 
act of turning about to face the card cock 
your gun, chuck it to your shoulder, keep- 
ing your eyes on the card, and the instant 
the butt touches your shoulder press the 
trigger. When you can fill that card full 
of shot, 9 times out of 10, I will guarantee 
you will down your grouse or woodcock, 
in cover, almost every shot; as you will 
then be able to pitch your gun on the ob- 
ject, every time, without poking about try- 
ing to take aim. 

Never point your gun at a living object, 
unless you intend to kill it. Keep the muz- 
zle from constantly staring at your friend. 



HOW THE SAVAGE WORKS. 

Carritunk, Me. ' 

In December last I started on a moose 
hunt with W. D. Sullivan and J. D. Mer- 
rill, of Boston. We made Hackett's camps, 
at Moxie pond, our headquarters. The first 
day out we saw 10 deer, but owing to the 
crust we got only 1 of them — a big buck. 
His antlers spread 23 inches. We next 
climbed Moxie Bald mountain, hoping to 
find caribou there; but found only some 
old signs. We had no good still hunting 
until ready to return home. We brought 
out 1 moose and 2 deer. We started 2 
moose, a cow and 2 calves, within 1^2 miles 
of Hackett's camps. 

I find the Savage rifle will kill a moose 
as quick and as dead as any rifle I ever 
used. I know of a number having been 
killed with the Savage, and they all stopped 
within a few yards of where they stood 
when shot. Some of these I have killed 
myself, and none of them ran more than 
100 yards. I have kept a record of game 
killed with this rifle, which I give below: 

1st. Deer shot through point of shoul- 
der; bullet passed through the heart and 
was found near kidneys; distance, 60 yards; 
ran 25 yards. 
2d. Deer shot in neck; bullet lodged un- 
der skin, on top of neck; 
distance 100 yards; was 
dead when I got him. 

3d. Deer shot back of 
shoulder, through lights; 
bullet passed clear through 
him; ran 50 yards; was 
dead when I got to him; 
distance, 50 yards. 
4th. Deer shot through 




.303 SAVAGE BUL- 
LET TAKEN FROM 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



47 



shoulder; dropped where he stood; died 
in a few minutes; distance 60 yards; bullet 
not found. 

5th. Buck shot in neck, at 100 yards; 
bullet lodged on top of neck. This bullet 
I found, and send it to you herewith. Buck 
weighed 200 pounds. The other buck that 
was shot in the neck weighed 278 pounds. 

6th. Buck shot through shoulders; bul- 
let not found; distance 75 yards; did not 
run at all; weighed 210 pounds. 

7th. Buck shot through body; ran 100 
yards; gave him second shot; bullets not 
found. 

8th. Deer shot through the body; dis- 
tance 100 yards, dropped where he stood; 
died in a few minutes; bullet not found. 

9th. Moose shot through shoulder low 
down; bullet passed through lights. He 
started to run, when I fired the second 
shot. He did not run more than 25 yards, 
and died in a few minutes; distance, 100 
yards. 

I think the Savage rifle will kill any game 
we have in Maine. I have killed a great 
many deer and 'moose, and used all kinds 
of rifles; but do not think I ever saw deer 
and moose die so quickly, or with so little 
shooting. 

I find moose are becoming numerous in 
the country around Moxie pond. Have 
seen the signs of 22 different moose, within 
10 miles of that pond, since the 1st. Hac- 
kett's camps are finely located for this hunt- 
ing region. George C. Jones. 



FROM OREGON. 

I have just returned from a long trip in 
the Cascade mountains and will give you a 
few pointers as to Southern Oregon. The 
best fishing I know of is on the head of the 
North Umpqua river, above the canyon, 
although both North and South rivers are 
pretty good. Rogue river is also reason- 
ably good. 

There are plenty of deer all over South- 
ern Oregon except in the valleys; that is, 
a good hunter can get 1 to 4 a day. Bear 
are quite plentiful about West Fork, just 
now, feeding on raspberries. There are 
still a good many elk both in the Cascade 
and Coast mountains and on the high 
ranges well back from the settlements. If 
any of your friends wishes to have some 
good bear hunting let him come to West 
Fork about the 1st of September, for a 
month's outing at Bear Camp, or Eden Val- 
ley. The bear hunting lasts only about a 
week, but owing to the late and early sea- 
sons it varies some, requiring parties to be 
on the ground when it does come or they 
may lose the chance for the season. No 
dogs required, for when the bear come they 
come by the dozens and are in plain sight 
in the short brush that carries the acorns, 
on which they feed. 



Mr. Arrowsmith is an old friend of mine 
and anything I can do for any of his friends 
I will do with pleasure. I received Rec- 
reation and am very much pleased with 
it. I found in the March number just what 
I was looking for; that is, information as 
to the work of the small bore smokeless 
rifle. I have never seen one of them and 
should like to try them on large game. 

I will send you some short stories later 
in the season, but at present am too busy 
in the hills, as this is the time I make my 
money. I think of a trip through the moun- 
tains of Northern Washington next fall, if 
everything goes right, as that is a part of 
the Western coast I have never yet visited. 
I may be able, on this trip, to send you 
some photos of hunting scenes. Should 
you happen to visit this coast give me a 
call and see how I will treat you. 

W. A., West Fork, Ore. 



THE TEXAS GAME MARKET. 

FROM THE " GALVESTON NEWS." 

The convention of game protective asso- 
ciations, called to meet in Austin, is a 
declaration of war on the market hunter. 
The other kind, the man who takes life for 
the keen pleasure derived from the taking 
of it, poses as a friend of the game. The 
probable outcome of the conference will be 
a bill before the legislature prohibiting the 
shipping of game beyond Texas points. 
While this could not be called unfair to the 
market hunter, as far as regards the greater 
varieties of game, yet there are some kinds 
that are not salable at their best prices in 
our state. The lordly canvasback and the 
regal terrapin are not for us. They are for 
our betters, in New York and Washington. 
Rich epicures in those places do not hesi- 
tate at paying for a pair of canvasbacks a 
price that would buy a yearling steer in 
Texas. Terrapin, plover and the 2 ducks, 
canvasback and redhead, are the only game 
that can be shipped to Northern markets 
at a profit. 

For Texas markets the canvasback classes 
with the mallard. This latter variety is sel-' 
dom shipped out of the state, and sells in 
the game houses of Corpus Christi, Rock- 
port and Lavaca at seldom more than $2 a 
dozen. These same houses are paying $8 
a dozen for canvasback for their New York 
trade. Should a law be passed as intimated. 
the slaughter will go on as before. The 
only change will be that the sum realized 
by the market hunter will be less. 

The ultimate extermination of game is 
certain; legislation can only defer the re- 
sult. Game recedes from settled communi- 
ties, and as the coast counties are now 
settling fast it is but a question of time 
when the waterfowl will be as scarce as that 
noblest of all Texas game, the wild turkey. 



4 8 



RECREA HON. 



A BELLIGERENT BULL MOOSE. 

We were camping on the East branch of 
the Penobscot, in 1891, between the head 
of Grindstone' falls and the mouth of Wis- 
ataquoik stream. Priest was an old guide 
and hunter, but had been converted to a 
lumberman. He was short and heavy, and 
had a stiff leg. One day he started out 
exploring for lumber. About 9 o'clock he 
was going through a pine growth, when he 
ran upon a large bull moose. The animal 
charged him at once. Priest started up a 
tree, but before he got 5 feet from the 
ground, the moose was upon him. The 
man had always been in the woods and was 
accustomed to shinning up trees, so man- 
aged to keep on the side opposite the bull. 

Three times the moose reared and struck 
down the sides of the tree, his hoofs swish- 
ing by Priest's head like rifle bullets. He 
kept on climbing, and soon was out of 
reach. Reaching a large limb, he seated 
himself, lit his pipe and awaited develop- 
ments. The moose kept rearing and strik- 
ing the tree, knocking off bark and pieces 
of wood. Well, the old man was kept there 
until about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, 
when the bull went away, releasing his 
prisoner. 

Priest slid down the tree and came to 
camp as fast as his stiff leg would carry 
him. 

That evening he prepared a birch-bark 
horn, for calling. After dark he and I 
started up the river in a bark canoe. The 
old man was mad, and wanted to kill some 
kind of a moose, to relieve 'his feelings. 

The bank, where we intended to watch, 
was steep and high; the water deep along 
shore, but about 70 feet out it ran off shoal 
to a gravel bar. I held the canoe by a 
bush, from the bow, while my companion 
called, from the stern. 

When everything was ready, Priest gave 
a long, low bellow on the horn, that rang 
for miles around. In about 2 minutes we 
heard an answer. After 20 minutes another 
call was given. The answer was nearer 
and louder. 

On the bull came to within 30 yards, and 
stopped. Priest filled his horn with water 
and let it drip into the stream. In an instant 
the old fellow came with a bound and a 
roar. Before I had time to shove the 
canoe from the shore, he plunged over the 
bank, striking his forefeet fairly into the 
middle of the boat, driving them through 
the bottom. Kicking with his hind feet in 
the water, he was sending the canoe out 
toward the gravel bar. When we got into 
shallow water, I jumped and sang out to 
Priest to fire. He did so, and one shot 
did the work. This was the biggest moose 
I ever saw. 

_ I have seen the old man many times 
since, and he never fails to recall the moose 
hunt, on the East branch. 

C. E. H., Medway, Me. 



North Platte, Neb. 

Editor Recreation: Duck and goose 
shooting was good last spring, although no 
one has made large bags of Canada geese, 
and many hunters returned empty handed. 
The unusual amount of rain and snow filled 
the sloughs and overflowed the prairies, so 
that the ducks had a large territory over 
which to feed and were comparatively safe 
from the hunters. Some of the best bags 
were made shooting from sandbars in the 
river. Redhead ducks were more abundant 
than usual and canvasbacks rather scarcer. 
The snow geese, or white brant, as they are 
commonly called, were so abundant, at 
some points along the Platte river, as to 
fairly whiten the fields where they feed; and 
an engineer recently told me he saw a 40- 
acre corn field literally covered with them. 
For some reason they are not hunted so 
much as the Canada geese, although they 
are much less wary. They are not consid- 
ered so good for eating. 

Old prairie chickens were more abundant 
last spring than for 3 or 4 years, and we 
hope for another season of good chicken 
shooting. As I was dressing, this morning, 
the booming of the cocks floated in at the 
open window, from the prairies adjacent to 
town, and raised bright visions of fine 
sport, with the large coveys, in the fall. A 
wet spring is always most favorable, here, 
to a good hatch and an abundance of full 
grown grouse in the fall. 

M. K. Barnum. 



Sportsmen are beginning to realize that 
game is becoming less abundant each sea- 
son. The conclusion reached by many, 
therefore, is that game laws are either 
loosely regarded, throughout the country, 
or the present laws are not strict enough. 

Even in the olden times there were many 
strict laws for protection of game, which 
made poaching no less a crime than theft. 
The promptness with which General Wash- 
ington acted, on one occasion, in punish- 
ing a poacher, might serve as an example 
for the proper treatment of pot hunters. 

There was a certain worthless fellow, 
notorious as a poacher, who was known to 
frequently trespass on the grounds belong- 
ing to Mount Vernon. He had been 
warned time and again, by Washington, 
but continued his depredations. He would 
cross the river in a canoe, and with fowling 
piece make havoc among the canvasbacks 
that flocked to the low marshlands. 

One day, as Washington was going 
about the plantation, he heard the report 
of a gun in the direction of the river. Sur- 
mising what was in the wind, he spurred 
his horse toward the sound. Dashing 
through the bushes, he came upon the cul- 
prit, just as he was pushing from shore. 
The fellow, seeing his danger, cocked his 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



49 



gun and, with a threatening look, leveled 
it directly at Washington. He, however, 
without heeding it in the least, rode into 
the water, seized the canoe by the painter, 
and dragged it ashore. Leaping from his 
horse, he wrenched the fowling piece from 
the astonished poacher, and belabored him 
in such a manner as to make him wish the 
wide Potomac was between him and the 
irate General. He never trespassed again 
on the forbidden grounds. 

Ralph Latson, Iowa Falls, la. 



Editor Recreation:- One of the best 
and oldest ways of cooking fish or game 
in the woods, is as follows: 

Having built a fire of size in proportion 
to the amount of food to be cooked, let it 
burn down to a glowing mass of coals and 
ashes. Wash and season your fish well and 
then wrap them up in clean grass, leaves, 
bark or cotton cloth. Then, after scraping 
away the greater part of the coals, put the 
fish among the ashes, cover up with same 
material, and heap the coals on top. 

The fish cooks quickly — 15 or 20 minutes 
— according to the size. Having once eaten 
fish or game cooked in this way you will 
agree with me that it is the best in the world 
for camp cooking. 

Clay also answers the purpose of protect- 
ing the fish or game from the fire, if no 
other material is at hand, and in fact for 
game, or anything that requires more time 
for cooking, it makes the best covering. 
Wet paper is also good and is about the best 
of all for fish. 

Probably most of the old veterans have 
tried this method of cooking, when in the 
woods or on the shore, but I have shown it 
to many guides and others to whom it was 
new, and now mention it for the benefit of 
any of Recreation's younger readers who 
may get caught away from home or camp 
without a frying pan. You should always 
carry a small bag of salt in your pocket 
when in the woods. It will often provide 
you the savor for a good meal, when other- 
wise you would have to go hungry, 

Bergen, Hackensack, N. J. 



Editor Recreation : Deer hunting 
promises to be good next season, for deer 
are now low down and numerous. A few 
days since, I jumped 2, in sight of the 
house, and later saw a bunch of 20. 

This morning a flock of black geese, so 
called, passed over. The river is high and 
muddy, and the ducks have gone to the 
lakes, back in the hills. A flock of ducks 
new to this section was on the lake a few 
days this spring.* 

At the last session of our Legislature, 
game laws were made more stringent. 
Perhaps the most important change is that 

* From the description that followed, I should judge 
the ducks to be redheads.— Editor. 



prohibiting the killing of elk at all times, 
thus placing this animal on the same foot- 
ing with the bison and the mountain sheep. 
Owing to the rapidly diminishing numbers 
of elk, this is a wise provision, though I 
fear protection comes rather late. Trappers 
on the Little Snake river, in Routt county, 
say that for the past 3 or 4 years, elk have 
been going Northward into Wyoming, in 
bands of 300 to 400, while none have come 
back. 

Under the new law, deer may be killed 
from August 15 to October 15. The open 
season for fishing, formerly June 1 to De- 
cember 1, is shortened 1 month. 

Many people in this vicinity, who depend 
on the tourists for a livelihood, are dissat- 
isfied with the new law: though in my opin- 
ion it should be rigidly enforced. Every 
sportsman in the State should co-operate 
with the game warden, and aid him in every 
way possible. L. D. G., Dotsero, Col. 



Editor Recreation: Having hunted the 
wild bee for 25 years, from the Atlantic to 
the Pacific, I am satisfied that for hard 
work, the Puget sound region beats every- 
thing else on the continent. In following 
hives, one encounters a tangled jungle, 
composed of small thickets, so close a dog 
can hardly get through. Sallal, huckle- 
berry brush, devil's club, and profanity 
make impenetrable thickets. On a warm 
day, this beats a Turkish bath by several 
points. 

Again, when the tree is found, it is likely 
to be such a sky-scraper, as to make it 
practically impossible to save either 'bees 
or honey. 

In favored locations the woods are full 
of bee-trees. To my knowledge, during 
the season of '95, in a small swamp, 19 bee- 
trees were cut. Even then all were not 
found, for more were discovered last sea- 
son, and the wind recently blew down still 
another. I was told that last season one 
man near here found and cut 27 trees. 

The find, in honey, yields from nothing 
to 150 pounds or more, according to season 
and time of cutting. 

In one tree, with the hive 60 feet above 
ground, which I cut, the honey was so im- 
pregnated with formic acid as to be almost 
worthless. Another with the hive 98 feet 
high, was then cut to see if the greater 
height would have the same effect on the 
honey. The result was a mass of bees, 
honey and rotten wood. About 40 pounds 
was gathered, boiled, strained: and re- 
boiled until clear. Then it was too strong 
with formic acid to be used. 

A week of hard work, with a glass, was 
occupied in finding this hive, after locating 
the tree. It is more profitable, on finding 
such a tree, to leave the bees in their sweet 
and lofty home. 

Beeswax, Tacoma, Wash. 



5<> 



RECREA TION. 



While passing through Bismarck and 
Mandan, over the Northern Pacific, just 
after the floods of the Missouri, I had for 
some time been watching the vast fields of 
ice, on the Mandan flats, when my atten- 
tion was called to the body of a deer that 
had evidently been crushed between heavy 
blocks of floating ice. It was lying on a 
stranded ice floe, not far from the railway 
embankment. This started the inquiry, 
how many deer were killed by the immense 
fields of floating ice that swept over the 
great stretches of low lands, where the tfeer 
congregate in winter? 

I learned that citizens in the neighbor- 
hood of Bismarck had braved the dangers 
of flood and ice fields, with their boats, in 
the work of saving the deer. Over ioo 
were rescued. One party saved nearly 40. 
Some of the animals were driven ahead of 
the boats, through openings in the ice, 
while others were so chilled as to make it 
necessary to carry them. Almost all of the 
deer were liberated where they could take 
to the hills. A very few of the weaker were 
kept and cared for as pets. It is to be 
hoped other localities are blessed with 
sportsmen having the same noble spirit. 

A. J. Stone. 



I send you this clipping from the Glou- 
cester " Daily Times " hoping you will find 
use for it. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives that 

Whoever takes or kills a rabbit > grey squirrel or chip- 
munk, or any land bird, except the English sparrow, 
within the limits of that section of this Commonwealth 
bounded by Squam river, Ipswich bay, Atlantic ocean, 
Massachusetts bay and Gloucester harbor, at any time 
within 5 years of the passage of this act, shall be pun- 
ished by a fine of $20 for every rabbit, squirrel, chipmunk 
or bird so taken or killed. 

After the law was passed parties in Glou- 
cester and Rockport bought 10 or 15 pairs 
of Canada hares, and liberated them in dif- 
ferent parts of the cape. 

If the law is strictly enforced it will do a 
great deal of good; as there are a number 
of quails, and a few partridges. Interested 
parties secured 2 pairs of pheasants. I do 
not know whether they were Mongolian 
or English, but they are going to breed 
them with a view to stocking the woods. 
B. F. B., Rockport, Mass. 



Many geese passed over here last spring. 
Warren is a good place for sportsmen. It 
is on the Great Northern railroad, 330 
miles North of St. Paul. October is the 
best month for geese. 

A man makes a mistake when he uses an 
8 gauge gun over decoys. A 10, with No. 2 
shot, is better for geese. I got into my 
pit at daylight, one frosty morning last Oc- 
tober, with an 8 gauge gun. The shooting 
was lively for an hour; 12 flocks of geese 
came to the decoys, and I fired 24 shots, 



dropping- only 12 birds. With a lighter 
gun, I might have had at least 20. 

The field was good for sneaking and 
that evening was covered with geese. The 
farmer wanted me to crawl up and kill " 20 
at a shot," but I did not disturb them, 
knowing they would come to feed in the 
morning. The fun of seeing 12 geese fall 
beats a pot shot every time. My gun was 
built for one bird at a time; and the reason 
I missed so many was because I did not 
have a crack shot in the pit to shoot at the 
same time. As it was, I could count every 
miss. E. S., Warren, Minn. 



St. Anthony, Idaho. 

Editor Recreation: I have just returned 
from a trip through the country where the 
game winters. Most of the game from the 
National Park formerly wintered here, as 
also that from Jackson's Hole, but the last 
few years the game has changed about a 
good deal; that is, the deer, elk and moun- 
tain sheep. The moose and antelope don't 
change much. 

I started from St. Anthony, with my 
brother and another man, on the 1st day 
of May, and on the 2d we found where 7 or 
8 buffalo had wintered, in 2J/2 feet of snow. 
As the snow goes off they work back into 
the National Park. I think the same bunch 
wintered here a year ago. I heard there 
were some out in the lava beds, and on 
January 1st, '96, went out to look after 
them. I found their trail. The man who 
told me where they were, wounded one but 
didn't get it. I followed the trail, by the 
blood, 6 or 8 miles, but it was storming so 
hard I had to give it up. 

The past winter has been a hard one on 
game. A large band of elk wintered close 
to the buffalo, but no deer. The snow was 
so deep the antelope and deer wintered 
low down. 

There are plenty of bear here, and I ex- 
pect to catch some. Their hides will be 
good until July 1st. 

A buffalo hide went from here, last win- 
ter, to a man in Chicago; and there is a 
nice mounted head for sale in a store in 
this town. I think there is also one that 
is not mounted. George Winegar. 



When a man kicks 3 times, good and 
hard, on my cabin door, at 5 o'clock in the 
morning, I naturally think something has 
gone wrong; but when he gets his wind 
sufficiently to tell me he is a reader of 
Recreation I throw my door wide open; 
extend to him the right hand of fellowship 
and cordially invite him in. He is welcome 
to eat of my dough-gods and breakfast 
bacon; to smoke my new cob pipe and to 
ride my pinto bronk, who never hogs. 
Then I will loan this stranger my favorite 
rifle — a 50-95 Bullard express — which, by 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



5 1 



the way, is a little out of date but never 
goes back on a friend. Well, in short, as 
this man is our kind of people, so I will just 
go along with him myself, and will show 
him over the finest hunting and fishing 
grounds on the earth. 
W. H. Hubbard, Glenwood Springs, Col. 



Recreation improves every month and 
no sportsman can afford to be without it. 
I'm glad to see you roasting the game 
hogs. That's what they need. Enclosed 
find 10 cents for the fresh-air fund. " It's a 
good thing, push it along." 

C. G., Tacoma, Wash. 



It is estimated that 25,000 to 30,000 elk 
have wintered on the East side of Green 
river, and they have lately gone back to 
their summer ranges in the mountains. It 
is a picture not soon to be forgotten, to see 
a band of 500 or 600 elk, moving swiftly 
along the top of some high ridge, on their 
way to their breeding grounds. 

Fully as many deer have also recently re- 
turned to their summer homes. Antelope 
are, in the words of the country sale bill, 
" too numerous to mention." 

While on the range a few weeks ago I 
saw 11 mountain sheep. Among them was 
a ram with large horns. I also saw fresh 
signs of a much larger bunch. In the fall 
I shall try to get some of them. 

Anyone in search of fine hunting can 
have it in this country, next fall. Grouse, 
sage hens, geese and ducks are plentiful, 
and trout are abundant. 

Come out, Coquina, and pull on my latch 
string. I will send you away happy and 
loaded with trophies of the chase. 

H. D. DeKalb, Big Piney, Wyo. 



I have been a subscriber to Recreation 
only a few months, but consider I already 
have value received. It is a magazine which 
gives a sportsman an idea of what game 
protection means, and what a game hog is. 
We have some true sportsmen here and 
also some " kill-it-all-to-day sportsmen." 

I heard of a party hounding deer near 
by, so 2 friends and I took our 40-60's and 
watched them several days. They got 
scared and left the woods. Next season we 
will not go after the dogs, but after the 
men. I think they will then understand 
lawful deer hunting. 

We are about to organize a boat and gun 
club. I expect soon to get a number of 
subscribers to Recreation. 

O. E. D., Siverly, Pa. 



Kendrick (the largest in the city), tell me 
that each month the demand increases. 

I 'have had good sport coursing jack rab- 
bits, with my greyhounds, near Denver, 
and have also had several coyote hunts on 
Kiona creek. During the winter, a tally 
was kept on the coyotes killed by grey- 
hounds, near the creek. The number was 
106. The neighboring stockmen and sheep- 
raisers are getting packs of greyhounds. 
Mr. Nott, who made the big killing, has 
only 5 hounds in his pack, but it is a rare 
occurrence for a coyote to get away. 

L. F. B., Denver, Col. 



We have lately had an example of what 
a game hog will do when he gets a chance. 
A. S. Eaton, and a party of 4 or 5 others, 
went out a few days ago and killed 240 
ducks and 5 geese. It seems to me there 
ought to be some way to punish men who 
go to such extremes. Game is being 
rapidly exterminated by men who are thus 
wasteful of it.* 

Ducks are plentiful here just at present 
and the black bass and perch, in Seeley's 
lake, are beginning to bite freely. 

Ed. L. S., Greeley, Colo. 



A Canadian exchange reports that 
George Soles, of East Chezzetcook, sjiot 2 
moose and a bear in 2 days, last fall. He 
got out the carcass of the first moose safe, 
but lost the other. He left the second 
moose in the woods to get help of neigh- 
bors to bring the carcass out. When the 
hunter returned for the meat he found it 
torn to pieces and a large part missing. 
The tracks showed a bear had been there 
and had made a meal off the moose. Soles 
waited for the bear, who came back about 
dusk and Soles killed him. The bear was a 
big black fellow, estimated to weigh 700 
pounds. The skin measured 7 feet in length 
and nearly the same across the body. 



I am pleased to see that Recreation is 
getting the large circulation it so richly 
deserves. My newsdealers, Hamilton & 



The correspondent who signs his letter 
" An office man " is informed that many 
articles, containing such information as he 
asks for, have been published in previous 
issues of Recreation, and if he will kindly 
give me his name and address, I will gladly 
cut out and mail him some of these. Other 
articles, of a similar nature, will be printed 
in future numbers. The list of guides who 
live in points on Long Island, in Sullivan 
Co. and in near by Jersey points, together 
with the kinds of game and fish they un- 
dertake to find for sportsmen, may be con- 
sulted advantageously. By corresponding 
with these guides the reader would get 
valuable points and need not thereafter em- 
ploy the guides unless he chose to do so. 

* I hope the Colorado Legislature will soon provide for 
sending such swine to the State corral where they belong. — 
Editor. 



52 



RECREA TION. 



P. C, Carthage, Mo., evidently meant to 
say, in exploiting his father's shooting 
abilities, " before they got off the ground," 
instead of, " before they got out of range." 
With reference to my brother's shooting, 
as reported in Recreation: The birds 
were flushed by me, after having been found 
by " Sister," the best little pointer in Ohio, 
and my brother killed 3 dead and crippled 
the 4th so badly that we got it, too. It will 
be remembered he was shooting a Win- 
chester repeating shot gun. But that's 
right, P. C. Make 'em give you all the 
details. Bert Cassidy, Chicago, Ilk 



The Legislature made some changes in 
the game laws, but they are hardly any 
better than before. The provision for a 
State game warden was killed. There 
might as well be no laws, when there is no 
one to enforce them. 

Illegal netting is going on in the Mis- 
souri, between Logan and Canyon Ferry. 
The result is a diminution of trout and 
grayling. Thousands of geese and brant 
passed over here, on their way North, last 
spring. The flight of ducks was small. 
Prospects are good for feathered game 
generally. A. B., Helena, Mont. 



Our new game law is similar, in some 
respects, to others passed in Montana. 
With no game warden to enforce it, game 
will be killed and sold by pot hunters as 
heretofore. Every one who knows of it 
seems afraid to inform. One big party, 
coming into the State to hunt, leaves 
enough money to pay 2 or 3 wardens. With 
game properly protected, settlers and 
ranchers could get all the winter's meat 
they need, with, plenty of game every year 
for sportsmen. As it is now the ranchers 
have to eat hog and tough beef. 

W. A. H., Fridley, Mont. 



A letter from the Rangeley region says: 
" Three deer, a buck and 2 does, made their 
appearance in front of the Ledge house 
April 22d, the first for the season. They 
came near to the house, and were tame. 
Apparently they were looking for their old 
place to get salt, which was then over- 
flowed with water. The deer have become 
so accustomed to being fed with salt, and 
not being molested in any way, that one is 
almost sure of seeing from one to half a 
dozen every day, in the summer months, 
from the Ledge house piazza." 



Colorado will be for some time a fine 
game State, if the laws are enforced. I 
think all reliable guides should be licensed 
and then appointed game wardens. There 
should also be a bounty on lions, coyotes, 
wolves, lynx, and bob cats, as they kill 
more game than do hunters. 



I know where 2 big silver-tips holed up 
last fall, in a canyon about 20 miles from 
here. I am going after them soon. 

C. A., Dotsero, Col. 



For the benefit of W. C. S., and some 
others who have been annoyed by my letter 
printed in February Recreation, I will say 
the game spoken of in that letter was part 
of the game I killed in 1896, and not in 2 or 
3 days as it appeared in print. I regret the 
error should have been made but supposed 
every reader would understand that it was 
an error and that I had no intention of 
claiming I bagged it in so short a time. 

W. H., Akron, O. 



The spring flight of Canada geese was 
unusually large this year. The rainfall was 
heavy, and all the " sand hill " lakes are 
full. The prospect for fall shooting is 
good. Ducks and geese will be plentiful, 
though chickens are scarcer every fall. The 
sportsmen about here are making strong 
efforts to put a good big " crimp " in the 
game hogs, who slaughter thousands of 
young chickens for the market every year. 
G. H. P., Pine Ridge Agency, S. D. 



The deer have been about all run out of 
here, by prospectors; but I killed what I 
needed — 6 in all. During the winter, I 
caught 2 foxes, 3 lynx, 1 cougar and 1 
fisher. There is little sign of fur now. The 
foxes nearly all left last fall, but will come 
back up in the mountains when the snow 
is settled. This is the poorest point for 
fishing I was ever in. 

J. H. C, Silver, Wash. 



I am a regular reader of several sports- 
men's periodicals, but Recreation is away 
ahead of the others. We have good fishing 
and hunting in this locality. I hunted 2 
days last fall and killed 8 deer. Bear and 
mountain lions are plentiful, with a good 
supply of small game, such as rabbits, 
grouse, ducks, etc. 

J. B., Kalispell, Mont. 



In the Northern counties of our State, 
deer are plentiful, with fair numbers of cats, 
lynx, foxes and an occasional black or 
brown bear; also quails, pigeons and 
grouse. Should any reader of Recreation 
desire to come to this State on a pleasure 
trip, or to go hunting, he might arrange to 
accompany us on our annual outing. 

Benj. W. Ferris, 
962 B'way, East Side, Oakland, Cal. 



I like Recreation very much and read it 
from cover to cover. 

Game is plentiful around here. I saw 29 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



53 



ducks Saturday. A boy shot one that day, 
but he did not know about the game laws. 

I like to read about the old hunters, and 
the Indians, who killed buffalo before I was 
born. 

H. L., Haverhill, Mass. 



I saw in April Recreation a few lines 
from E. N. H., of Reedsburg. I should 
like to ask that he favor us with a fuller 
account of the party's last fall hunt, in 
North Wisconsin, as I understand they had 
some experience with large deer, as well as 
some other fine sport. 

A. H., Reedsburg, Wis. 



Would like to know in what County, in 
the Western part of North Carolina, we 
could find the best hunting for deer, tur- 
keys, quails and grouse; also good fishing. 
C. W. L., Springfield, Mass. 

Will some reader please answer? 

Editor. 



Not since I can remember has the pros- 
pect been so good for the next season's 
shooting. Rabbits, quails and squirrels are 
more numerous than for years. Game laws 
are generally respected, though the farmers 
nearly all concede the present rabbit law 
a farce. J. T. M., Portersville, O. 



About 30 of the lovers of outdoor sports 
have lately organized the " Recreation 
Gun Club," at Eau Claire, Wis. Its mem- 
bership includes the best shooters in the 
city, and will, no doubt, soon take a high 
rank among the gun clubs of the North- 
west. Geo. Hall, Eau Claire, Wis. 



Mr. Benson, of Bass Harbor, has the 
only native grey fox in captivity, in New 
England. They are rare and this fellow is 
a beauty. Mr. Benson has been offered 
$100 for the fox and refused it. 



Two lads strolling about a piece of 
woods, on the Maine coast, ran across a 
den which contained 4 young foxes and a 
skunk. They captured the foxes but didn't 
disturb their partner. 



The Manitoba Field Trials Club has se- 
lected Thomas Johnson, of Winnipeg, 
Manitoba, to judge their nth annual Field 
Trials, which are to be held at Morris, 
Manitoba, on September 6th next. 



Our State Legislature has passed a law 
prohibiting the killing of deer for 5 years, 
and the Governor has appointed E. F. 
Smith, of Hinton, State Fish and Game 
Warden. 

John J. Baker, Fairmount, W. Va. 



Would like to say, in regard to Dr. Cox's 
buck fever, that I shot the first 2 deer I ever 
saw, in less than one minute. Two shot-, 
killed them both and I never thought of 
buck fever. E. N., Lynn, Mass. 



Game is scarce about here, except rab- 
bits and grouse. Fishing is good along 
the Missouri. Recreation is a beauty. 
J. G., Helena, Mont. 



There is a law in this State prohibiting 
the chasing of deer with hounds; but it is 
not strictly enforced. A few days ago a 
doe was killed, by a party hunting with 
dogs. As a consequence of this nefarious 
practice game is becoming scarce. 

N. N. B., Vancouver, Wash. 



We have excellent deer hunting here, in 
season, and the fishing cannot be excelled 
in the State. This town is on the Wiscon- 
sin river and in the big woods, in the 
Northern part of the State. 

J. C. W., Tomahawk, Wis. 



The ruffed grouse shooting scene, in a 
recent number of Recreation, is the most 
natural I have ever seen. The fallen tim- 
ber, flight of birds and position of shooters 
are truly natural. 

L. W. M., Dillingersville, Pa. 



Your efforts in making a sportsmen's 
periodical have far surpassed my expecta- 
tions. I do not see how any sportsman can 
get along without Recreation. I am 
anxiously waiting to hear more from your 
expedition in the Rockies. I hope to hear 
from your own pen soon, at which Friend 
Leach says, " Amen." 

A. G. T, Auburn, N. Y. 



We had an abundance of snow last win- 
ter and ponds and streams are full this 
spring, for the first time in some years. 
Many lakes were entirely dry, and fish all 
gone; but when they fill up again the fish 
will return, in some mysterious way, and 
we shall have sport once again. Success 
to you. W. O. R., Parker, So. Dak. 



Will secretaries of gun clubs please send 
me several copies of their constitution and 
by-laws? Sportsmen organizing new club? 
often ask for these. 



Not a great deal of snow in the woods 
last winter. No crust and deer have win- 
tered well. 

S., Blue Mountain Lake. N. Y. 



Quails are plentiful here, though last 
winter was very cold for them. 

N. C, Susanville, Cal. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



A GOOD DAY FOR DOUBLES. 

W. C. KEPLER. 

The long purple shadows of evening 
stretched Eastward until they mingled in 
one broad band, subduing the colors of the 
foliage; and the more active sounds of day- 
light hushed with the gathering twilight. 
The soft voice of the river spoke more and 
more distinctly; joined now and then with 
the shriller voices that come with night. 

In this delightful twilight hour, with rod 
in hand, I cautiously approached a deep 
pool that I knew, where the big bass loved 
to lie. Wild rice, now beginning its rank 
growth, formed a blind, back of which I 
could stand and cast almost to the farther 
side of the pool. A short distance below, 
Drummer and Tom were skilfully whipping 
the water, every now and then dropping 
bass into their creels. From time to time 
they would advise me to keep up with the 
procession. Drummer seemed anxious to 
have me in sight; for, as I was i or 2 
ahead at noon, he was keeping a close 
tally on my afternoon's catch, for fear that 
in some way I should outwit them. 

Unmindful of their attention, I loitered, 
dropping my flies on the smooth surface of 
the pools in every likely-looking place. 
After one cast, there was a moment of un- 
certainty; then, with a rush, a fly was 
taken. Hardly had the fish started on his 
first run, when a second shock set my rod 
quivering. I had hooked a double. 

•What uncertainty, what anxiety, attends 
such a catch! As you play the frantic pair, 
how intense your eagerness to land them! 
Here and there they went; sometimes 
starting in opposite directions, but bring- 
ing up with a surge that would have parted 
any but a good sound leader. Sometimes 
one was in the air, then the other; once 
both at the same time. 

By careful handling, I gradually worked 
back from the pool; gently urging them in 
my direction. It was a difficult place, for it 
was necessary to draw them through a nar- 
row channel in the river-grass. Into this 
the fish might easily dart, and by entangling 
the leader, free themselves. However, I 
managed to get them through and into 
shoal water. Even then I was disappointed, 
for the hook pulled from the larger one's 
mouth and he quickly disappeared into the 
grass. The smaller bass was easily capt- 
ured. 

The result of another cast was* a repeti- 
tion of the first: even down to the loss of 
■the best fish. Three times more my flies 
landed in the pool; every time raising 
doubles. Three pairs were landed safe. 
The last cast brought the largest bass of 



the lot — a 3-pounder- -with a companion of 
about 24 of a pound. 

After the last double, I tried once more; 
succeeding in lightly hooking a good sized 
bass, but lost him. 

Although I have hooked doubles before, 
I never had the good fortune to land so 
many. 

Leaving the pool, I soon joined my com- 
panions. The broad tail of the 3-pounder 
showed under the lid of my basket, and I 
could see Drummer screw his eyes around 
toward it. 

" Well, how do you like the sample?" I 
asked him, exultingly. 

" Huh! Been using bigger ones for bait 
all afternoon," was his calm answer. 

" What a liar you'll be, Drummer, if you 
keep on! Better reform while there's time." 

" I'll leave it to Tom, here, if I haven't 
been throwing back bigger ones right 
along." 

I gave up; for what is the use of talking 
to such a man! After you have told a true 
story, that has a spice of novelty about it, 
he will tell some outlandish lie — no matter 
if the moss does cover it — and all hearers 
will laugh. Then you will feel as if your 
own true story was a fabrication. Some 
day that man will die, and I shall probably 
be hanged for murder! 



LAKE TROUT FROM MONTANA 

Magdalen, Mont. 

Editor Recreation: I have read in Rec- 
reation the notes of Mr. Cummins and 
Professor Evermann, regarding Mackinaw 
trout in Elk lake, near the Madison divide, 
and as I live within a mile of that lake I 
can give you some information that may in- 
terest ichthyologists. 

The picture on the cover of Recreation, 
for February 1896, represents the fish as 
nearly as I can judge. I should say it is the 
same fish. The question as to whether these 
trout will bite has never been definitely set- 
tled. We have caught them with a net and 
have speared them at night, with a jack. As 
Mr. Cummins says, 8 pounds is the largest 
one that is known to have been caught, but 
many have been taken that weighed 3 to 5 
pounds. 

They spawn in the slide rock, at the edge 
of the lake, in September and October, the 
eggs being very large. The lake has no 
visible inlet nor outlet, except in the spring, 
when it overflows and a small stream runs 
out for a month or so. I irrigate from the 
lake and last spring when the overflow was 
running I opened my dams and let a lot of 
greyling run into the lake. These grow to 



54 



FISH AND FISHING. 



55 



good size here, but will not spawn. We 
have never seen a small greyling in the lake. 

There are also ling in this lake, which 
average about 10 inches in length. It is 
easy to account for these. They doubtless 
ran up some spring, when the water was 
high, from Red Rock lake. The latter, 
however, has none of these trout in it. 

Elk lake is 70 feet deep in places. Be- 
tween here and Madison river there is a 
chain of 4 lakes, Elk lake, Hidden lake, 
Cliff lake, and Wade lake. They are all in 
a canyon and it looks as if a river had run 
through there at some ancient time. The 
land no doubt slid in, in places, stopped the 
flow and made the lakes. 

Elk lake is about 4 miles long and % of a 
mile wide at the widest part. Hidden lake 
is about 1^2 miles long by Y\ mile wide; 
no inlet or outlet. Deepest place about 70 
feet. No fish have ever been seen in it. 
Cliff lake is about 3>4 miles by Yz mile wide. 
In the middle is the top of a round moun- 
tain, covered with timber, and sticking out 
as if it had sunk there at some time. This 
lake has 2 inlets, but no visible outlet. 
Depth about 70 feet. 

There are thousands of fish in Cliff lake, 
which look a good deal like our white fish. 
Some of them grow to be 2 feet long. They 
spawn in the fall and winter when one can 
go along the shore, where there are some 
small springs, and see thousands of them, 
some with their fins out of the water. You 
can shoot among them, with a rifle, and 
kill from 5 to 40 at a shot. 

Wade lake, about 2^2 miles long by Y-i 
mile wide, has a large spring inlet, no vis- 
ible outlet. No fish known to be in it. All 
these lakes have large springs breaking out 
below them. 

I have never heard of the Mackinaw trout 
being in Henry's lake. I think the way 
Professor Evermann heard of them there, 
was through Sawtell and Rash, of Henry's 
lake, Avho sent some of the trout from Elk 
lake, to Washington, to learn what kind 
they were. 

There is another lake in Montana that I 
know has the same trout in it. This lies 
West of the Big Hole basin, high up in the 
mountains. The outlet of it empties into 
the Big Hole river. It is a deep lake too. 
In the spring of 1888 E. W. Robbins and I 
caught 2 trout there, with hook and line. 
We were told some had been caught there 
that weighed 25 pounds. If these are the 
genuine Mackinaw trout, please say so in 
Recreation: as nobody in this country 
knows what kind of trout they are. 

James Blair. 



This letter of Mr. Blair's is deeply inter- 
esting and the information given concern- 
ing the lake trout is important. 



There are in the U. S. National Museum 
3 specimens of the lake trout, which were 
received fresh November 12, 1887, from 
" Mr. Gilman Sawtell, Alderdice, Beaver- 
head Co., Montana." It is said they were 
obtained by him in Henry's lake. Each of 
these specimens is about 14 inches long, to 
the base of the caudal fin, and they seem to 
agree closely with other specimens of the 
same size from Lake Superior. They are 
therefore the Great Lakes trout, or Mack- 
inaw trout (Cristivomer namaycush). This 
is the trout which is called " longe " in Ver- 
mont, or " togue " in Maine. 

Its nearest relative in the West is the bull 
trout, Dolly Varden trout, or Western charr 
(Salvelinus malma). 

The Mackinaw trout, or any species of 
the genus Cristivomer, can be readily told 
from all other trout by the color as well as 
by important structural characters. In all 
species of Cristivomer the spots are always 
gray instead of red, orange or black. 

The Mackinaw trout is widely distributed. 
It occurs throughout the Great lakes region 
and in the lakes of Northern New York, 
Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, 
Northward to Labrador and Boothia Felix 
— 70 North. It is also known from Great 
Bear lake, from Camin lake, 20 miles East 
of New Westminster, British Columbia, and 
Mr. Ashdown Green, of Victoria, has ob- 
tained it on Vancouver Island, and perhaps 
elsewhere in British Columbia. It was also 
found by Dr. Eigenmann at various places 
along the Canadian Pacific, viz: at Calgary, 
Banff, Devil's lake, Golden, and Revelstoke. 
These localities represent the basins of the 
Saskatchewan and Columbia. 

Many years ago Dr. Coues found it in 
Chief Mountain lake, on the boundary of 
Montana and Alberta. This is also in the 
Saskatchewan basin. In Alaska it has been 
found as far North as the Kuwuk river, 
within the Arctic Circle. 

The finding of this trout in Elk lake, in 
the Missouri river basin, is interesting as it 
does not seem to have been hitherto re- 
ported from that basin. 

All who are interested in questions con- 
nected with the geographic distribution of 
our game fishes will feel thankful to Messrs. 
Cummins and Blair for calling attention to 
the presence of this species in Elk lake. 
Cannot Mr. Blair tell us more about the 
other lake in which he caught the Mack- 
inaw trout — just where it is, its name, how 
to reach it, etc.? 

And now about the trout which Mr. Saw- 
tell sent to the National Museum in 1887: 
It is very important to know, definitely, 
whether they came from Henry's lake or 
Elk lake. The letter accompanying them 
evidently said " Henry's lake." Can Mr. 
Blair unravel the matter? 

Barton W. Evermann, 
Ichthyologist U. S. Fish Comm. 



56 



RECREA TION. 



HE WHO LAUGHS LAST, LAUGHS 
BEST. 

E. G. H. 

An amusing incident took place one day- 
last May, at the opening of the trout season. 

Charley and I, provided with our tackle 
and lunch, started one morning for a trout 
stream a few miles from the city. It was the 
second day of the season, and an ideal one 
for fishing, so we soon had our baskets 
well filled with good ones and went to a 
house on the farm, through which the 
stream flowed. 

During the dinner hour the Italian farmer 
entertained us with stories of the large trout 
that were to be found near a small neck of 
woods about a mile distant, where his cattle 
were accustomed to graze; so after dinner 
we wended our way to this much lauded 
strip of land. 

The stream made a large bend here and I 
took the upper part while Charley was be- 
low, about ioo yards away in a direct line 
but fully a quarter of a mile by water. We 
tried our luck. Intent on catching a big 
one I failed to notice, for a time, the low 
bellowing in the woods. Nearer came the 
sounds and louder. Charley had already 
heard them and said to himself, " Ah, ha! 
the bull. Krog will think it's a bear." 

I finally looked up and saw a number of 
cows, as I supposed, coming toward me. 
Again, after another cast, I looked up and 
beheld a large black animal in the lead, 
throwing his head in a significant manner 
and emitting a low, grumbling noise. 

Not being particularly anxious to make 
the animal's acquaintance, I reeled up and 
started toward Charley. When I looked 
back the bull seemed nearer. I increased 
my pace ; so did the bull. What was 
Charley doing all this time? 

" Look him in the eye." " Tickle him 
under the chin." " Look out or he will 
make a touchdown! " were some of the ex- 
clamations hurled at me. 

But I did not follow Charley's advice. 
The bull was now close behind me. A few 
yards ahead I espied a log extending out in 
the stream. With one mighty effort I 
reached it and another took me across. 
Then I looked around and saw the animal, 
with uplifted head and tail, evidently much 
disconcerted at the loss of such an oppor- 
tunity. 

Meanwhile Charley was roaring and split- 
ting his sides with laughter. The bull, at- 
tracted by his gesticulations and now thor- 
oughly infuriated, started for Charley. The 
meadow was wide. There was no log to 
cross. The nearest place of safety was a 
hill, 200 yards away. With basket in one 
hand and rod in the other, Charley began 
the race. The bull gained. Charley 
dropped his basket but still the bull gained. 



Then the rod was cast aside but this only 
seemed to lessen the distance between the 2. 
He could not reach the hill; but a high 
stump was before him and with one final 
effort he reached it and clambered on top. 

It was now my turn to laugh. " Talk to 
him in Italian." " Are you getting any 
bites?" "Mesmerize him!" were wafted 
over the stream to Charley. He implored 
me to go after the owner of the bull, which" 
I did after I got through laughing. The 
Dago's first exclamation was: 

" Oh, he no bite." 

I yelled to Charley to come down; that 
the bull would not bite; but for some rea- 
son Charley would not come. 

The bull was finally led away and we re- 
sumed our fishing in peace, deciding not to 
say anything about it when we reached 
town; but it was too good to keep. 



CATFISH IN LOUISIANA. 

Washington, D. C. 

Editor Recreation: I have just re- 
turned from a trip through the South, dur- 
ing which I devoted some time to a study 
of the catfish industry of Louisiana. This 
business centers chiefly at Morgan City, 
8o miles West of New Orleans, on the 
Atchafalaya river, though a good many fish 
are shipped from Melville and Plaquemine. 

The catfish industry is an important one, 
the shipments from Morgan City alone 
amounting to about 2,000,000 pounds an- 
nually. Nearly the entire catch consists of 
2 species of large catfish, the first being 
known as the blue cat, or poisson bleu 
(Ictalurus furcatus), the other the yellow 
cat, or goujon (Leptops olivaris). One or 2 
other species are occasionally taken. 

These catfish reach an immense size, ex- 
amples of each species weighing 80. to no 
pounds being frequently taken. The larg- 
est I saw, however, was a goujon which 
weighed 48 pounds. 

This is the only place I know of where 
an important fishery is carried on in the 
woods! During ordinary stages of water 
the fishing is done principally with trot- 
lines, or set-lines, which are placed in the 
river or its connecting lakes and bayous; 
but when the Mississippi " gets up " some- 
what, the greater part of the Atchafalaya 
region becomes flooded. Then the catfish 
take to the woods and the fishermen follow 
them. The fishing is done in this way: 
One end of the line is tied to a limb of a 
tree, and the hook, on the other end, is al- 
lowed to hang about 18 inches under water. 
The hook is baited with a piece of a hickory 
shad, or with a crawfish. Each fisherman 
ties his lines to the trees along the edge of 
one of the " float roads," if possible, so 
they may be easily found. If he places 
them promiscuously around, through the 



FISH AND FISHING. 



57 



woods, he blazes the trees to enable him to 
find them again. 

This method of fishing in the woods re- 
calls certain lines I once saw in Punch 
apropos of the proposed introduction of 
the American catfish into England: 

" Oh, do not bring the catfish here; 
The catfish is a name I fear. 
They say the catfish climbs the trees 
And robs the hen-roosts; down the 

breeze 
Sends the prodigious caterwaul. 
Oh, leave him in the Western flood, 
Where the Mississippi churns the mud. 
Don't bring him here at all." 

There are 3 firms at Morgan City which 
handle catfish exclusively. The fish are 
dressed, then shipped in ice to various 
Western States, chiefly Texas, Oklahoma, 
Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico, 
though a good many are sent North and 
are served in the best restaurants of Chi- 
cago and other large cities, as " trout ten- 
derloin." B. W. Evermann. 



A WHOLE HERD OF FISH HOGS. 

The same bunch of Stevens Point (Wis.) 
swine, who a year ago boasted of having 
gone to a creek near Plainfield, and, in one 
week caught over 1,000 trout, returned to 
the same water, a month ago, put in an- 
other week of hard work and caught but 
500 trout. 

That's right, piggies. Clean them out, 
as fast as possible. Don't let one of them 
escape. These 2 reports would seem to 
indicate that you won't be able to get any 
trout there next year unless the State comes 
to your aid, meantime, and restocks the 
stream. Then you can get another crop of 
fingerlings. 

Here are more " records " : 

B. B. Park, C. H. Grant, and R. B. Johnson spent Sat- 
urday and Sunday with the 4 lone fishermen, Hadcock, 
Boston, Ball, and Sherwood, who were trout fishing at 
Idlewild. Waushara county. In a few hours 4 of them suc- 
ceeded in capturing 121 trout. 



H. G. Curran, E. Ruben, and Dr. Houlehan spent part 
of Tuesday near Liberty Bluff. Marquette county, where 
they caught 196 trout. — Stevens Point Gazette. 



Fishing is good now. White bass plentiful. One man 
caught 136, from 9.30 A.M. to noon to-day. — Oshkosh Cor- 
respondent. 

Truly Wisconsin is in great need of a 
branding law. These men should all be 
marked, so that sportsmen may know them 
wherever found. 

Here is more of the same kind of news: 

People of this city and vicinity, who delight in catching 
fish, have had fine sport the past week. Mpckenzie creek, 
which enters Cannon Lake 4 miles west of Faribault, is the 
attractive place. The finny tribe are being caught by the 



wagonload. Lines and spears are not used, but instead 
pitchforks, corn-scoops, and shovels are used to shovel them 
out. Several wagon boxes full of fish have been standing 
on the market, offered for sale, many of the fish yet squirm- 
ing. Buffalo, bullheads, and some pickerel are among the 
catches.— Faribault (Minn.) paper, Feb. nth. 



Andrew H. Jackson, a millionaire real estate agent of 
New York city, fished in Sand Bar creek, near Mountain- 
dale, in company with Jacob Gunther, one of the most ex- 
perienced fishermen of this city, to-day, and secured 142 
trout, weighing from a quarter of a pound to one pound and 
a half each. This is considered one of the greatest catches 
made in years. — Middletown, N. Y., despatch to " New 
York Herald." 



And still another: 

All other claims to the championship record, in trout-fish- 
ing, have been thrown into the garbage-dump since John K. 
Bryden returned from Tidioute. While there, on business, 
this week, he was taken by William Grandin, of that place, 
on a fishing trip to Minister creek and Queen Run. P'or 
some reason best known to themselves the trout took to bit- 
ing with phenomenal fury. The 2 fishers actually basketed 
500 trout, all fine ones. So large was their catch that the 
" sportsmen" (?) had quite a task to distribute them among 
their friends.— "Franklin (Pa.) News." 

If any of their friends had been real 
sportsmen they would have refused to re- 
ceive any of the trout, or ever after to as- 
sociate with the swine who slaughtered 
them. Editor. 



THE FIGHT AT THE BIG HOLE. 

ELMER E. FRENCH. 

You may have fought the silver king in 
Florida, or the salmon in Northern waters. 
You may have captured the fierce muska- 
longe of the St. Lawrence, and won many 
other hard fought battles. Yet as you sit 
by your fireside and recall happy incidents 
that occurred afield or on the water, there 
will rise before you the struggle with that 
monster fish caught when you were a lad. 

When a boy, up in Maine, I had such an 
experience. In the White mountains, un- 
der the shadows of Mt. Whittier, lies beau- 
tiful Lake Ossipee. From it there flows 
Eastward the Ossipee river, which joins 
the Saco, 20 miles below. 

My father's farm was divided by the 
Ossipee, and the buildings were in sight of 
the water. 

Across the river, was interval land, yield- 
ing fine crops of hay. When it came time 
to cut the hay, the farm hands crossed the 
river in a boat. The stream here was about 
8 rods wide, shallow most of the way, then 
suddenly going off into what was called 
the " big hole." Here trout had rendez- 
voused for years. 

One day I stayed behind to fish this hole. 
I had no fancy rod — just a plain pole, cut 
in the woods, the small end as big as my 
thumb. The line cost 5 cents, while the 
hook was strong enough to hold anything. 

I soon had a fat grasshopper on the 
hook, and took a seat in the boat. The 



58 



RECREATION. 



grasshopper had not kicked more than 
twice on the water when I had a " good 
hard bite." I held on, but the fish was 
master of the situation, for a time. He 
ran toward all points of the compass, and 
in one of his rushes, pulled the pole against 
my head, knocking a new 50-cent straw hat 
into the water. 

I can even now see that hat sailing grace- 
fully down the stream. 

The howl I sent up was probably heard 
for a mile around, when I saw, with one 
eye, that my hat was gone. I say with one 
eye, for I kept the other on my line. 

At last the fish began to yield; his rushes 
became weaker and weaker; then he came 
to the surface, displaying the flag of dis- 
tress. I left the boat for the shore, not 
ceasing to cry, and dragged the fish out on 
the bank. 

With tear-stained face, bare-headed, but 
fish in hand, I started for the intervale. My 
coming was announced by weeping and 
wailing. My father, in alarm, left his work 
to see what the trouble was. As he met 
me, he quickly took in the situation and 
burst out laughing. A little praise, with 
the promise of a new hat, put me at ease. 
I could now sit down to admire my fish — 
a roach, it was called — which weighed 
about 2 pounds. 

Since that time, I have landed much 
larger fish from the same hole, yet the day 
I caught the roach is looked back to as a 
red letter day. 



BIG TROUT. 

Editor Recreation: I hand you here- 
with clippings from the Cincinnati " En- 
quirer " regarding trout and size of same. 

We are catching, daily, in Jackson's lake, 
all the trout we can use; fat and in fine con- 
dition, that weigh from 3 to 8^2 pounds and 
measure up to 27^ inches long. We use 
only pieces of meat or fish for bait, on a 
short piece of binding cord and a common 
hook. The lake. seems to be alive with 
trout. 

I notice they assume different shades of 
color. Those caught in shallow water, say 
2 feet deep, have a light yellow color and 
pale spots, and those taken from deep holes, 
near projecting banks, are deep green — al- 
most black on the back. Does light and 
shade have this effect on trout? 

B. Harris, Jackson, Wyo. 

The clipping above referred to says: 

Blaine County (Oregon) sportsmen are boasting of a re- 
cent catch of mountain trout, in Twin lakes at the head of 
the Malad, about 9 miles from Soldier, on Camas prairie. It 
was made bv Alexander Sifers, the sawmill owner. While 
fishing with hook and line, Mr. Sifers and associates hauled 
out 3 trout that weighed n^. tt, and 6' pounds, respect- 
ively, or an aggregate of 29 pounds. The big trout is beau- 
tifully speckled, with iridescent or "rainbow colored" 
sides ; is isf inches around the belly and i~]\ inches long. 
They are plump and fat as a fish a year old. 



Last fall a Boston paper published this 
item: 

T. D. Ketchen, of Boston, who is at Long Lake, in the 
Adirondacks, arranged last week a fishing contest, giving 
$50 for the largest number of fish and $5 for the largest 
pickerel caught. Guides Dunphy and Lafell won the 
prize for the largest number, 137, weighing 57 pounds. 
Cross and Girard took the prize for the largest pickerel, 
weighing n^ pounds. 

This is wrong. Side, or prize hunts, or 
fishing contests, of all kinds, are condemned 
by all true sportsmen. — Editor. 



Harbor Springs, Mich. 

Editor Recreation: No doubt F. D. C. 
was mad when he read W. G. E.'s letter. 
His reply indicates that. I have fished 
Maple river, near Petoskey, and have taken 
grayling, one after another, exceeding i 
pound and many that weighed 2 pounds 
each. While I have never taken trout and 
grayling at a single cast, I have taken them 
from the same pool. 

He says grayling leave as soon as trout 
come. This is true in part. Trout event- 
ually drive the grayling out, but not at 
once. Grayling have been taken, during 
the past season, from this stream, and trout 
have been there for 6 years, to my knowl- 
edge. 

If F. D. C. does not believe trout are 
taken in the vicinity of Petoskey, that weigh 
2 pounds each, I would request him to pay 
us a visit and I will show him a living 
specimen, taken from the " Minnehaha " 
last season, that will convince him he 
knows little about trout fishing hereabouts. 

Sinker. 



MAINE FISH NOTES. 

E. M. Blanding, of Bangor, has been 
supplied by the United States fish com- 
mission, and the Maine commissioners of 
inland fisheries and game, with about 5,000 
Swiss lake trout which have been placed in 
waters along the line of the Mt. Desert 
branch of the Maine Central Railroad, 
largely in Phillips lake, but a portion in 
Holbrook's pond. These trout were 
hatched at the U. S. hatchery in East Or- 
land and average upward of 3 inches in 
length. 

The guides and sportsmen of the locality 
have formed an organization at Sherman 
Mills, to be known as the " Southern 
Aroostook Sportsmen's Association." The 
following. officers were elected: President, 
P. E. Young; vice president, F. E. Robin- 
son; secretary, H. B. Sleeper; treasurer, 
C. A. Wren. * 

F. E. Eastman, of Portland, and C. D. 
Record of Readfield, Me., landed 12 trout, 
in Lake Maranacook, 3 of which weighed 
11 pounds, the larger weighing 4^2 pounds. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



59 



S. L. Small and Dana Crockett, of Dex- 
ter, caught, in the thoroughfare between 
Sugar Island and the mainland, 4 trout, the 
combined weight of which was 14 pounds. 
They weighed 5, 4%, 2 ] / 2 , 2% pounds re- 
spectively. 

C. C. Moore, of New York, enjoyed 
some good fly fishing, killing 12, 14 and 
even up to 30 trout a day. 

A laker weighing 29 pounds was captured 
off Norcross Brook. The Mohawk Fish- 
ing club also had good luck, taking 67 
trout in orfe day. 

Geo. Emmett, Attleboro, Mass., secured 
his full allowance and has the record for 
the largest square-tailer, thus far. It 
weighed 4^ pounds dressed. Mr. Em- 
mett fished most of the time off Green 
island. 

Over 100 landlocked salmon and trout 
were recently caught at Green lake, Me., 
in one day. 

John T. Clark, Geo. W. Harriman, A. C. 
Jerrard, F. T. Hall, E. J. Murch, S. A. 
Maxfield, Charles J. Hutchings, Dr. W. L. 
Hunt, Dr. C. P. Thomas, and B. L. Hex- 
ter, all of Bangor, were among the lucky 
anglers. 

On another day 6 salmon were landed, 
at the Bangor pool. E. A. Buck, Mr. 
Burnett, of Glasgow, Scotland, Archibald 
Mitchell, Judge Briscoe, John Porteous, 
and J. M. Johnson, all of Norwich, Conn.; 
J. H. Peavey and Samuel Drinkwater, of 
Bangor, were the winners in this sport. 

The eggs at the fish hatchery, in Liberty, 
are 'hatching finely, especially the trout 
eggs, and it looks as if there might be about 
12,000 trout and some 5,000 salmon to put 
into the lake, when large enough. 

Great catches are reported from Sebec 
lake. The Commissioners of Inland Fish- 
eries and Game visited the lake recently 
and report numerous catches of fine land- 
locked salmon. 

F. G. Kinsman and Dr. E. G. Briggs 
caught a fine string of fish at the same 
place. There were 18 bass weighing 43^2 
pounds. One of them weighed 4%. 

John Mayers, of Dresden, took a stur- 
geon from one of his weirs, which meas- 
ured 8 feet 2 inches in length. 

A. W. Thayer, Augusta, caught a square 
tailed trout, at Lake Cobbosseecontee, that 
weighed s l / 2 pounds. 

A shad weighing g l / 2 pounds was recently 
caught in St. John harbor. 



there is water enough, and known as the 
Order of Recreation Canoemen. I can 
think of nothing more pleasant than for the 
lodges, from 4 to 5 neighboring towns, to 
take an outing together on sorne lake or 
river. If this were done and the qualifica- 
tions for membership should be the same 
as in Walton, your subscription list would 
soon reach 100,000. Some time when you 
have a little extra space will you please 
mention this to your readers? I think it 
would pay. It would furnish sport and a 
very pleasant outing. 

M. Sheldon Brandt, Walton, N. Y. 

This is an excellent suggestion and I am 
deeply grateful to Mr. Brandt for it. I will 
gladly co-operate with any and all friends 
who may feel inclined to work on these 
lines. Editor. 



Perch fishing has been excellent in the 
vicinity of Little Falls, and near Four Mile 
run. Large strings have been taken. The 
fish, however, were rather small. 

Universal satisfaction is expressed with 
the new fish law. Everyone is anticipating 
an excellent bass season when it reopens. 
W r ith the number of bass transferred from 
the B. & O. canal to the river, we should 
have it. Local anglers had fine sport with 
the bass on the upper Potomac, before the 
season closed, April 15th. 

Large numbers of shad have been 
brought into the city. It is said this is the 
best season they have had for a number of 
years. E. G. H., Washington, D. C. 



I noticed in the April number of Rec- 
reation " F. D. C's." statement regarding 
trout and grayling in the vicinity of Petos- 
key. I also read " W. G. E's." statement 
and it is truthful in every particular. 

I am something of a fisherman myself. 
and have often caught 25 to 60 trout in a 
day, that would weigh from % pound up to 
2 pounds each, and have taken trout weigh- 
ing nearly 3 pounds. I have seen trout and 
grayling taken from the same pool, on more 
than one occasion. I have known of trout 
being caught, within 16 miles of Petoskey, 
that weighed over 3 pounds, and can pro- 
duce plenty of evidence to prove it. 

A. I. S., Petoskey, Mich. 



We have a canoe club here, named after 
your magazine. Why couldn't canoe clubs 
be organized in all of the places where 



The fishing season opened fairly well 
here. Several fine strings of trout were 
taken by local fishermen. West Hill pond, 
about 28 miles from here, # is becoming a 
popular resort; there being excellent 
shooting as well as fishing. Several new 
cottages have been built together. With 
the usual camping parties, there will be a 
large colony this season. 

E. B. G., Hartford, Conn. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



THE QUESTION OF THE DAY. 

J. A. MACKENZIE. 

What is the best gun, for the money? 
The man of limited means, who cannot af- 
ford to put more than $30 or $40 in a gun 
cannot go amiss if he buy one of the leading 
American guns, such as the Hollenbeck, 
Ithaca, Baker, etc. If anything goes wrong 
with one of these it is easy to right it, and 
their cheap grades will wear and shoot as 
well as their high priced. It is no lon- 
ger necessary to go abroad and pay $300 
in order to get a good reliable gun. Here 
in America are firms that turn out weapons 
that for strength, beauty and shooting 
qualities are the equals of imported guns 
at twice the price. The Ithaca, for close 
hard shooting, is the equal of foreign guns 
of 4 and 5 times the price; and in many 
cases it surpasses them. Where can you 
get, for 4 times the money, such simple, 
durable guns as the Syracuse Arms Com- 
pany turns out? 

Beware of the cheap shams manufactured 
in England and Belgium, for the American 
market. They are a disgrace to any dealer 
who handles them. Well do I remember 
my experience with them. My first shot 
gun was one of these, for which I paid $25. 
It shot fairly well but the locks were so soft 
and so poorly put together that they 
played out after every 200 or 300 shots, and 
the notches had to be filed deeper. Screws 
were constantly stripping and getting lost, 
causing no end of trouble. I was glad to 
get $10 for it; and now I place full con- 
fidence in my little Hollenbeck, made by 
the Syracuse Arms Company. 

I believe this Company makes the most 
thoroughly up to date gun on the Ameri- 
can market to-day. Here are my reasons 
for thinking so. It has fewer parts than 
any other, and simplicity is strength. The 
simple cross bolt, working on a vertical 
axis, is self tightening; takes up wear and 
passes clear through the extension rib into 
the other side of the frame, making a fas- 
tening that for- strength and durability is 
unsurpassed in any gun. By self tighten- 
ing I mean, as you will see by the cut, that 
it draws the barrels to the standing breech. 

This system of locking is becoming more 
popular every year. Shooters are begin- 
ning to feel the need of a more lasting and 
secure method of fastening the barrels to 
the standing breech, than the underbolt, 
even when combined with the doll's head 
extension rib, in order to withstand the 
tremendous strain of nitro powders, and 
not shoot loose. Many old reliable guns, 
that had been shot thousands of times with 
black powder and had remained tight, were 



turned into rattle traps by the new smoke- 
less powders, not to speak of several dan- 
gerous accidents. This was owing to the 
greater strain, at each discharge, which 
sprung the barrels from the standing 
breech. To overcome this difficulty gun- 
smiths have adopted two remedies, namely, 
leaving more metal at the angle of the 
frame, and making use of a top connection. 
Early in the 6o's Westly Richards brought 
out his doll's head extension rib, with slid- 
ing bolt engaging in a slot on its rear face. 
This was followed by Greener's cross bolt, 
which has come into so general use. This 
was a great improvement and his guns have 
a world wide reputation for durability or 
the power to withstand heavy charges. 
There is one serious drawback to this bolt, 
however. It does not draw the barrels to 
the breech and, if worn by the constant 
friction, would not hold them there. With- 
out that self tightening power that takes up 
wear no lasting durability can be had. 
Greener guns are, however, made of such 
excellent material, and are so nicely fitted 
together, that they have been fired thou-* 
sands of times without any perceptible 
wear. The doll's head extension rib exerts 
a holding force, especially if its anterior 
surface is an arc of a circle, of which the 
hinge pin is the centre. This is true so long 
as it fits the slot in the frame, and is held in 
position by a good underbolt; but the 
slightest wear on its bearing surface will 
allow the barrels to part from the breech 
and this renders it useless. Underbolts al- 
ways weaken the frame by cutting away 
the metal at the angle where the greatest 
strength is needed. Besides a great holding 
down force is not necessary, as has been 
proven time and again by discharging the 
gun when held in the hand, with the bolt 
withdrawn. Even if this force were needed 
the top connection has still far the best of 
the argument, for it acts nearly twice as far 
from the point of leverage. Consequent- 
ly, by the laws of forces, it will have twice 
the power. 

The adoption of smokeless powders has 
also brought about improvements in the 
appearance and balance of guns. It is well 
known that nitros exert a much greater 
bursting strain on the gun barrels than 
black powders; and various experiments 
have shown that this train comes mainly at 
the head of the cartridge chamber, where 
there is a sudden diminution in the thick- 
ness of the metal. If this part of the barrel 
is made sufficiently strong the remainder 
may be quite thin. In cylinder bored guns 
the muzzles may be left as thin as ordinary 
writing paper; but with full choked barrels 
more metal must be left at the cone of the 
choke to prevent its being shot out. Thus 



60 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



61 



the most of the metal is put at the breech 
end of the barrels, giving them a graceful 
taper and bringing the weight more be- 
tween the hands, making a much more 
handsome and finely balanced arm. 



J 



\ 




FULL SIZE CUT OF FRAME OF HOLLENBECK 
GUN, SHOWING POSITION OF CROSS-BOLT 
WHEN HALF DRAWN BACK, AND WHEN 
GUN IS CLOSED. 

But these are not all the changes made 
necessary by the new explosive. It was 
found that to give the best results the gases 
must be more confined, both in the cart- 
ridge cases and in the barrels. This is ac- 
complished by using plenty of heavy felt 
wadding, one size larger than the bore, in 
strongly crimped paper shells, and in nitro 
boring the guns. Guns thus bored are 
contracted more at the muzzle, and while 
giving good results, with small shot, are 
not always satisfactory with the larger 
sizes. Gunmakers are also boring their 
guns more true to gauge than formerly; 



so that a 12 gauge will take a No. 12 wad, 
or a 16 a No. 16. In the new vena contracta 
guns the bore is very much contracted, a 
gun taking a No. 12 shell gradually taper- 
ing down to a 20 bore and so continuing to 
the muzzle. It is claimed for them that 
they shoot as good as the ordinary 12 
gauge and are much smaller and lighter. 
The latest change I have heard of is the 
square muzzle, with which the inventor 




CROSS-SECTION, THROUGH ANGLE OF THE 
FRAME, OF GUN WITH UNDERBOLTS, 
SHOWING HOW THE METAL IS CUT 
AWAY. 

claims he can get better pattern and pene- 
tration than with the round; but this re- 
mains to be proven. 

As for repeaters, they are not the thing 
for brush and grouse shooting. The maga- 
zine full of cartridges, under the barrel, 
makes them clumsy and heavy to handle, 
especially in quick, snap shooting; and the 
manipulation of the repeating mechanism 
destroys the aim for the second shot. In 
grouse shooting, nowadays, more than 2 
shots in rapid succession can seldom be 
had, and it is a great advantage, in all up- 
land shooting, to have one barrel shoot 
close and the other open. For quail there 
is no better combination. On the bevy rise 
you get in your cylinder barrel and then 
have plenty of time to use the choked. Two 
cylinder barrels are not a bad combination, 
in the early season, as most of the birds 
can be shot within 25 yards; but in the cold 
blusterly days of November the full choked 
barrel will be taxed to the utmost. 

The little 16 bore is coming more in 
favor, for the little brown Bobs. It re- 
quires closer holding than the 12. The 
latter is none too large for the ruffed 
grouse, which need good hard hitting. 
With these birds most of the shots, in the 
early season, are at short range in dense 



62 



RECREA TION. 



cover; but even then many long shots 
are offered as an occasional bird sails off 
among the trees, or crosses from one cover 
to another. Late in the fall, when the birds 
are wilder and the woods more open, shots 
may be all the way from 15 to 60 yards. 
Even in woodcock shooting one frequently 
gets a long shot at an old cock, which, 
roused by the dog from the deep seclusion 
of his boring ground, darts in erratic flight 
over the tops of the willows, to be lost to 
view among the tremulous leaves of the 
aspens. 

I have never shot snipe, but from all ac- 
counts they have their wild and their slug- 
gish days, necessitating the use of a gun 
equally adapted for short or long range 
shooting. 

To sum up I would recommend, for up- 
land shooting, a 12 gauge, with 28 inch 
barrels; the right a cylinder and the left 
full choked; to weigh not more than 7^ 
pounds. Mine weighs 7, which is heavy 
enough to carry all day, over rough coun- 
try. If the sportsman can get a day or 2 
at ducks, every fall, or is fond of the traps, 
he had better get 30 inch barrels, with the 
right slightly choked. Of course the man 
who can afford 2 guns, or 2 sets of barrels, 
need not be hampered in this way. 

Whatever you do, get a stock to fit you. 
I use one 14^ inches long, with 3 inch 
drop. My height is a little over 6 feet. Go 
into some big establishment, where a large 
stock of guns is kept on hand, and try sev- 
eral. Fix your eyes on some small object 
and bring up the gun, without removing 
them from the mark. If the gun covers it 
correctly it is a fit. It is best to see about 
1-3 of the rib, from the muzzle; for then 
the gun will shoot a little high — a good 
fault if not overdone. 

The craze, nowadays, is for straight 
stocks, especially for trap shooting. It may 
be all right for pigeons, which rise fairly 
regular; or for men with supple necks; but 
for game you want such a stock that the eye 
will come naturally at the right height for 
correct aiming without taking any notice 
of the breech end of the barrels. When 
you have found such an one measure the 
drop at the butt, and the length from the 
fore trigger to the centre of the butt plate, 
and send your order to a reliable American 
firm, or place it with a responsible dealer, 
and you may rest assured you will get what 
you want. Most firms will send their guns 
C. O. D., allowing one day for trial, and 
will send a pattern and a written guarantee 
with them. If you are not satisfied all it 
will cost for the examination is the ex- 
pressage both ways. 

Will some fellow sportsman write an ar- 
ticle for Recreation about the relative 
toughness, durability, etc., of twist, Damas- 
cus, and steel barrels, and of the best 
methods of choking? 



RELOADING SMOKELESS SHELLS. 

Enterprise, Idaho. 

Editor Recreation: I have read with 
deep interest the reports given by several 
of your correspondents as to the accuracy 
and killing power of the new 30 caliber 
smokeless rifles. I cannot learn that any 
of them have ever tried reloading the am- 
munition. Where a man is so situated that 
he can get the cartridges when wanted it 
does not pay to reload; but we who live 
in the mountains, remote from railways and 
gun stores, are almost compelled to do so. 
My partner and I each own 30-30 smoke- 
less rifles. We wanted to reload our car- 
tridges and to use, in some of them, black 
powder and a hardened lead bullet, which 
would be equal to a reduced charge. These 
we would use for target practice, at short 
range, and for small game. 

Using the " Ideal " reloading tools we 
had been able to reload our 25-25 and 50-110 
cartridges perfectly and thought we could 
do so with the 30-30. At my request the 
Ideal Manufacturing Company made me a 
set of 20 caliber reloading tools that was 
perfection in its work, as are all their gun 
implements. We began our tests with 
FFG Dupont's rifle powder, and 160 grain 
bullets, one part tin to 12 parts lead. 

The result was a terrific recoil, a blowing 
off of the neck of the shell or a splitting of 
the shell clear to its base. As to accuracy 
the cartridges were all right and the pene- 
tration, at 30 yards, was 13 inches of green 
pine. The bullets would, however, occa- 
sionally turn over and strike sidewise. 

In the next lot we reduced the powder 
charge to 20 grains, which increased the 
trajectory and decreased the penetration 5 
inches. I then used soft lead bullets and 30 
grains of same powder, with same results as 
to recoil and bursting of shells. Then I 
used a no grain bullet and about 15 grains 
of powder, filling up the shell with saw- 
dust and seating the bullet down solid on 
top of it. At 50 yards this charge was 
fairly accurate and the penetration 4^ 
inches; but after one shot the shells were 
so swelled as to be unfit for further use. 

To sum up, the tests we were able to 
make were not at all satisfactory. This I 
conclude is caused by the rapid twist in the 
rifling of the nickel steel barrel. One pecul- 
iar feature was the twisting of the bullets. 
At least 1 in 8 turned over. 

The tests we~e made with both Winches- 
ter and Marliii 30-30 rifles, and with U. M. 
C. and Winchester shells. 

In a recent issue of Recreation I learn 
that cartridges for these rifles are now 
made with a reduced charge of smokeless 
powder, which will afford the proper results 
for target practice and small game shoot- 
ing. We have ordered a large supply of 
these and have given up all attempts at re- 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



63 



loading smokeless rifle shells. With good 
tools and a great deal of care ordinary rifle 
black powder shells can be reloaded to give 
good results, but no more second hand 
smokeless cartridges for me. 

The new smokeless rifles give us perfect 
satisfaction in every respect. We find them 
thoroughly effective on big game and shall 
use them exclusively, hereafter. Black 
powder guns are a thing of the past. The 
30 caliber shell, with soft nosed bullet, has 
about 3 times the killing power of a 50-110 
Winchester express and has none of the 
objectionable recoil and smoke. I am sure 
it will please all who give it a fair and im- 
partial trial. 

Now why can't we have a 22 caliber 
smokeless rifle, using about 10 grains pow- 
der and an 86 grain bullet, for small game 
and for target shooting? That would be 
about equal to our 25 and 32 caliber rifles, 
in range and effectiveness. 

M. W. Miner. 



I have owned or shot samples of all the 
better guns made in America, as well as 
several of English make, and find good 
shooting qualities in the Parker, Davis, 
Remington, Ithaca, Baker, Winchester, 
Lefever, Whitney and several others. The 
hardest hitting American gun I ever fired 
was a high grade Whitney safety gun. 

A short time ago I had the opportunity 
of targeting a high grade pigeon gun made 
by Wm. Cashmore, of Birmingham, Eng- 
land, for a Des Moines sportsman and can 
truthfully say, the Cashmore gun has the 
most remarkable shooting power I have 
ever found in any gun. For pattern, pene- 
tration, fine balance, close fitting joints, 
finish, and all that goes to make up a high 
grade arm, this Cashmore certainly leaves 
nothing to be desired. 

Your readers who desire to learn more of 
this make of gun, should write Mr. Cash- 
more, Steelhouse Lane, Birmingham, Eng- 
land, for a catalogue of his guns, mention- 
ing Recreation. 

C. H. Kessler, Des Moines, la. 



TESTING THE ARMY RIFLE. 

KANSAS CITY " STAR." 

The Krag-Jorgensen rifle, which has 
been adopted by the United States govern- 
ment, is not a humane weapon of war. It 
has been the belief of army officers and 
surgeons that the 30-caliber, steel-jacketed 
bullet which the Krag-Jorgensen shoots 
would either kill a soldier instantly or leave 
a wound which would enable him to fight 
on without knowing, for a long time, he had 
been injured. This theory was completely 
dissipated at a trial of the rifle made yester- 



day under the direction of Dr. J. D. Griffith, 
ex-surgeon general of the Missouri state 
militia. 

The test showed that at any distance un- 
der 1,000 yards the ball from this rifle rends 
human flesh, disintegrates human organs 
and shatters human bones into fragments. 
Beyond 1,000 yards — and the gun will carry 
3 miles and kill — the bullet bores a small 
round hole through bone or tissue. 

It will bore a hole through an oak tree a 
foot in diameter at a range of 2 miles; per- 
forate steel plates; plunge into solid earth a 
distance of 18 inches, after passing through 
a human body. Yet a small pile of loose, dry 
earth will arrest its flight and tear it into 
fragments. Scientists' explanations as to 
why this is so are very unsatisfactory, but 
all admit that it is true. To protect himself 
against the Krag-Jorgensen bullet, a soldier 
needs neither forts, trees, armor nor steel 
plates. He can dig up a pile of loose earth, 
18 inches in diameter, with his trowel bayo- 
net, and, lying behind this apparently inse- 
cure barrier, be assured that all the bullets 
fired at him will be flattened before they 
reach him. 

For the tests made yesterday a human 
head and several legs of human cadavers 
were used. The targets were placed in front 
of a high embankment and Dr. W. T. Stark 
and General Milton Moore, of the state 
militia did the shooting. They began at 500 
yards, and over 200 rounds were fired at 
various distances. 

One of the first bullets fired struck the 
head, just above the nose, at a range of 500 
yards. The skull was shattered as if it had 
been an egg shell and the bullet buried it- 
self in the embankment, where it was dug 
out later, as bright and perfect as when 
placed in the rifle. Other bullets pierced 
the skull and splintered the bone in radiat- 
ing lines. The bullets also tore the bones 
of the legs into long splinters. 

The test was to ascertain the effect of the 
bullets on human bones and it was proved 
that they would not bore small, clean holes 
through osseous substances, at less than 
1,000 yards. 

After the shooting at the parts of cadav- 
ers a few experimental shots were tried at 
loose and solid earth. Bullets fired into the 
solid earth went out of sight, but in loose 
dirt they were stopped within 2 feet. One 
bullet, fired from a distance of 20 yards, 
into a pile of loose earth, was found in the 
centre of the hillock. It was completely 
flattened and its steel jacket was twisted 
into a ragged shape. There was little re- 
sistance to the earth, as one could easily 
push a finger through it. 

Two Krag-Jorgensen rifles were used in 
the experiments, one the infantry gun and 
the other the cavalry carbine. The only 
difference between them is that the car- 
bine is a few inches shorter. They shoot 
with equal accuracy up to 500 yards. 



6 4 



RECREA TION. 



BLUING AND CASE HARDENING. 

Can you give a recipe for case-hardening 
or bluing, for the purpose of refinishing 
such smaller parts of guns and rifles as 
become worn bright, by use, and to restore 
their original color. G. U., New York. 

Answer. — For bluing, the general meth- 
od is to polish the metal thoroughly and 
then place it in heated charcoal, letting it 
rest awhile, well covered from the air. Then 
remove the metal and rub the surface down 
with waste; then put it back again and re- 
peat this operation 6 or 7 times, depending 
on the work. Finally the rich blue color 
will be obtained. 

For some of the small parts the method 
of " dipping " is also used, this being to 
dip the metal in a bath of saltpetre, man- 
ganese, etc. If it is a very small part, or 
only a portion of a part, the color can be 
brought back by placing in a gas flame. 
Heat it until it almost reaches the color you 
wish; then dip it in cold water. 

For general refinishing and re-bluing of 
parts, it is better to send them back to the 
factory. The cost of having parts re-blued 
would not be so great as the expense of 
making ready to do the work. Parts like 
sights, forearm tips, triggers, etc., you can 
probably bring back to a proper color in 
the gas flame. 

CASE HARDENING. 

The case hardening finish is obtained by 
the following process: The part is polished 
and then packed in burnt bone. This is 
usually placed in a cast iron box, and care 
should be taken to have the metal covered 
by the bone. The pieces of steel must not 
come in contact with each other. The box 
in which the work is placed, covered by the 
bone, is then placed in the furnace and 
heated red hot. Then the box is removed 
and the contents dumped in clear, cold 
water, running water being preferable. In 
order to give good colors a fairly large size 
of bone should be used — that is, say about 
the size of peas. Finer bone will harden as 
well, but will not give the colors. 



J. V., Cleveland, Ohio, asks for the opin- 
ions of some of the small bore cranks as to 
the best rifle for shooting the 22 short and 
long cartridge. 

I will recommend the Marlin every time, 
for accuracy, style and workmanship, an'd 
am glad to see it advertised in Recrea- 
tion. I have a Marlin repeater, model '92, 
32 caliber, using both center and rim-fire 
cartridges and fitted with Lyman com- 
bination front and rear sights. It is the 
most accurate rifle I ever saw. I can drive 
nails with it at 25 yards, and at 60 yards can 



hit V/2. inch pieces of paper nearly every 
time. 

I load my own shells, with a set of Ideal 
reloading tools, which are as near perfec- 
tion as any tools can be. 

If anyone wants an accurate rifle let him 
get a Marlin safety repeater, fitted with 
Lyman sights, and he will have an arm that 
will make him happy. 

Be sure to keep the rifle clean. For very 
close shooting I clean after each shot, with 
a clean woolen cloth. 

I have tried the square point, 32 caliber 
cartridge, that O. J. B. speaks of, and am 
convinced the killing power is very much 
increased by cutting off the end of the bul- 
let. The penetration is not so great but 
I think the shock, to whatever the ball hits, 
is greater; and it makes a hole as large as 
that of a 38 caliber conical bullet. 

Recreation grows better every month, 
and I am doing all I can to increase its 
circulation. F. E. B., Brimfield, Mass. 



Editor Recreation: I notice in Rec- 
reation one problem that has never been 
satisfactorily solved; and that is how a 
charge of shot can be held together and 
made to go in a solid body a certain dis- 
tance. I have given this subject careful 
thought and have spent a great deal of time 
experimenting on it. I have a 12 gauge 
gun that was once full choked, but; it never 
carried the shot close enough to satisfy me. 
I took the barrels in my shop, made a steel 
reamer and commenced scraping them in- 
side. I kept at it until I gave them a true 
taper, the variation being 1-16 of an inch 
from breech to muzzle, this being what I 
term a true taper choke. I have tested this 
gun with U. M. C. loaded shells, No. 4 shot 
and 3% drams powder. I shot at the end 
of a log, a foot in diameter, at 135 yards, 
placing 3 shot in the end of the log and 
several under it. I found, on the snow, the 
spread of the charge to be 4^2 feet. 

I think, therefore, a gun with a true taper 
choke will give any shooter perfect satis- 
faction. A friend who had a 12 gauge Win- 
chester shot gun made a shot at the end of 
the same log, with No. 8 shot, placed 4 
pellets in the end of the log and 20 under it. 
The spread was less than 4 feet. His gun is 
also a true taper choke. 

M. B., Conway Centre, N. H. 



L. H. B. says he would like to hear from 
hunters regarding the large bore rifles vs. 
45-90 and 50-110. I have been hunting 
since 1872 and have used all kinds of guns, 
from a 22 caliber to a 56 caliber. Am now 
using a 25-35 Winchester smokeless, and 
there are but 2 guns on the market that can 
beat it for stopping qualities. These are 
the 30-30 Winchester, or Marlin, and the 
30-40 Winchester. 

Two of my neighbors are using 30-30 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



<*5 



smokeless rifles. They first used the soft 
nosed bullet but soon dropped it on ac 
count of the great damage done to the 
meat; and are now using the full cased 
bullet. I have killed only 3 elk with my 
-5 _ 35> ? of which' dropped dead in their 
tracks. * The third fell when the ball hit 
him, but got up and ran 50 or 60 yards, 
when he fell dead. I shot 1 mule deer, that 
fell dead in 20 yards. Have also killed 4 
mountain goats, 2 of which were lying 
down and which never tried to get up after 
being hit. The other 2 were dead before 
they fell — to all appearances. 

I have been using this gun 5 months, and 
it is plenty good enough for me. I got 100 
cartridges with the gun and have 23 of them 
yet. Have shot a few at target and a good 
many at grouse. 

M. P. Dunham, Woodworth, Mont. 



TO REMODEL NAVY RIFLES. 

There is said to be a great deal of dissat- 
isfaction in the service against the new .236 
calibre rifle, in use in the navy. The ex- 
perimental weapons shot well at first, but 
after a few rounds the bullet began to 
strip, and, of course, to fly wild. 

This it is said is caused by the tremen 
dous pressure set up in the narrow bore by 
the large charge of nitro powder, the long, 
heavy bullet, and the sharp twist of the 
grooves. This pressure averages 56,000 
oounds to the square inch, and is sufficient, 
after a few shots, to permanently expand 
the barrel. As it was found impossible to 
prevent this in any barrel of permissible 
weight, the naval authorities have been 
compelled to lighten the bullet from 135 
grains to 115 grains, although this will se- 
riously impair the penetration and range of 
the rifle. 

In spite of these drawbacks the lighter 
bullet will have some advantages. For in 
stance, its initial velocity will be increased 
from 2,460 feet to 2,550 feet a second, which 
will flatten the trajectory, during the first 
500 yards of its flight; but owing to its 
relative lack of momentum, it will lose 
velocity far more quickly than the longer 
one; hence its range will be shorter and its 
flight more curved at all ranges over 500 
yards. 

Happily there is no dissatisfaction felt re- 
garding the action of the Naval Board. 
The American Lee straight pull rifle has 
undoubtedly the best military action in the 
world, and should the .236 bore fail to give 
satisfaction it would be an easy matter, al- 
though perhaps an expensive one, to re- 
place the first issue of arms by rifles of 
larger calibre. — New York Herald. 



with the various .30 calibre rifles and 
smokeless powder, by sportsmen hunting 
large game. Everyone who has an oppor 
tunity to observe the practical working of 
these new rifles and ammunition should re- 
port his experience to Recreation for the 
benefit of less fortunate brother sportsmen. 

The points on which there are conflicting 
opinions about the .30 calibre rifles arc: 
their accuracy at long range; their killing 
power on large game and their general 
value as a sportsman's weapon. For such 
game as antelope, elk and bear the 30-40 
ought to be most desirable, for it has great 
power; yet this cartridge is the one about 
which there seems the most difference of 
opinion. 

I see the charge of powder variously 
stated as 36, 40 and 44 grains and would 
request someone who knows, to say just 
what the U. S. Government 30-40 cartridge 
is loaded with, viz., how many grains of 
powder and of what make. M. K. B. 



Will you please ask, in Recreation, if 
any reader can give me any knowledge of 
the shooting powers of the Savage small 
bore rifle? I am in a quandary as to what 
rifle to buy for shooting big game. I have 
seen the Winchester and the Savage rifles 
(small bore) but have never seen any one 
use either; so would like to hear from any 
one in regard to the Savage rifle, in par- 
ticular; also if any reader can tell me if 
the soft nose bullet is more effective than 
the solid bullet. 

I am deeply interested in your wonderful 
little magazine. It is a prize to sportsmen, 
and the only trouble I find is waiting for it, 
from one month to another. I have it all 
read through, long before it is time for an- 
other. Guns and 'ammunition is the first 
department I strike for, and I wish there 
were lots more on that subject. Am show- 
ing your magazine to all my friends who I 
think have the least spark of a sportsman's 
enthusiasm about them, and hope Recrea- 
tion will reach the millions, which it will 
if given justice. 

G. R. Roberts, Northfield, Vt. 



North Platte, Neb. 
Editor Recreation: I have been deeply 
interested in the reports of results obtained 



J. V., Cleveland, Ohio, asks for the opin- 
ion of small-bore rifle cranks, as to the gun 
for using the 22 short and 22 long car- 
tridges. I have used a number of 22 calibre 
rifles, from the best makers, and find they 
all shoot accurately the cartridge designed 
to be used in them. From my experience 
the best rifle, containing the least number 
of parts, easiest of action, and simplest of 
construction, that will handle, with accu- 
racy, the 22 short, long, and long rifle 
cartridges, is the Marlin repeater, model 
'92. I use one of these, equipped with 
Lyman combination rear sight and ivory 
hunting front sight, and want nothing bet- 
ter. S. E. O., Fort Scott, Kans. 



66 



RECREATION. 



I should like to say to A. H. W., Amaril- 
lo, Texas, that I once owned a lever action 
Winchester repeating shot gun and liked it 
very much. I now own a model '93 and 
don't want anything better. They shoot 
as hard and as close as any gun I ever saw. 
One of my friends says he is bound to have 
one this fall, if it is to be had. I have shot 
both large and small shot out of mine, but 
would not recommend larger than No. 6 
for a full choked gun. 

T. A. H., Burnet, Tex. 



Will you kindly tell me if, in your esti- 
mation, a 22 calibre rifle would be injured 
by shooting B.B. caps in it? 

Ans. — It certainly would. The fulminate 
in the caps attacks the steel and rapidly de- 
stroys it. If the use of these caps be ex- 
tensive, this chemical action will continue 
and the barrel will, in time, be badly eaten 
out. I spoiled a good rifle in this way be- 
fore I learned what I now know on this 
subject. Editor. 



In answer to A. H. W., Amarillo, Texas, 
I would say that for the last 22 years I have 
been using both shot gun and rifle, of many 
different makes, and for the last 3 years I 
have used a Winchester repeating shot gun, 
of 12 gauge, with 3% drams powder and iy& 
ounce No. 8 shot. I have killed game with 
this gun at 127 yards. It is also the best 
gun at the trap I have ever used. In fact 
it is superior to any gun I have ever seen. 
Chas. T. Pinkham, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



I have just found that a 16 gauge shell 
fits nicely inside a 12 gauge, and would like 
to ask, through Recreation, if a 16 gauge 
shell, with base cut off, would not make a 
good shot case, for long range shooting. 
If it would go solid for 30 yards, why would 
it not be as good as a cut shell? My idea 
is to take a No. 16 shell, cut off the base, 
put in the shot, wad both ends, load in a 
12 gauge shell and shoot from a 12 gun. 

E. R., Newton Centre, Mass., Box 109. 



I should like to hear, through the col- 
umns of Recreation, from any one who 
has had experience with the new model '95 
Winchester, 40-72-330, box magazine re- 
peating rifle. Should like to know if they 
are thought nearly as effective on large 
game, such as bear or moose, as the 45-70 
'86 model. 

H. M. Bacon, Newton, Mass. 



Replying to P. J. M.'s question, in Rec- 
reation, as to Lyman sights: I have used 
a set of these on my rifle with marked sue- 
Any man can, with a little practice, 



accurately but much more quickly and 
easily than with any other sight I know of. 

" Bang." 



I would like to hear from some of the 
brethren, through Recreation, who have 
used both 12 and 16 gauge guns, as to the 
killing power of each. I do not know which 
to buy, a 12 or a 16 gauge. Will someone 
kindly enlighten me? 

J. A. B., Osage, la. 



G. W. Denton, Roswell, New Mex., 
claims to have one of the first guns the elder 
Greener ever made. It is a double gun — 
1 shot barrel and 1 rifle — the latter under 
the former. It is said to have been owned, 
at one time, by Abraham Lincoln. 



How well will the Winchester shot gun, 
cylinder bore, 12 gauge, shoot a solid, 
round ball? In firing rapidly, at game, 
with black powder, does the smoke ob- 
struct the vision? How well, does the cyl- 
inder bore shoot small shot? 

- Rifle Crank. 



cess. 



if he follow the instructions given in Ly- 
man's catalogue, not only shoot much more 



WEN' DE OL' HOUN BAYS. 

W. A. KEICKHAM. 

Oh de stars is jes' a crinklin' 
But de moon is in de dark; 
De sly ole coon's a-runnin' 
So you listen an' you hark, 
Wen de ol' houn bays. 

De pups is runnin' rabbits, 
Cos a pup ain't got no sense; 
OF coon is jes' a laffin', 
Cos de show aint done commence 
'Till de ol' houn bays. 

Dar's a hummin' in de tree tops 
An' a ripplin' in de run, 
An' it only lacks de music 
Dat's pretty nigh begun, 
Wen de ol' houn bays. 

Oh, Glory! did you hear it? 
Oh, Marser! hear it ring; 
It's as meller as de Autumn 
An' as welcome as de Spring, 
Wen de ol' houn bays. 

Dey ain't no music like it 

Fer dese ol' ears o' mine; 

It tingles in de fingers 

An' it warms de heart like wine 

Wen de ol' houn bays. 

De yeller gals low laffin', 
Wen de moon is in de full, 
Is pretty nigh to music; 
But to feel de heart strings pull, 
Hear de cl' houn bay. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



A GULL'S FUNERAL. 

Gulls have funerals. I have seen one of 
their funerals myself. My home was, a little 
time ago, in what was then the Hotel Im- 
perial, at the corner of 12th Street and 
Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. From the 
upper stories of this hotel an outlook was 
had over the water area to the North in 
front of the heart of the city, and of down- 
town Michigan Avenue, where many of the 
great hotels are located. In this water- 
front area many breakwaters run out here 
and there, but the gulls do not mind break- 
waters. They hover in vast numbers above 
the lake close to Chicago; for from Chi- 
cago's outlets comes the food which gives 
sustenance to hordes of them. They are 
wonderful, these gulls. Cold does not af- 
fect them, for they are on the ice-cakes 
all winter and feed on what drifts to them. 
They swoop all about, up and down, 
as cheerful as they were in the warmer 
months. But this is not a story of their 
life or nesting, and departure and breeding. 
It is but the account of one of their funerals. 

One Sunday I saw a group of what are 
called " toughs " creep out along the break- 
water. One of them had a gun. He shot 
into a group of hovering gulls, of which 
there were myriads dipping up and down 
in front of the Michigan Avenue fine hotels. 
He hit and crippled a gull and it fell, 
shrieking, into the water. Immediately all 
the other gulls flew away out over the lake, 
but the wounded bird did not cease its 
clamor. The ruffian who had shot it clam- 
bered from the breakwater into a boat and 
rowed out clumsily and, finally, caught the 
crippled thing, pulled it into his boat and 
killed it. 

Then followed something curious. The 
host of gulls came sweeping back and 
swirled about above where the city brute . 
was rowing back with the dead gull lying, 
wings outspread, beside him, in the boat's 
bottom. They gave utterance to cries quite 
unlike those they ordinarily make along the 
Chicago water-front and, though short, as 
understandable as the notes of the Dead 
March in Saul. Then, gradually, they rose 
higher and higher. They rose until there 
were thousands of thern flitting back and 
forth vainly together, at a height of per- 
haps 800 feet. Suddenly there seemed to 
come to them some sense of order. They 
rose, together, very high, swinging about 
each other as they rose and giving utter- 
ance to a strange, protesting cry. They 
paid no more attention to the man rowing 
along with the dead bird in the boat. They 
began to circle and still to rise until it was 
hard to distinguish them apart and then 
began to swing in circles like poised hawks, 



the whole open mass of them all the time 
drifting away slowly to the Southwestward 
until they were lost in the blaze of the 
light of the early afternoon. That was the 
first gull funeral I ever saw. 

The other day I saw the same thing again, 
although the gulls seemed to circle indi- 
vidually on this occasion, till as they came 
together, like swinging hawks, about 2,000 
feet above the city's roofs, they swung off 
again, far up in the sky, toward the South- 
west, floating like a group of buzzards. I 
suppose that, an hour or two later, they 
came to the lake again, because the funeral 
was over. 

This all seems odd and unnatural, but, 
let anyone shoot a gull on Lake Michigan, 
in front of Chicago, and see what will hap- 
pen! Is the same phenomena noted on the 
sea-coast, or do only the inland gulls have 
these sky-seeking funerals? What does it 
all mean? 



WOMEN TO THE RESCUE. 

It is a matter of comfort and congratula- 
tion that a movement to protect our singing 
and other native birds has been inaugurated 
which promises to bring a permanent re- 
sult. The old Audubon Society which, for 
a time, accomplished much good, both in 
the East and West, had, somehow, failed in 
energy and, within the last year or two, 
cheap bird butchers have slain robins, 
and orioles and purple wing blackbirds 
(grakles) and bluebirds, and others of our 
common birds, by thousands and tens and 
hundreds of thousands. These were for the 
decoration of women's bonnets. There is 
likely to be a change now and a permanent 
one. The women's clubs of the country 
are actively engaged in the reform and, as 
they include the leading women of the 
greatest cities and towns of the country, 
the crusade is likely to affect the trades- 
men and stop the slaughter. As the kill- 
ing has been done in nesting-time, when 
birds' plumage is at its best, each bird killed 
has meant the starving to death of a nest- 
ful; and so the decrease in bird life has been 
enormous. Now there will be a change. 
At the head of the movement is Miss Ada 
C. Sweet, late President of the Chicago 
Woman's Club, and all, or nearly all the 
women's clubs in the country seem re- 
sponding to the movement. Mrs. Ellen M. 
Henrotin, President of the National Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs, is not less ear- 
nest, and the leading women of the country 
seem banding together, everywhere, to 
bring an end to the infamous and cruel 
fashion. 

It is matter of congratulation that the 



67 



68 



RECREA TION. 



sportsmen's clubs — for there is no greater 
lover of birds than the real sportsman — are 
joining in the movement. The Illinois 
Sportsmen's Association has already passed 
resolutions in approbation of and promis- 
ing support to the new movement; and, no 
doubt, other sportsmen's clubs will follow. 
After all, we may keep our native birds as 
the country grows. The women can ac- 
complish much when they stop to think, 
and do as their kind hearts really dictate. 



JOIN THE ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Recreation believes the New York 
Zoological Park is bound to be a grand 
success. It is skilfully planned, wisely 
managed, and is therefore worthy of uni- 
versal support. Moreover, it is to be de- 
veloped on entirely new lines, and the 
genuine American originality in the idea 
should commend it to, every man who is 
proud of this nation. 

To build an ideal Zoological Park, such 
as this will be in 3 years, requires a lot of 
money. The city furnishes the land, which 
is worth $1,000,000. It also furnishes $125,- 
000 in cash, for ground improvements, and 
an annual maintenance fund starting at 
$60,000. The Society must raise $250,000, 
by subscription, to be used in erecting 
buildings, and in the purchase of the orig- 
inal outfit of animals. For the money with 
which to issue its publications, promote 
animal painting and sculpture, establish a 
fine zoological library and a collection of 
pictures, run its " Members' Building " 
and do a host of other good things, the 
Society must rely solely on the annual dues 
of its members. 

We need, and must have, at least 2,000 
annual members, paying $10 each per an- 
num; and Recreation is helping to get 
them. All readers who are interested in 
the work of the Zoological Society are in- 
vited to become members, and to help push 
the work. Full information, and blank ap- 
plications for membership, will be fur- 
nished by Recreation, on request. Let 
me hear from you. 

The following shows what the officers 
of the Society think of Recreation's ef- 
forts in this direction : 

New York Zoological Society, 
New York, May 11, 1897. 
Editor Recreation: On behalf of the 
Executive Committee of the New York 
Zoological Society, permit me to thank 
you most sincerely for your very helpful 
interest in the proposed Zoological Park, 
and for the 15 good men who have joined 
the organization through your personal 
solicitation. Such hearty co-operation is 
very encouraging. It is of the kind that 



will eventually make the Society a great 
power in the field of Zoology, and its 
Zoological Park a crowning success. 

A few years hence, when we are on the 
flood tide of prosperity, and in shape to 
offer substantial returns to every member, 
we will have members in plenty; but it is 
the men who come in now — at the be- 
ginning — who are willing to take us " on 
trust " for a year or 2, and who help us 
to start the ball rolling, that we will always 
appreciate most highly. The Zoological 
Park is going to be a big thing, a magnifi- 
cent institution; something that millions 
of people will be proud of! The public 
cannot begin to realize how fine and how 
delightful, to every sense, it is going to be 
until it is in our power to make a visible 
demonstration of it. Again thanking you, 
cordially, I am 

Yours very truly, 
William T. Ho.rnaday, Director. 



AN ANTELOPE AND A GRIZZLY. 

I wish to ask for the measurements of the 
largest antelope head known. I have an 
unmounted head that measures as follows: 

Length of left horn 13^4 inches. 

Length of right horn .- 13 

Spread of horns at tips 8^2 " 

Spread of horns at widest part ..11 

Length of skull 13 

Circumference of horns 5 

It was killed in 1894 by my father. 

I also wish to know the measurements of 
the largest bear on record. 

A silver-tip was killed in the fall of 1895, 
by Jas. R. Morganidge, the fresh skin of 
which measured as follows: from tip of 
nose to tip of tail, 8 feet 6 inches; across 
the fore legs, 9 feet 4 inches; between the 
ears, 9 inches; from between the ears to 
end of nose, 18 inches. This hide was not 
stretched to make it measure more. It was 
measured lying loose on the ground, after 
having lain there over night, which would 
make it shrink. The measurements are ex- 
act, for I made them myself. 

A mule deer was shot near our house that 
weighed 182 pounds after its entrails were 
taken out and its head cut off. 

John E. Brock, Maysworth, Wyo. 

In regard to measurements of prong- 
horn antelope • heads, and of silver-tip 
grizzlies, the readers of Recreation have 
the floor. It is greatly to be regretted that 
Master John could not have had an op- 
portunity of measuring the dead grizzly in 
the flesh, for he is evidently a careful ob- 
server, and one of the kind whose measure- 
ments and notes are valuable. Editor. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



6< 



THE BAND-TAILED PIGEON. 

(Cohtniba fasciata). 

The boys here have been having lots of 
fun with wild pigeons, but do not kill many, 
for they are difficult to approach. I am 
positive in regard to the birds being wild 
pigeons, for I have killed a good many 
during the years I have handled a scatter 
gun, my first ones being killed on the 
Salinas river, Monterey County, Cal. 

One day I saw a flock go over here that 
I think 1 am safe in saying contained 1,000 
birds. They come from the mountains (the 
Sierra Nevadas) nearly every spring, stay 
until about the 15th of April, and then go 
back. 

Have taken 2 pictures of the birds, and if 
negatives develop properly will send you 
one. De Witt Salisbury, Chico, Cal. 

The interesting notes printed above refer 
to a bird almost unknown East of the Mis- 
sissippi, save to naturalists. The species 
referred to is not the spike-tailed " passen- 
ger pigeon," once so common throughout 
the Mississippi valley, but the " band-tailed 
pigeon," having a blunt tail with a black 
band across the middle of it. It is one of 
the largest of American wild pigeons, and 
its home is the Pacific coast region West 
of the Rocky mountains, from the State of 
Washington to Arizona, Mexico and Gua- 
temala. Editor. 



robes "(untanncd) to the Hudson Bay Fur 
Company, at Winnipeg, at $20 each. Good 
tanned robes were then purchasable in 
Minneapolis, Montreal and New York, at 
prices ranging from $20 to $35, according 
to si/e and quality. EDITOR. 



HOW MANY? 

How many buffalo are left in the United 
States, and what is a genuine buffalo robe 
worth? H. J. A., St. Mary's, Kan. 

I assume your inquiry relates to wild 
buffaloes. There are now but 3 small bands 
of wild buffaloes alive on the whole North 
American Continent. In Yellowstone Park 
there are barely 30 head (some say not 
so many). There are 15 or 20 head in Lost 
Park, Colorado, and perhaps 150 head 
in the British Possessions, Southwest of 
Great Slave lake. Within 2 years more, the 
heads and hides of all those now alive, in 
Yellowstone Park, will be in the hands of 
the human hyaenas who hang around the 
Park, and who in 6 years have reduced the 
Park herd from 300 head to 30, or less. 

Buffalo robes have not half the value that 
most people suppose. In 1888 25 good 
robes were thrust into my hands (without 
my consent) to be sold. New York fur 
dealers would not touch them at any price, 
because the buffalo robe was no longer " in 
the market," or in demand; and the deal- 
ers did not care to create a demand when 
there were only 25 robes with which to 
supply it. Finally I succeeded in selling the 



RABBITS CAN SWIM. 

I have heard a number of sportsmen say 
they never knew of a rabbit taking to water 
and swimming; but I have known of an 
instance. One day in summer, a few years 
ago, while Charley Dodge and A. M. Tufts, 
of Lynn, Mass., were fishing on Spring 
Pond, near Lynn, they saw a creature 
swimming. At first they thought it a musk- 
rat; but somehow it seemed to act dif- 
ferently. 

By way of experiment, Dodge clapped 
his hands loudly, when up went Bunny's 
big ears — and gave him away! At once the 
boys pulled after him, and he began to 
swim for dear life. 

The rabbit reached the shore ahead of his 
pursuers, who naturally thought he would 
vanish instantly, and be seen no more. 
But such was not the case. When my 
friends reached the shore, they found Bun- 
ny lying there soaking wet, quite exhausted, 
and unable to run away. They picked him 
up, looked him all over, dried out his fur, 
and finally put him down, when away he 
went. 

Now that rafrbit took to the water of his 
own accord, and at the place where he went 
in, the pond was over 200 yards wide. This 
is the only case of the kind I know of, but 
it proves that rabbits can swim. 

H. M. G., Morrisonville, Vt. 



J. R. Bennett and E. E. Darrow, while 
cutting wood on a farm 2 miles Southwest 
of town, made an interesting discovery. In 
the heart of a pine tree, 4 feet in diameter, 
and embedded in the solid wood, they found 
the nest and the shriveled remains of 2 birds 
which, from their appearance, had been 
yellowhammers; but unlike the toad that is 
found, at stated intervals, imbedded in the 
solid rock, the birds were dead. Although 
the tree had grown over solidly, there were 
traces of a hole having been there when it 
was small. 

Estimating the time by the growth over 
the hole, the birds must have taken their 
last peep out about the time the Astor party 
went by, on their way to Astoria, and hav- 
ing missed the train, had to walk. The re- 
mains of the flickers look a good deal like a 
mummy, and there is a sad expression lin- 
gering about their eyes that suggests long 
years of waiting. 

Garfield (Wash.) " Enterprise." 




^'r^v^^^^^^^^^S-t. 1 ^ 



A CURIOSITY. 

On October 20th, 1871, a farmer living in 
Lake County, Indiana, shot a brant and on 
picking it up remarked to his companion 
that it must have " fallen on a snag." Fur- 
ther examination, however, revealed the 
fact that the supposed snag, which pro- 
truded from either side of the breast, was a 
bone arrow head, 9 inches in length and Y% 
of an inch in width. The brant had carried 
this weapon so long that it was as firmly im- 
bedded in bone and flesh as though nature 
had intended it as a part of the anatomical 
structure of the bird. 

Where the arrow passed through the 
bone, a callous growth tightened about it 
and the skin was smoothly drawn where 
the ends were exposed to view. A strange 
part of the story is, that the bone arrow- 
head is of Eskimo make, such as those 
people employ in bringing down birds, 
and use nowhere outside of the Arctic 
regions. 

This goes to prove that the bird was at 
one time a resident of that country. When 
shot by the Indiana farmer the brant was in 
fine condition and was the sturdy leader of 
a flock. 

While the wound was not in a vital part 
it is likely that if the arrow point had been 
made of steel or other metal the bird would 
have died from blood poisoning. 



A FISH DUCK. 

Will you kindly tell 
;»:-" me the name of duck I 
shot awhile ago. It was 
a female, with greenish 
black head, which color 
extended half way down 
the neck, there changing 
to pure white on upper 
part of breast. The 
,. lower breast was a sal- 
•/' mon color being quite 
ruddy. The back, ex- 
cepting a little of the 
part above the wings, 
and strictly a part of the 
neck, which was white, 
was a jet black. On 
each side of the tail the 
feathers were gray. The 
tail and wings were gray 
with the exception of the 
tertiary feathers, which 
were pure white with a single thread of black 
extending through each feather. The bird 
weighed 5 pounds, is what is known in our 
town as " the black and white duck." 

Is either this or the black duck considered 
edible ? G. E. H., Ware, Mass. 

I referred this matter to Mr. Robert 
Ridgway, Curator of Ornithology in the 
National Museum, and he says the bird 
seems to be a male fish-duck {Merganser 
americanus). It is not likely it could have 
been a female, as no female duck ever nor- 
mally takes those colors. He requests Mr. 
Holmes to state whether this duck had a 
long, narrow bill. If so, then it was a fish- 
duck and is not good to eat. 



V 



y 



\# 



Editor Recreation: I wish to report to 
you a strange freak of the pewee, or phcebe 
bird. On a beam in the shed that joins my 
mill, a phcebe bird is building a lot of nests, 
13 in number, all joining together, in all 
stages of construction! Some are almost 
finished and some just commenced. I see 
only one bird at work. I have never seen 
or heard of any such a freak before. The 
shed is new, having been built 2 years ago. 
Last summer there was a nest near by in 
which 2 broods were raised, one in May, 
and one in July. I thought that uncom- 
mon. H. M. Gordon, Morrisville, Vt. 



70 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



7* 



THE NEW YORK WORLD'S 
" MOOSE." 

Judging from things seen and heard, it 
may be said that in spite of all the efforts 
of Recreation, many American editors are 
fast losing all the grip on zoology they ever 
had. Not long since, a certain magazine 
published a picture of a saw-fish, and called 
it a " sword-fish." Now comes the New 
York World, with a scare-head description 
of the " Antlers of a Moose King," giving 
elaborate measurements and a picture la- 
beled " The King of the Moose," but the 
picture shows the head of — a caribou! 

In the latest Sportsmen's Exposition, an 
enterprising taxidermist handed out thou- 
sands of copies of a beautifully printed 
pamphlet containing, among other illustra- 
tions, a fine picture of a Virginia deer head 
legended " Black-tail Deer." 

But mistakes will happen. Once upon a 
time a man I know (who even then thought 
himself a bit of a naturalist), superintended 
the making up of an Exposition pyramid 
of big game, and when the workmen put 
the (adjustable) antlers on the moose, with 
the right antler on the left side, and the left 
on the right, neither the naturalist, nor any 
other man. noticed it for a whole week! 



I note your comment on the report of 
the musk ox hide which C. F. Periolat, of 
Chicago, received. He says it was killed 
near the mouth of the Yukon ri^er, Alaska, 
and that it took 6 months' trave. 1 to get it 
out. It is strange that men will make such 
statements in this enlightened age. Boats 
from the mouth of the Yukon reach here in 
20 days, instead of in 6 months. So fai as 
known, there never was a musk ox killed 
or seen in Alaska. The skin Periolat re- 
ceived came down on a whaler from the 
mouth of the Mackenzie river, to San Fran- 
cisco, and was bought by C. D. Ladd of 
that city, who in turn sold it to Periolat. 

I bought 35 musk ox skins that came 
down on the same vessel. 

W. F. Sheard, Tacoma, Wash. 



I certainly agree with J. C. D., Jr., Steam- 
boat Springs, Colo., who writes in Rec- 
reation, differing from Dr. Merriam re- 
garding the cry of the mountain lion. My 
experience, as reported in " Science," 
March 20, 1896, is that the cry, if not ex- 
actly blood-curdling, is most decidedly 
" unpleasant," as J. C. D. expresses it, and 
when once heard, in close quarters, will not 
soon be forgotten. 

Meriden S. Hill, Tacoma, Wash. 



In the May number of Recreation, on 
page 381, G. S. G. gives measurements of 
deer horns. I have a pair which I secured 



.iear the Black canyon of the Gunnison, 
which spread 36 inches. They are smooth 
and even and have 5 points on each side. 

I also secured a pair in the velvet, which 
had 15 points on one, and 17 on the other. 
They were the heaviest deer horns I ever 
saw and spread about 32 inches. 

J. D. S., Argentine, Kans. 



In reply to N. H. H.'s question as to the 
biggest coon — I would say that of 30 or 
more I have caught each season, for the 
last 4 or 5 years, the heaviest one I have 
weighed, tipped the scales at i8y^ pounds. 
Had this one been caught 6 weeks later he 
would probably have weighed 4 or 5 pounds 
more. A friend of mine claimed to have 
captured one that weighed 26 pounds and 
several that went better than 20 pounds. 
G. W. C, Rushville, N. Y. 



I do a great deal of coon hunting around 
here, having caught 20 coons last fall. 
There was but one large one among them. 
It was a buck and he weighed 30 pounds. 
I caught him in September and he was 
poor. Game is scarce around here. There 
are a few quails and pheasants and plenty 
of gray squirrels and rabbits. 

H. P., Wellsville, O. 



The way you roast the game hogs is 
simply great. Give it to them, as often and 
hard as you can. I hope those Wisconsin 
slaughterers will come to their senses and 
never again lend themselves to such con- 
temptible work, much less boast of it after- 
ward. Success to you and to the only 
sportsmen's magazine in the country. 

B. F. C, Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



On May 1, a Urge moose visited the 
farm of J. C. Haivey, Fort Fairfield, Me. 
When first seen he was within a few rods 
of the buildings, but on being discovered 
he trotted leisurely across the field, lightly 
skimmed a wire and picket fence and dis- 
appeared ir? the woods. 



Will Shawantum please inform us in 
what part of the United States female gray 
squirrels are heavy with young " late in the 
fall." S. F. D., Amarillo, Texas. 



" Men are so strange." 
" Yes." 

" George used to raise Cain when he had 
to walk the floor with baby " 

;;weii?" 

" But now that he is raising chickens he 
turns out at 4 o'clock to look after the in- 
cubator, without a murmur." 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



HOW TO CIVILIZE THEM. 

Game protective associations, or othei 
sportsmen's clubs that have for their object 
the protection of game and fish, can do 
nothing that will more effectually carry out 
their purpose than to extend the circulation 
of this magazine among men and boys who 
are known to be violators of fish and game 
laws. Every sportsman who reads Rec- 
reation, will, I believe, agree with me in 
this statement. Recreation is constantly 
endeavoring to elevate the tone of sports- 
manship and to promote public sentiment 
in favor of game protection. It is denounc- 
ing men who slaughter fish and game, 
roundly and unmercifully, and no man or 
boy, who has any sense of shame or of 
honor, can read 3 consecutive issues of it 
without feeling a strong inclination to re- 
spect the game laws, in future. 

Many instances have come to my per- 
sonal knowledge of men or boys who, be- 
fore becoming acquainted with this maga- 
zine had been ruthless destroyers of fish 
and game; who had boasted of their big 
bags at every opportunity, and who now 
state, frankly, that they will never again 
be guilty of such conduct. They say they 
will hereafter observe the laws; that they 
will practise moderation in their shooting 
and fishing; that they will advise others to 
do so, and that they will, in all cases, dis- 
courage and condemn the very kind of 
work they had heretofore been guilty of. 

If you cannot get the pot hunter, or the 
pot fisher, to subscribe for Recreation, 
send it to him anyway, and either pay for 
it yourself, or have your club pay for it. 
In this way, you will sow the seed of game 
protection where it could scarcely be ex- 
pected to reach in any other way. Even 
the game wardens have great difficulty in 
finding and arresting the men and boys 
who do the greatest mischief; but if Rec- 
reation were placed in their hands every 
month, they would take it with them into 
their cabins and would read it while the 
game wardens are asleep. After reading 
a few issues, the game officers would have 
no further occasion to hunt these men. 



The August number of Recreation will 
contain an interesting story by Geo. G. 
Cantwell descriptive of a catboat cruise on 
Puget Sound; another by Captain H. Ro- 
meyn on " A Buffalo Hunt in Kansas," 
some stirring reminiscences of early days 
at old Fort Smith, on the Big Horn, by 
Major E. R. P. Shurley; the record of an 
exploring trip in the Olympic mountains, 
by F. J. Church; a fishing yarn by J. L. 
Litman and a cycling story by Thos. Cun- 
ningham. 



Another series of Carlin's wonderful live 
wild animal photos, and another install- 
ment of the prize winning photos will be 
published, as also several original draw- 



ings. 



Ask all your friends to answer all the 
puzzles in Recreation. The more an- 
swers sent in the better, for all concerned. 

The time for answering puzzle No. 1, in 
May Recreation, is extended to July 31. 
Please ask every one you know to answer 
that, especially. A neat and useful little 
package is being sent to all who solve that 
puzzle. 



Some of my enemies are telling adver- 
tisers that I have no such circulation as I 
claim. Whenever you hear a man say this, 
offer to bet him $100 that I have an actual 
paid circulation of 40,000 copies a month. 
Then I will furnish the proof, and if I win 
his money, will give it to St. John's Guild, 
to be applied to the Sick Babies' Fresh Air 
Fund. If he wins my money, he can do 
what he likes with it. 



The owners of Madison Square Garden 
are talking of selling it. If sold it is likely 
that it would be torn down. That would be 
a public calamity. W T hat would sportsmen 
do without the big Garden? Where could 
we go with our sportsmen's show, our dog 
show, our horse show, our wild West show, 
our bicycle show? It is hoped no such 
sacrifice may be necessary. 

Why cannot the boxes in the Garden be 
sold, by the year, as in the Metropolitan 
Opera House? In this way a guarantee 
fund could be secured that would avert any 
possible loss to the stockholders. There 
must certainly be a large number of men in 
New York who would pay $100 to $200 a 
year for boxes in the Garden rather than 
see it destroyed. 



In planning your hunting trips, for next 
fall, don't take anymore cartridges with you 
than necessary to kill a reasonable quantity 
of the game you seek. Then you wont be 
tempted to shoot at everything you see, 
just to lighten your belt. At any rate don't 
kill more game than you need and can save. 



The index to volume 6 is now ready. If 
you wish to bind your Recreation, and 
have not received a copy of the index, send 
for it. 



My subscription receipts for May '95 
were $292, for May '96 $902 and for May '97 
$1,596— a gain of 500 per cent, over '95. 
Anything wrong with that? 



72 



BICYCLING. 



AN ENJOYABLE CENTURY RUN. 

C. PERCY HALYBURTON. 

I have heard it said, on numerous occa- 
sions, and by many well informed persons, 
that century runs, and such " abuses of the 
wheel," are violations of the rules of health 
and only help to bring the bicycle into ill- 
repute. 

I have seen many caricatures of the " cen- 
tury run fiend," picturing him as a sallow- 
faced, wild-eyed, hump-backed idiot — in 
short, a typical " wild man of Borneo on 
wheels." If you see any of these character- 
istics in the group of young men who made 
the century run I am about to describe, you 
certainly need the attention of an oculist. 

Six young men were seated in the parlor 
of the club house, of the Penn Wheelmen, 
Philadelphia, discussing plans for Decora- 
tion day, which was only 2 days removed. 
None of the several schemes proposed for 
the amusement of the party was accepted, 
by unanimous consent, and each had almost 
determined to seek his own pleasures for 
the holiday. Finally a happy inspiration 
seized me and I said: 

" I have it boys! Just the thing for the 
whole crowd! " 

" Let us have it, Purse! " 

" Give it an airing! " 

" Trot out the idea, old man! " 

" Purse has the floor! " were the replies. 

" Well, I'll tell you," I began 

"Oh, will you!" 

" How kind!" 

" My idea is a century run to New York, 
on Decoration day, and return the follow- 
ing day, Sunday, on the train." 

" That's the best yet," cried Jack Gruel, 
the club's second lieutenant. 

"That's what, Jack!" said Foley. 
" There is a pleasure trip for us all." 

The other 3 members of the coterie, 
Price, Bong and Daniels, quickly agreed to 
the plan, and after a little further discussion 
we dispersed. 

The night preceding Decoration day we 
all presented ourselves at the club house 
and proceeded to the third floor, where 4 
of us were soon asleep. Bong and Daniels 
did not sleep with us. They had decided to 
ride to New York during the night, the 
former being well acquainted with the 
route. 

At 3 o'clock the janitor awoke us, and 
after having lighted our lamps, we started 
on our journey. The sleepy coppers eyed 
us with wonder, as did also a few belated 
wayfarers. They were not used to seeing 
cyclists riding at such an unseemly hour. 

We rode through Frankford and Torres- 
dale, and at daybreak arrived in Bristol, 22 



miles from Philadelphia. From Bristol to 
Trent,on, N. J., a distance of 10 miles, is a 
stretch of good side-path; but in some 
places it is very narrow — only 5 or 6 inches 
wide. The road is miserable and we could 
not ride on it. We were subjected to a 
number of falls, owing to the narrow side- 
paths and slippery grass bordering the 
path, which was still wet with dew. How- 
ever we received only a few bruises. 

We arrived in Trenton at 6 o'clock and 
straightway proceeded to a restaurant for 
breakfast. " It was wonderful to see the 
amount of fodder those fellows put away," 
as Foley put it. 

Leaving our wheels at the hotel, we 
walked about New Jersey's capital awhile 
and at 8 o'clock resumed our journey. 

We passed through some very pretty 
towns — Pennington, Hopewell, Blauen- 
berg and Plainville. At Pennington we 
were serenaded by a colored brass band 
and enjoyed the sensation very much. 

Soon after passing Plainville we met the 
great century run of the Quaker City 
Wheelmen of Philadelphia. The riders had 
left Newark that morning and were on 
their way to Philadelphia. There were over 
600 wheelmen in line. These people were 
not out for pleasure as we were. They had 
a schedule, and rode accordingly, and the 
consequence was, many looked greatly 
fatigued. 

We arrived in Somerville, 63 miles from 
Philadelphia, at 11 o'clock, a uniform pace 
of 8 miles an hour, and no one was feeling 
at all tired. We remained in Somerville a 
half hour, watching a parade, and then 
moved on to Bound Brook, where we 
stayed another half hour,' viewing the town. 

At one o'clock we rode into Plainfield, 13 
miles from Somerville, and ate a hearty 
dinner. 

All wheeldom was out in force in Plain- 
field and we stood entranced as we watched 
the flying wheels, propelled by sturdy 
young men and pretty bloomer girls. 

We tarried in Plainfield until 3 o'clock 
and then started for Elizabeth, where we 
arrived in 45 minutes — a distance of 12 
miles. The road between the 2 towns is 
an excellent one, and you can scarcely resist 
the temptation to ride fast over it. We 
continued through Elizabeth and Newark 
without stopping, but halted at a hotel in 
East Newark for some refreshment. As we 
stepped out on the porch to rest and enjoy 
the cool breezes we saw 2 wheelmen ap- 
proaching, in whom we recognized Bong 
and Daniels. We hailed them, when they 
joined us and explained that a broken axle 
had delayed them and had prevented their 
arrival in New York before us. 

We all rode into Jersey City together and 



73 



74 



RECREA TION. 



crossed over to New York. Then we rode 
out Broadway, on the cable slot, to our 
hotel. 

The next day, Sunday, we visited the Bat- 
tery, rode through Central park, and over 
the great bridge to Brooklyn, where we 
dined. Then we mounted our wheels and 
rode to Coney Island over the famous cycle 
path. 

After taking a rapid survey of this resort 
we returned to Brooklyn, thence to New 
York, over the bridge, and continued to 
Jersey City by the ferry. Here we boarded 
the train for Philadelphia, where we ar- 
rived at 7 P. M. 

The trip was a very enjoyable one, to all 
of us, and not one of us was fatigued when 
we reached home. We had seen a great 
deal in the 2 days and shall make a similar 
run this year. 



THE WHEEL. 

The girls were dolls in Gran'ma's days, 
The spinning wheel was half their life. 

Man's equals now, in modern ways, 
Yet spinning wheels is far more rife. 

E. S. T. 



I intend to spend next winter revelling 
in the charms of Jamaica, that sunny island 
of a summer sea, and if any reader of Rec- 
reation would like information about the 
roads, or the people, of the geography of 
the isle, I shall be glad to give it. 

Our New England roads are again alive 
with happy wheelers — happy if they are 
owners of decent mounts, and if they have 
not been putting good money into bad 
wheels, to swell the wallets of repairers 
and of bargain counter men. 

On the whole, since the average would- 
be-cycler is determined to work against 
his own best interests, maybe it is well that 
the drygoods wheel is his first mount; for 
then he becomes a rider, and next time he 
buys a good wheel. Meantime he has been 
picking up experience and sprains, and 
helping Doctor Fixem to pay his rent. 

Any of Recreation's cycling readers, 
who would like to know all about " touring 
in England at small cost," from start to 
finish, can secure such by writing the vet- 
eran tourist, Arthur Munson, Stamford, 
Ct. 

Those who ignore brakes, and a good 
lamp, at night, will some time realize that 
they have gone unprotected once too often. 
While the doctor is pulling them through 
they will have time to reflect and to turn 
over that long neglected new leaf. 

Stamson. 



In April, '97, the Ticonderoga Cycle Club 
commenced the building of a path from 
Ticonderoga to Baldwin, a distance of 3^2 
miles. Permission was obtained from the 
town authorities to level off the side of the 
road, near the sidewalks, and to cover it 
with cinders. This space was then rolled 
with an iron roller. In places where drain- 
age was necessary, to carry off surface 
water, a ditch was dug alongside the path, 
emptying into the sewers. 

The path is 4 feet wide, and will permit 
an easy and safe passage of 2 wheelmen 
without dismounting. It is a pleasure to 
ride on it to the Baldwin dock, on a hot 
summer day, sit in the cool breeze of the 
beautiful Lake George, and view the grand 
scenery for which the locality is noted. 

The question as to how to raise the 
money for this path was a perplexing one; 
but a subscription paper was circulated 
among the boys, who were asked to give 
as much as they felt able to spare. Most 
of them gave $1 each. There are about 200 
riders here, but the number will be doubled 
this year. 

Recreation is the only sportsmen's 
magazine published. J. C. R. 



That athletic preacher of ours made a 
bad break in his sermon yesterday. 

What did he say? 

He was speaking of the earth and called 
it God's green football. 



Miss E. Marguerite Lindley recently 
gave a lecture for the benefit of the sick 
fund of the Brooklyn Hospital Training 
School on the " Care of the Human Ma- 
chine and the Good and Evil Effects of 
Bicycling." She included in her discourse 
these " don'ts " : 

" Don't feel yourself above advice from 
other people who know more than you do, 
when you are going to buy a wheel. 

" Don't swallow all advice undigested. 

" Don't buy your neighbor's cast off 
wheel. If it's not good enough for her it's 
not good enough for you. 

" Don't consider your ambition any 
measure of your staying power. The great- 
est danger of wheeling is of overdoing. 

" Don't try to reduce your weight by 
scorching. 

" Don't give ear to the cyclometer fiend. 
She is apt to see double when she reads the 
figures on the dial. 

"Don't talk of miles covered, but of 
hours spent in the open air." 



The National Board of Trade of Cycle 
Manufacturers has decided that no national 
or local cycle shows shall be held or sanc- 
tioned by it next winter. 



" Simpkins is a bicycle instructor, isn't 
he?" 

" No — no; bicycles know everything al- 
ready; he merely teaches people how to 
ride." 



BICYCfJNG. 



75 



The Olympia-Tacoma record was recent- 
ly broken by Frank Cotter, of Olympia, 
who lowered it 9 minutes; making the 35 
miles in 1 hour and 58 minutes. 

Improvements are being made on the 
cinder path from this city to Edison, 6 
miles distant. This path is the finest in this 
neck o' woods, and includes the largest bi- 
cycle bridge in the world. 

Nearly 2,500 bicycle licenses have been 
issued in this city, this year, and more are 
expected. This money goes to build bike 
paths and bridges, in the city limits. 

About 800 cyclists came over from Seat- 
tle, last Sunday, to take a spin on our roads. 

C. G. 



"Your husband seems jealous of your 
Scotch terrier? " 

" Yes; Charles has never won any prizes 
on his stories; but dear little Fido has 
taken 5 blue ribbons this year." 



August Summerman, 13 years old, of 
Union Hill, N. J., lost 2 fingers of his right 
hand in a curious manner. He had been 
cleaning his bicycle and stood it on a sup- 
port which left the wheels free. He re- 
volved the rear wheel rapidly, and, in an 
effort to stop it, his fingers slipped in be- 
tween the spokes and were thrown against 
the fork. 

The index finger was cut off almost as if 
by a knife, while the second finger was 
mangled so badly that the Doctor was 
obliged to amputate it. The bicycle was 
uninjured. 



The new ferry, at West 23d Street, is a 
luxury for wheelmen who wish to use the 
fine roads in Jersey. It affords the easiest 
and most convenient exit there is from 
this city, since 24th Street is asphalted to 
the ferry house door. The new ferry can 
now be reached from various parts of the 
city by 8th, Madison or Lexington Ave- 
nues, all of which are asphalted. The time, 
from 23d Street to Jersey City, is 15 
minutes and from there you can get a train 
every half hour to Elizabeth, where you 
connect with the various boulevards. 

I have never seen, elsewhere, any rail- 
way employes who were so polite and 
courteous to wheelmen as are the Penn- 
sylvania people, at this new ferry house. 



I received the Bristol steel fishing rod, 
for 10 subscriptions to Recreation. I had 
it out the other day, and it worked to per- 
fection. I think I am well repaid for my 
trouble in getting the subscriptions. Rec- 
reation is one of the finest books I have 
ever read. 

John T. McCall, Negaunee, Mich. 



PUZZLE PAGE. 

HIDDEN WORD PUZZLE. 

I am composed of 1 1 letters and come 
from " away down East." My first is found 
in Portland, my second in Albion, my third 
in Belfast, my fourth in Bangor, my fifth in 
Bingham, my sixth in Andover, my seventh 
in Berwick, my eighth in Ashland, my ninth 
in Danforth, my tenth in Eliot, and my 
eleventh in Exeter. 

Whoever will guess me, and send my full 
name to Recreation, stating on what page 
of this issue I am advertised, will receive, in 
return, a beatifully illustrated book. 



Ask all your friends to answer the puzzles 
in Recreation. The more the better, for 
all concerned. 



New Castle, Pa. 

Editor Recreation: You will please 
find enclosed my answers to the 4 puzzles in 
May Recreation. I don't think I have 
the first one right, but if not, I am willing 
to give it up; for I have read every line of 
every advertisement in this issue; and I 
want to say right here that the Vim tires 
are as hard to wear out as that puzzle is to 
get. I have a pair of last year's red road 
Vims on my wheel. I punctured both front 
and rear tires, last season; repaired them 
myself, with a Vim repair outfit, and have 
had no trouble with them since. 

I am going to canvass among my friends 
for subscribers to your valuable magazine. 
I will send you names and money as I get 
them; you may credit me with them, and 
I will let you know, later, what premium I 
want. I received a Davenport rifle from 
you, a year or so ago, as a premium, and it 
is a fine rifle for the money. I took Rec- 
reation a year, and a friend got me to 
subscribe for another- sportsmen's paper; 
but I don't like it and am going back to my 
old love. My friend is going to take up a 
new love — Recreation. 

Rob Ray. 



" Scrymser is an intellectual man, isn't 
he?" 

" Intellectual? I should say not. Why 
— he likes whist better than poker." 



Enclosed please find $1 for which please 
send Recreation to me one more year. I 
would have to have it, if it took my last 
dollar. 

Harvery J. Flint, Edgewood, R. I. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



Aristotle was perhaps the greatest nat- 
uralist of early times, and but slight ad- 
vancement was made, in zoological science, 
from his day to that of Linnaeus, who made 
the first attempt at grouping animals ac- 
cording to structural characteristics. Cuvier 
followed with a more thorough and sys- 
tematic classification, making use of dis- 
section to determine the relations existing 
between them. Then came de Blainville, 
who first took up the elements of form 
among animals. 

Scores of naturalists and scientists have 
since given their life work to the building 
up of modern zoology, and no branch of 
science has been more rapidly and steadily 
advanced. 

But the thorough and systematic study 
of comparative anatomy, from the artists' 
point of view, is still more recent. Ten 
years ago there was no text book on this 
subject; and this fact, in conjunction with 
his natural bent, induced Ernest Seton 
Thompson, the animal painter, to devote 
several years of ardent toil to the produc- 
tion of " Art Anatomy of Animals," a most 
delightful, thorough and original book. 
It is so artistically designed, so compre- 
hensive, so redolent of deep study and care- 
ful research, so full of nature and of fact, 
as to be at once instructive and fascinating 
to students of science and of art. It is really 
fortunate that no earlier writer or student 
had put forth such a work, for necessity 
was, in this as in many other instances, the 
mother of production, and if Mr. Thomp- 
son had found a book on animal anatomy 
when first he felt its need, he would not 
have made this. Hence we might never 
have had so good an one; for few men have 
been so well equipped as he for such a 
task. His artistic gifts, and his years of life 
among and with the wild animals of the 
Northwest, as well as his love for and close 
association with dogs, horses and cattle, 
have fitted him, as no other man was ever 
fitted, for the work. Another reviewer has 
said: 

" What can an artist learn of the outward 
form of animals, if he live only in the dis- 
secting room? 

He may, indeed, obtain an accurate mus- 
cular outline; but it will be an outline of a 
cold, rigid corpse, devoid of the soft and 
rounded form, the delicate tinting, and the 
breathing grace which invests the living 
animal. A feeling eye ,viil always discover 
whether an artist has painted even his de- 
tails of attire from a lay figure, or whether 
he has depicted the raiment as it rested on 
and drooped from the breathing form of a 
living model. 

The zoologist will never comprehend 
the nature of any creature by the most 



careful investigation of its interior struct- 
ure, or the closest inspection of its stuffed 
skin, for the material structure tells little 
of the vital nature, and the stuffed skin is 
but the lay figure stiffly fitted with its own 
cast coat." 

In the preparation of " Art Anatomy," 
not only the body on the dissecting table 
but the living, moving, breathing form was 
always kept in sight. 

No anatomical description of the animal 
is given, other than those that influence the 
outward form. Over ioo drawings by the 
author, contribute to the value of this most 
admirable work. 

The illustrations of the anatomy of the 
hair deserve special mention, while the 
nerves, glands, muscles and bones are 
clearly defined in a manner to make plain 
their influence on the outward form, as also 
the expressions, emotions, and movements. 

The figures selected are pleasingly fa- 
miliar. The general character and meas- 
urements of many of the animals are fully 
and elaborately given, and are placed in so 
simple a form as to be easily comprehended 
by those whose knowledge of animals is 
limited. At the same time, the most minute 
details, in these as well as in the illustra- 
tions, are so carefully and perfectly traced 
as to challenge the criticism of the greatest 
painter, sculptor, naturalist, or taxidermist. 

" Art Anatomy of Animals," by Ernest 
Seton Thompson. Macmillan & Co., New 
York and London: Price $10.00. 



G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York and 
London, announce the publication of " The 
Encyclopaedia of Sport." This work has 
been planned to cover, as nearly as practic- 
able, the whole range of sports in which 
English and American sportsmen and read- 
ers are alike interested. The book is edited 
by Mr. F. G. Aflalo, who has secured con- 
tributions from the leading authorities, on 
both sides of the Atlantic, while other con- 
tributions are from men who have not be- 
fore been induced to come into print with, 
their personal experiences or suggestions. 
The minor and unsigned articles are also 
the work of experienced sportsmen, and in 
order to insure all possible accuracy of de- 
tail, they have been submitted to the careful 
revision and scrutiny of experts. The scope 
of the subject matter includes articles on 
topics which, while not in themselves to 
be classed directly under " Sport," may 
easily become important in connection with 
sport, such as " First Aid to the Injured," 
"Veterinary Work," " Taxidermy," etc. It 
has been the aim of the editor to secure 
contributions which, while authoritative in 
all their technical details, are thoroughly 
readable as descriptive narratives. 



76 



BOOK NOTICES. 



77 



The work undertakes to be a dictionary 
as well as a cyclopaedia, and gives defini- 
tions of all common and technical terms 
used in speaking of any kind of sport. All 
the more important articles, and many of 
the shorter ones, are carefully and accurate- 
ly illustrated. 

As samples of the more important articles 
in Part I. of the Encyclopaedia, I may cite 
the following: 

Amateur, 3 columns, illustrated. 

America Cup, 

Ammunition, 7 columns, by H. F. Phil- 
lips, illustrated. 

Angling, 52^ columns, by H. S. Thomas, 
illustrated. 

Antelopes, 13 columns, by H. A. Bryden, 
illustrated. 

Archery, 16 columns, by H. Walrond, il- 
lustrated. 

Athletic Sports, 13 columns, by C. B. Fry, 
illustrated. 

" The Encyclopaedia of Sport " will be 
issued in 20 large quarto parts, at $1.00 a 
copy. Each part will contain 56 pages, 
double column, illustrated text, printed on 
heavy calendered paper, together with 2 
full-page illustrations in photogravure. A 
glossary of technical terms will be included 
in the last part. 

Judging from the first part, which I have 
examined, this work will be a most valuable 
one and will become a necessity to every 
sportsman who wishes to be well informed. 



" Travels in West Africa," by Mary H. 
Kingsley, is a remarkable book. It is rare 
that a woman's curiosity, great as that is 
supposed to be, leads her to explore wild 
countries; nor has she usually the physical 
endowment necessary to such work. Miss 
Kingsley was not led, however, by mere 
curiosity to explore the West coast of Af- 
rica. She sought that field as a new one 
to science and her prime object was to 
study the fauna of the region. Her re- 
searches were rich in results, and she has 
made many contributions to science. 

In a valuable appendix, Dr. A. Guenther 
describes 16 new species of fauna, discov- 
ered by Miss Kingsley, and 8 new species 
of insects. 

She, however, says little about her sci- 
entific work; and the book contains so 
vast a fund of general information, regard- 
ing Western Africa, that you wonder when 
Miss Kingsley found time for special 
scientific study. Her narrative is de- 
lightful. Difficulties and dangers seem 
only to have amused and inspired her. 
She mentions them gayly, as having lent 
zest to the undertaking, and seems to have 
flitted like a will-o'-the-wisp over the 
swamps and through the great forests. 

Particularly interesting and . delightful 
chapters are those on Bush Trade and Fan 
Customs, Congo Frangais, Fetish, the As- 



cent of the Great Peak of Cameroons, and 
Trade and Labor in West Africa. The 
book contains many valuable illustration 9 
and a good index. It is only a lazy lay- 
man who will wish there was also a map. 
Published by Macmillan & Co.; price, $4. 



" Easter Bells," a charming collection of 
Margaret E. Sangster's poems, published 
by Harper and Brothers at $1.25, is espe- 
cially appropriate to the season of the year 
which is indicated by its title, but it is also 
a good all-the-year-round book. Its table 
of contents is grouped under 4 general head- 
ings, i.e., " Songs of the Easter-Tide," 
" Home and Hearth," " Mile-Stones " and 
" Closet and Altar." No one, be he saint 
or sinner, can open its pages at random and 
read without receiving benefit. 



In ordering or inquiring about books or 
other goods, mentioned or advertised in 
Recreation always mention this magazine. 
This attention on your part serves to con- 
vince publishers, and other advertisers, of 
the value of Recreation as an advertising 
medium. 



Your magazine is greatly admired by the 
sportsmen in this neck-of-woods. All of 
our true sportsmen, who delight in the use 
of the rod and gun, look eagerly for its 
coming and devour its contents eagerly. 
G. N. Mills, Otsego, Mich. 



I am glad to see the showing of your 
monthly cash balance and hope, most 
heartily, the coming year may show still 
larger. The dollars are the sinews of war, 
in newspaperdom. 

' E. H. Cooney, Great Falls, Mont. 



Recreation, certainly, is one of the high 
grade magazines, if the price is low. 

R. G. Wallace, Chula Vista, Cal. 




PLUGINE 
ARRESTS 
PUNCTURES 

We positively guaran- 
tee your tires if they 
are treated with Plug- 
ine, "the wheelman's 
friend." Two tubes 
enough for two tires, 
sent prepaid for $1.00. 
Circular free. 

The National 

Specialty Co., 

91 Euclid av., 
Cleveland, 0. 



78 RECREA TION. 



Does Not Curl. 

Properly handled, Eastman's Film does not 
Curl. And to properly handle Eastman's Film 
is so easy that the " Curl " can be said to exist 
only in the imaginations of a few beginners who 
have listened to the vagaries of the manufacturers 
of cheap plate cameras. A little preliminary 
soaking in cold water with the face of the 
film down will make it lie as fiat as a glass plate. 
Development follows just the same as for plates, 
but with the film fiace down instead of face up. 
Handle the films one at a time at first, just as 
you would be obliged to do with plates, and 
you will find them fully as easy to manipulate — 

and they won't break. After a little experience 
you can handle several films in the developer at 
one time — an impossibility with plates. Photog- 
raphy is Easy with a Film cartridge camera. 

Cartridge Cameras, $5.00 to $25.00. 



$2,853.00 in Prizes for 
Kodak Pictures. 

$1,475.00 in Gold. 

Send for "Prize Contest" 
Circular. 



Booklet free at agencies or by mail. 



EASTMAN 



KODAK 
COMPANY, 
Rochester, N. Y. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY 



TRIALS OF AN AMATEUR. 

J. N. BEECHER. 

Come into the garden Maud, 

Bring the kodak — largest size. 
And we'll take some stunning pictures 
Maud, 

For Recreation's prize. 

Sixty days ago I didn't know a hand 
camera from a hay baler; but in reading 
Recreation I ran against your photo prize 
contest. Then the camera craze struck 
me square between the eyes and mush- 
roomed. I resolved then and there that I 
would capture your first prize if I had to 
load a cartridge kodak plum to the muzzle 
to do it. How well I have succeeded the 
picture I send you, with this, will decide. 
But oh! the trials of an amateur! 

First buying a good 4x5 camera I went 
to work and ran the whole shooting match 
myself, from posing to pasting, and if there 
are any chemicals listed that I haven't ex- 
perimented with, or any photo supply 
house, East of the Rocky mountains, that 
hasn't heard from me, it's simply an over- 
sight on my part — that's all. 

And the subjects! I knew wild animals 
would make striking pictures; and being 
something of a trapper I decided to com- 
mence on the gentle coyote; for I knew by 
experience just how pleasant a coyote can 
look when he has a paw in a No. 2 New- 
house trap. He can then open his jaws 
wide enough to swallow his whole body. 

When I set my traps every wolf in the 
hills seemed to know I wanted a prize pict- 
ure, and it was just 3 weeks later that my 
" assistant trapper " rushed in on me, at 
3 p.m., shouting: 

" Hurry up. Big coyote in the trap! " 

I snatched my camera, saddled the pinto, 
" tied the dog loose," and we hit the trail. 
Gee! but it would have done you good to 
have seen that pony and dog. They knew 
something was up for they had been there 
before; and as, we dashed through town, 
out into the mountains, everybody knew 
" Beecher had gone crazy again." 

We had to make time or the sun would 
be too low for a snap shot and it wasn't 
long till we got there. I jumped to the 
ground, threw the check strap to " Tiger's" 
collar — words won't hold that old dog 
when he smells a coyote — and we slid cau- 
tiously up the hill; Tiger pulling on the 
lead till he caught sight of the wolf. Then 
he gave a lunge that lifted me nearly off my 
feet, and a howl that struck terror to the 
heart of Mr. Coyote. The latter didn't 
stand on the order of going, but went. 

One bound into the air — trap and all — 
when snap! went the chain and off went 



the cussed old coyote with one of my best 
steel traps on his foot. I turned old Tiger 
loose and he didn't need any urging. He 
bounded to one side of the trail while I 
took the other, and the pace, for a few rno- 
ments, was rather too lively for even a 
snap shot — shortest time — big stop. 

The coyote didn't go far till the trap 
caught in a bush. I jumped in front of him 
and gave him one between the eyes, from 
my revolver, just as a starter. Then Tige 
came in on the other side and had him by 
the neck so quick he barely escaped my 
shot. We soon got even with the brute for 
breaking away and spoiling our photo con- 
test. 

My partner kicked just because, as he 
said, " I was shooting pretty close toward 
him." I told him if he thought I was go- 
ing to take any chances on losing a good 
coyote skin, and one of my best steel traps, 
just because he happened to be standing 
around in the way, he must take me for a 
tenderfoot; that as long as I hit the coyote 
I was shooting at, he needn't kick. Then 
he got mad and said I " could run the 
dogoned amateur kodunk biz myself, after 
this." Did I get a good picture? Well, no; 
for when we called the outfit to order and 
sorted out the dog, and horse, and dead 
coyote, from the camera, it was too dark for 
snap shots. And that's why I didn't get first 
prize in Recreation's amateur contest. 
Still, as I write this my tired feet rest on a 
large and handsome coyote rug, and ol\ 
Tige had a pile of fun! 



To C. P'. S., Cleveland, Ohio, who asks 
how to get the carbon finish on photos, I 
beg to say you will be obliged to get Velox 
or Delta matt printing paper. No glace pa- 
per will produce a carbon finish. The matt 
is always in dull finish. Velox paper is 
developed after printing. 

On taking it from your printing frame, 
it will bear no trace or outline of plate or 
negative. You then place it in your de- 
veloping tray and pour (quickly) your ton- 
ing developer on it, taking care that it 
covers it at one sweep. Then proceed as 
in developing other plates, only that you 
can do this by gas or daylight. When it 
has reached the desired tone or shade do 
not rinse in water but toss it in your hypo 
fixing bath. All directions come with the 
paper. You can see at once that Velox 
must be the coming carbon paper. It can 
be toned any shade, in olive or black. It 
is very sensitive and prints in 5 seconds, 
when exposed to gaslight, and in 7 seconds 
by daylight. You must be governed by 
the depth of your negative, as to whether 
it be thick or thin. 

Mrs. C. W. K., New Haven, Conn. 



79 



8o 



RECRJEA TlOJSt. 



COMBINED TONING AND FIXING 
BATH. 

Why is it used? 

Simply because it is less trouble and is 
thought to be cheaper. The fact is it is just 
the reverse, and prints toned therein are not 
always permanent. When toning a print 
you want the best possible results, and 
should therefore make it absolutely perma- 
nent and with clear whites. The combined 
bath gives neither. The combination of 
hypo, borax, alum, lead, etc., is not so 
staple as one might suppose. A chemical 
action takes place and decomposes some 
of the chemicals, at the same time liberat- 
ing sulphur fumes. 

After several years of experimenting I 
have concluded that a single bath is best. 
Some amateurs tone as many as 50 4 x 5 
prints in 8 oz. of combined bath. Do they 
suppose, for one minute, that there is 
enough hypo to fix the prints, or enough 
gold to tone them, in so small a quantity? 
Well, I don't, and those of my prints, toned 
in combined solution, which are in the best 
condition, are those on which I used 16 oz. 
of new to 8 oz. old solution. I toned at 
about 50 degrees, using cracked ice, cleared 
in salt water (1 oz. salt to 32 oz. water) 
washed and fixed in an extra fixing bath. 
Then I washed, thoroughly, in water and 
allowed 8 oz. bath to each 15 4 x 5 prints. 

A combined bath may produce a good 
print occasionally, but cannot be relied 
upon. Prints thus treated turn yellow in 
a short time and finally fade out altogether. 
This may be due to insufficient washing, 
after toning; to an exhausted bath; or, 
most likely, a sulphur tone. Hundreds of 
my first pictures are faded, and I was com- 
pelled to make them over, using the single 
bath, which, while being a trifle more te- 
dious, amply repays one for the extra labor, 
from the fact that it insures permanency if 
properly used. 1 

I do not claim that none of the combined 
baths give permanent results but have never 
found one that is absolutely reliable. 

Is the print toned first and then fixed? 
Or, is it fixed and then toned? This ques- 
tion always puzzled me. How can clear 
whites be obtained if the free silver (not the 
Bryan kind) is not first washed out? These 
are puzzles to me and should any reader 
be able to explain them I would be pleased 
to hear from him, through Recreation. 

G. A. C. 



HOW TO WORK PLATINUM 
PAPER. 

In the first washing take half a gallon 
of water and add 2 ounces of saturated sal 
soda. Put in prints and flatten down. 
After they are drained and flattened, pour 
on plenty of clean water. Wash in 5 



changes. By handling them over, you will 
never be bothered with red spots. Tone 
in 60 ounces of water. Take one teaspoon- 
ful of table salt; gold one grain; borax 
enough to turn red litmus paper blue in 3 
or 4 minutes; adding gold enough to keep 
bath speed 6 to 8 minutes. Tone in this 
bath to point you desire when finished; 
bearing in mind that they will not be any 
warmer when dry. Place prints in salt 
water — one tablespoonful to half gallon of 
water. When ready wash them out 3 times 
to clear them of the salt. 

This is the way I work all Aristo and 
other papers. The acid in papers once re- 
moved they tone easier, with less gold, and 
with clear whites. W. 



Mr. Wm. Schutte, who made the excel- 
lent radiographs of fishes shown elsewhere 
in this issue, says he will be glad to give 
any information desired, on the subject of 
X ray photography. Address him in care 
of Recreation. 



A friend of mine asked me if I knew of 
a remedy for negatives that are too thin. 
They print the sky and other objects of the 
same shade. I think his negatives have 
been left too long in the hypo. 

J. R., Yazoo City, Miss. 

Most likely these negatives are over- 
timed and underdeveloped. It would be 
well to send with all such questions a silver 
print, unmounted. 

An underexposed plate yields a negative 
full of contrast, with clear glass in the 
shadows. An overexposed plate yields a 
flat- negative, with no contrast (shadows 
veiled or entirely blocked), full of detail 
but with no snap. 



TO PHOTOGRAPH BABY. 

Get 6 large wire nails, 6 ounces chloro- 
form, 1 handkerchief. Saturate the hand- 
kerchief with the chloroform and press 
over the nose and mouth of the baby till 
perfectly quiet. Then drive nails through 
each ear, hands and feet, into a board large 
enough for background. Use hammer on 
parents if necessary. — Photographic Life. 



" That photographer is crazy." 
" What's the matter? " 
" He wanted me to pay cash down for 
long distance photographs." 



" Rose says it is a perfect bore to be 
married to a photographer." " Why ? " " If 
she doesn't smile all the time he jumps up 
and down in front of her and rings a little 
bell." — Chicago Record. 



RECREATION. g T 




( REMOS 

PRODUCE 

PEPvFECT 

PICTURES 




Premo 

Cameras 

Have achieved an enviable reputation the world 
over. Their PERFECT construction and ease of 
manipulation, combined with grace, beauty, and. 
superb finish, have placed them in the front rank, 
and they are to-day the Favorite Camera with the 
foremost Amateur and Professional Photographers. 



20 



MADE IN y( I DIFFERENT STYLES 

AND SIZES 



Special Designs for the Sportsman and Tourist 



CATALOGUE MAILED FREE 



Rochester Optical Co*, Rochester, N* Y* 



PUBLISHER'S DEPARTMENT. 



A "BULLET" FOR BIG GAME. 

Editor Recreation: Two weeks ago we 
went on a hunt for big game, in the Phila- 
delphia " Zoo." My husband took paper 
and pencil and I cast about for a camera. 
Interviews with several friends, resulted in a 
strong recommendation to try the Eastman 
No. 4 Bullet. I did not believe a first class 
camera could be bought for $15. However, 
I was persuaded into getting a Bullet for 
hand work, but at the same time, to provide 
against failures, I ordered a large, expen- 
sive tripod camera for " serious work." 
To my disgust the order for the large 
camera was not filled in time for the trip. 
The Bullet, however, came all right, and I 
was forced to set out with it alone, feeling 
that mine was a fool's errand. I did not 
know my machine, was quite sure it was 
not worth knowing, and, to quote the sales- 
man, I had never used " fill-ums." 

That New Yorkers have to go to the 
Philadelphia Zoo to study animals, is flat- 
tering, no doubt, to that city; but the fact 
casts a decided reflection on New York. 
It is to be hoped the New York Zoological 
Society, under the direction of Mr. W. T. 
Hornaday, will soon make such a reflec- 
tion impossible. It will be a great day for 
New York, and its artists, when the Bronx 
Park Zoo is thrown open to the public. 
In the meantime, serious students receive 
courteous treatment from Mr. A. E. 
Brown, the Superintendent of the Phila- 
delphia Zoo. 

My husband, whose experience has em- 
braced many Zoos, in Europe and in this 
country, says he " has never found another 
whose director is so thoroughly in sym- 
pathy with any student of art, or zoology, 
who shows himself disposed to make a 
proper use of the opportunities afforded by 
the place." 

But to return to the camera. We worked 
a week, making sketches of the animals, 
and taking their portraits. Every keeper 
in the place assisted, cheerfully, as far as 
lay in his power. To photograph a correct 
impression of a caged animal, presents 
more difficulties than one would at first 
suppose. The lighting, the cage bars, or 
wire, the animal and the camera are well 
nigh irreconcilable. Therefore, when a 
good picture of a caged animal is obtained, 
the photographer has reason to congratu- 
late himself and his machine. 

I made 72 exposures on mammals, with 
my Bullet. A few of these were time, but 
chiefly slow snaps. Out of the number, 
there were but 8 failures, for all of which 
I was responsible. I got 14 inferior and 50 
good pictures. Some of the latter are per- 
fect gems, as you may judge from the 



samples herewith; which I should like to 
enter in Recreation's second annual 
photo contest. 

I have gone over to the enemy. If any 
one wants to buy a good, cheap camera, 
let him get a No. 4 Bullet, which is war- 
ranted for unlimited shots. G. G. S. T. 



A SURGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Dermatologist John H. Woodbury, who 
has large establishments in New York, 
Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia, may be 
justly called the surgical thaumaturgist of 
modern times. He is a nose maker, an ear 
refiner and a wrinkle destroyer. Beside 
this he eliminates freckles, makes cross 
eyes straight, puts hare lips into normal 
shape, and generally beautifies the human 
face and form, undoing the mistakes of nat- 
ure and the results of accident, and turning 
monsters into fairies, and freaks into pre- 
sentable people. 

The story of all this is attractively told 
by " The New York Journal," which nar- 
rates how an Omaha lady recently under- 
went treatment for a corrugated nose, the 
wrinkles being in the bone, and being 
anything but fascinating. The lady's nose 
was speedily made like other people's noses 
and she went home a happy woman. 

The Woodbury Dermatological Insti- 
tute, No. 127 W. 42d Street, New York, 
has thousands of testimonials from grate- 
ful patients, voluntarily given. Persons 
suffering from facial blemishes may ad- 
dress Dr. Woodbury with perfect con- 
fidence, as consultation is free, in person 
or by letter. Thousands of people have 
been successfully treated without leaving 
their homes. On application a question 
blank is mailed to any address. When this 
is carefully filled out it enables the physi- 
cian at the Institute to judge correctly the 
disease and condition of the patient. Those 
who are disposed to employ the skill at 
their command may rest assured the Insti- 
tute will not hazard its reputation by giving 
unwarranted encouragement, or a diag- 
nosis that is not well based and perfectly 
candid. 



Among the many good '97 bicycles is one 
that has many practical and convincing 
inprovements. I refer to the " Fenton." 
It is a work of artistic skill; the result of 
thorough tests and careful experiments by 
wheel makers, of many years' experience. 
The method of adjusting the bearings is 
superior to any yet contrived, and the re- 
sult is strength and simplicity combined. 
The material is of the finest and the trans- 



82 



PUBLISHERS DEPARTMENT. 



83 



lucent enamel finish is extremely handsome. 
The Fenton is as near perfection as can be 
produced. It will interest any rider to have 
the special features explained by Mr. Gif- 
ford, at 126 Chambers St. 

G. P. Granberry. 



In the lake regions of Wisconsin, North- 
ern Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa, and South 
Dakota, along the lines of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway, are hun- 
dreds of charming localities pre-eminently 
fitted for summer homes, nearly all of 
which are located on or near lakes which 
have not been fished out. These resorts 
range in variety from the " full dress for 
dinner " to the flannel shirt costume for 
every meal. If you are planning a vacation 
trip for the coming summer, send a two- 
cent stamp for a copy of " Vacation Days," 
giving description of the country traversed 
by the lines of the Chicago, Milwaukee, 
and St. Paul Railway, and a list of summer 
hotels and boarding houses, with rates for 
board, to George H. Heafford, 

General Passenger Agent, Chicago, 111. 



Everyone dreads the breaking in of a 
new pair of shoes; but after you have worn 
a pair of the " B.B. " shoes you will get 
over all that feeling. They are dead easy, 
from the start. They are made of Vici kid 
and are as soft and as comfortable as a last 
year's glove. The soles of the bike shoe 
are corrugated, inside as well as out, so that 
the air can circulate under your foot as you 
ride or walk. Therefore your feet keep 
cool. There is none of that burning sen- 
sation, on the bottoms of your feet, when 
wearing these shoes. Order a pair from 
the " B. B. Shoe Co.," 121 Duane St., New 
York, and see if you don't find them a 
genuine luxury. Mention Recreation. 



ELECTRICITY IN BELTS. 

An engineer in a large factory called the 
attention of a visiting electrician to the 
electricity in a big driving belt, and was 
surprised when the expert informed him 
the electricity was caused by the belt slip- 
ping. The expert added that it was simply 
a wasting of power and could be prevented 
by applying Dixon's Traction Belt Dress- 
ing, made by the Joseph Dixon Crucible 
Co., Jersey City, N. J. This dressing was 
applied and the electricity disappeared at 
once. Electricity in belts is not only a 
waste of power, but is also an element of 
danger from fire. 



The fame of the W. H. Mullins metal 
boats seems to have gone to the ends of the 
earth, if one may judge by the orders he is 
receiving for these excellent craft. Mr. 
Mullins writes me he has lately received an 



order for a galvanized steel Get-There Duck 
Boat, from Le Prince A. W. Bariatinsky, Var, 
France, to be shipped to him at Wiborg, Fin- 
land, Russia. Also an order for one Manga- 
nese Bronze Pleasure boat for one of the 
South American Governments, and for Man- 
ganese Bronze Dingey to be shipped to Mex- 
ico City, Mexico. 



I submit the following to show the popu- 
larity of your magazine. Albert Mulhol- 
land, little 4 year old son of S. D. Mulhol- 
land, on being told that he must remain 
in-doors this p.m., on account of the stormy 
weather, said: 

" All right! Guess I'll read my Recrea- 
tion." 

Though he cannot read he is greatly 
amused by looking at the pictures in Rec- 
reation and pretending to read the stories. 
N. B., Port Henry, N. Y. 

I have been reading Recreation for 
about 2 years, procuring it through the 
News Co. I have read copies of nearly all 
the sportsmen's journals, and find nothing 
that goes to the spot or fills the place of 
Recreation, with the " native " hunter 
and sportsman. It is just what he wants, 
both in quality and price, and is edited by 
a man who has been there. 

E. L. R., Westville, Ind. 



I received the Marlin 44-40 rifle and 38 
revolver which you sent me as premiums 
for clubs for Recreation. Please accept 
my sincere thanks. They are beautiful 
arms. The revolver shoots better than an- 
other I have of a well known make. The 
rifle can't be beaten. 

A. N., Worcester, Mass. 



The set of " In Darkest Africa " I or- 
dered of you came this a.m. all satisfactory. 
A gentleman from Miamisburg called at 
my office, saw the books, took your address 
and said he would order 2 sets at once, one 
for himself and the other for a friend. 

W. S. K., Dayton, O. 



Shut Up! 



19 




says "the Corker" to the 
puncture, and your tire is 
sound again. Always carry 

"THE CORKER" gr«* 

a quick mender for cycle tires. 
Twenty-five cents buys 
enough for 25 punctures. 
"CLINCHIT" Rubber Cement, 
"the stuff that sticks." Ounce 
tube, postpaid, 15c. 

Circulars free. 
The National Specialty Co., 
91 Euclid av., Cleveland, 0. 



8 4 



RECREA TION. 



A REVERIE. 



BY W. P. CHADWICK. 



When the days grow melancholy and the 
leaves begin to fall 

From the hickory and the maple, spread- 
ing o'er the earth a pall; 

When the beech nut and the acorn and the 
hazel nut abound 

And the busy, frisking squirrels hide their 
stores in tree or ground; 

Then there comes that feeling o'er us that 
cannot be told in words 

And we long to roam the forest and the 
prairie, free as birds. 

This unrest grows stronger, daily, with the 
rising of the sun, 

And impels us to go hunting with the rifle 
or the gun. 

If we are too busy, ever, on the farm or in 
the store 

To enjoy a day off now and then, much less 
a week or more, 

Still our hope beams bright before us, in 
our darkest hour of need, 

For if we can't go hunting we can Rec- 
reation read. 



Bearded Lady — " Wot ails ther ossified 
man?" 

Snake Lady — " He's a-kickin' coz ther 
drinkin'-worter iz so full o' lime." 



Quad 



No Separate 
Parts / / •• 

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photograph and booklet 




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sures ■without re- 
loading. Loaded 
in daylight. 

Simple and ef- 
ficient. 



Price, $8.00 
591 Broadway • 



Send for illustrated 
booklet. 



Anthony $ Co. 

• « « Hew VorR 



If you are in need of 

X Camera that 
will produce a « 
Perfect Picture, 

obtain 

The HAWK-EYE, Jr. 

which will be found . . ^ & & & 

a faithful friend at all times. 

The simplicity of its working parts enable the novice to obtain results that will astonish 
old photographers. Size, 4§ x 4 f x 6| in. Photo, 3* x 3* in. Weight, 20 oz. 

LOADS IN DAYLIGHT, OSES EITHER ROLL FILM OR GLASS PLATES. 




Send for Catalogue, giving description of all kinds of 
Cameras and Supplies. *" 



PRICE, $8.00 

THE BLAIR CAMERA CO., 471 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 



RECREATION. xvn 



ll^Baby Wizard 




Camer 



ex 



Js fie 

Ideal Camera. 

Only 2% x s^e x 6}i inches 

for TOURISTS, WHEELMEN 

OR SPORTSMEN GENERALLY 



Fitted with our Extra Rapid 
Rectilinear I^ens (unequaled in 
this country), and the Bausch 
and Isomb Optical Company's 
Iris Diaphragm Shutter 

Complete with Carrying Case 



$25.00 





Same without rack and pinion, for focussing, and swing back 



$20.00 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



Manhattan Optical Co*, Cresskifl, N* J. 



xvin RECREA TION. 




Every • | 

Sportsman 1 

Should g 

Have a I 

WATER-PROOF I 

I TENT I 

© " • ;■ '8 

| A camper knows the advantages of a tent that is an absolute protection against rain % 

| and dampness. We secure this advantage by OUR- water-proof PROCESS and 1 

£) avoid the extra bulk and weight of a fly. a 

| We make tents of all sizes, shapes and materials, suited to the needs of hunters | 

© campers, travellers, canoeists ; also 2 

| Water-Proof Sleeping Bags f 

© CANVAS BUCKETS, AMMUNITION, PROVISION, S 

| CLOTHING AND SADDLE BAGS, POUCHES, | 

| PACKS, BICYCLE COVERS, FLOOR CLOTHS, a 

| and many other Canvas Specialties a 

© a 

© a 

I Olir Sleeping Bag is unic J ue > excellent in pattern and finish, and has been § 

£ highly approved. a 



© 



SEND FOR CIRCULAR R, SAMPLES OF MATERIALS AND PRICE-LIST TO 

DERBY,ABERCROMBIE&CO. 

36 South Street, New York 



a 
a 
a 



RECREA TION. 



XIX 



r^¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥^ 



> 
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The Only Practical 

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IS THE 



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Kenwood 




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conditions — as, for instance, the outside water- 
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Price 

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Every Camper, Hunter, Angler, Prospector or Military Man should send for 
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The Kenwood Mills, Albany, n. y. 






XX 



RECREA TION. 




COPYRIGHT 188* 



AND CAMP 

OUTFITS 

We manufacture the largest and most 
complete line of tents in the country, 
and our goods are celebrated for their 
wearing and waterproof qualities* 

Send 4 cents in stamps for our new 
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all styles of Tents and Camp furniture* 

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202 to 210 S. Water Street* CHICAGO 

Established 1840. 



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,t»e stella 




Our new Music Box, playing any number of tunes on 
tune sheets, without pins or projections of any kind; 
surpasses all others in quality of tone and in dura- 
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in tone with the piano. Call and see it, or send for 
catalogue and list of tunes to 

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RECREATION. 



xxi 




Do you Know about j 

The New Camera?! 



The first one with which Amateurs can do Professional work. 
Results equal the work of $25 cameras. No failures. No mistakes, 
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a standard size plate 4x5 inches and cuts a sharp, clear picture 
to the extreme edge. Is fitted with an expensive, extra rapid 
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THE Adlake Shutter has no 
projecting levers, nothing 
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lost, and the diaphragm has 
three stops. Camera has find- 
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SAY, CULLY, DIS IS A GOOD HEALTHY PLANT, AIN'T IT?" 



xxii RECREA TION". 



Camping 



md 



Camp Outfits 

A MANUAL OP INSTRUCTION FOR YOUNG 
AND OLD SPORTSMEN. 

- 

Edited by G. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 

Author of "CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," •• HUNTING IN THE 
OREAT WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE," "THE BIG GAME OF 
NORTH AHERICA," " THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG," 
"AIIERICAN GAME FISHES," ETC. 



12mo. 200 Pages. 30 Illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 



CHIS book contains practical points on how to dress for Hunting, Fishing, or other Camping 
Trips; what to carry in the way of extra Clothing, Bedding, Provisions, Cooking Utensils, and 
all classes of Camp Equipage; how to select Camp Sites; how to make Camp Fires; how to 
build Temporary Shelters; what to do in case of Getting Lost, etc. It contains check lists of articles 
constituting Complete Camping Outfits; a list of the names and addresses of Guides, in various 
hunting and fishing countries, and much other information of value to Campers, and which has never 
before been given to the public. 

The instructions given are based on an experience of twenty-five years in Camping, and in the 
study of Camp Lore, Woodcraft, etc., and it is believed that the work will prove of great value to 
thousands of men and boys, who have not had such favorable opportunities for study. 
The book also contains a Chapter by 

DR. CHARLES GILBERT DAVIS, on CAMP HYGIENE, MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

ONE BY 

COL. J. FRY LAWRENCE, on CAMP COOKERY, 

AND ONB BY 

FRANK F. FRISBIE on THE DIAMOND HITCH, or HOW TO LOAD A PACK HORSE 



This book should be in the library of every Sportsman, and will- be sent, post-paid, on receipt 
of price, by the Author, 

Q. O. Shields, 19 W. 24th St., New York. 
Given as a Premium for Four Subscriptions to Recreation 



RECREA TION. 



xxni 




wr- 




This is the old Aztec idea of the game 
hog. He eats all he can hold of the fruit. 
Then he fills his apron full to overflowing. 
Then he cuts off the limb on which he sits; 
meantime heralding his exploits to the 
world by a great shouting and ringing of 
bells. He would have blown his horn, also, 
but in those days game hogs had no horns 
—nor even bristles. Finally this aztec 
game hog is undone by his own folly. 

How like the modern game hog! 



20 BOOKS - - 

ON 20 DIFFERENT SUBJECTS, 
BUT ALL RELATING TO SOME 
DELIGHTFUL PHASE OF 
AMERICAN TRAVEL, VIA 
"AMERICA'S GREATEST RAIL- 



ROAD." 



¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE SENT 
FREE, POST-PAID, ON RECEIPT 
OF A 1-CENT STAMP BY GEORGE 
H. DANIELS, GENERAL PASSENGER 
AGENT, NEW YORK CENTRAL & 
HUDSON RIVER RAILROAD, GRAND 
CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK. 




"GEE!! LET'S GIT." 



xxiv RECREA TION. 



Cruisings in the Cascades 



A NARRATIVE OF 



TRAVEL, EXPLORATION, AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY, 

HUNTING, AND FISHING 

WITH SPECIAL CHAPTERS ON HUNTING THE 

Grizzly Bear, the Buffalo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and Deer; also on 

Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ; on a Cattle Roundup ; 

Life Among the Cowboys, Etc. 

By G. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 

AUTHOR OF "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," "HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE 

BIG HOLE," ETC. 

J2mo. 300 Pages. 75 Illttstr ations. Cloth, $2.00 ; Half Calf, $3.00. 

The learned writer, scientist, and sportsman, Col. W. D. Pickett, better known as 
" P.," says of this book : "The true lover of nature who delights to occasionally escape 
from the annoyances and worriments inseparable from so-called civilized life, and to 
wander amid scenes that tell only of the infinite power, the beneficence, and the grandeur 
of the Great Ruler; who delights to worship in the grandest of all His temples — the 
mountains ; who realizes and feels His presence on every mountain peak, in every dark 
canyon, in every rushing wind, in every gentle zephyr, and who, amid such scenes, 
above all realizes his own weakness and littleness ; he it is who will take pleasure in 
following the author amid some of the grandest and most beautiful scenery on this con- 
tinent. If, added to this, the reader should be imbued with some of the tastes and sym- 
pathies of the sportsman, additional zest will be given in the pleasant, graphic, and truthful 
descriptions of fishing and hunting incidents. The young sportsman who is desirous of 
hunting large game, will find here many indispensable hints as to their habits and the 
best methods of pursuing them. This book will meet with universal favor." 

Mr. T. S. Van Dyke, author of "The Still Hunter," and other popular books, says: 
"It is one of the most entertaining books on field sports yet published. Mr. Shields 
always has something to say, and says it in a way that makes one see it. He is never 
dull, and there is an air of truth about his work that fully satisfies the reader." 

Mr. Orin Belknap, known and loved of all sportsmen by his familiar pseudonym 
" Uncle Fuller," says : " The author of this work has placed the sportsmen of America 
under lasting obligations by his pleasing descriptions of his adventures in the wilds of 
these little-known mountains. Any writer who calls the attention of American sportsmen 
to the wonderful opportunities for legitimate sport — worth a trip across the continent, or 
a life-time of the tame enjoyment of Eastern sportsmanship — hidden away in the mysteri- 
ous gorges of the Cascade range, deserves the thanks of each and all who ever shouldered 
gun or rod. May this book prompt others of America's adventurous lovers of the wilder- 
ness to more thorough search for the hidden wonders of these mighty hills." 

" Boone," the writer of so many charming reminiscences of days among the hills, 
says of this book : " To the reader whose calling in life, or whose personal limitations 
shut him off from the privileges enjoyed by Mr. Shields, there is given in these pagei 
descriptions of scenery so vivid as to enable him to realize the grandeur in nature of the 
land that gives us birth. There are given him descriptions and traits of animals, in their 
wild state and in their native haunts, that he may never see save in collections. Let me 
commend it to all into whose hands this book may come — and they ought to be many — to 
give it a careful, not a cursory reading. On second, and attentive reading, I was really 
struck by the accuracy of the author's descriptions of the bison, elk, antelope, grizzly bear, 
and mountain goat ; and the delineations from his camera make the whole work graphic 
indeed." 

" Sillalicum," another well-known and popular contributor to the sportsmen's journals, 
has this to say : " Mr. Shields evidently saw everything that could interest the sports- 
man, farmer, lumberman, or tourist ; and has described the country and its objects of 
interest in an effective and truthful way, with the eloquence of the artist, and the enthusiasm 
of the sportsman. No book ever published on Western sports is so delightfully written. 
A perusal of its pages places the reader among the scenes described, and he imagines 
himself looking at the rushing schools of salmon ; he hears the murmuring of the moun- 
tain stream ; the whispering of the alpine zephyr ; and can almost catch the gleam of the 
mountain lake as it washes the foot of the cragged peak on which roams the white goat." 



KECREA TION. xxv 



Says W. B. Leffingvvell, the gifted author of " Wild Fowl Shooting," and of " Shooting 
on Upland, Field, and Marsh ": " I have rarely encountered, anywhere, such vivid descrip- 
tions of life in the mountains, as are found in ' Cruisings in the Cascades.' My blood 
tingles as I follow the author, through these pages, in his encounters with the noble game 
he found in the great hills ; and I long to lay aside the cares of business and seek those 
mighty fastnesses wherein he had such grand sport." 

" Men who enjoy jaunts into the woods, in search of big game, will find this book ex- 
tremely interesting." — New York Herald. 

"'Cruisings in the Cascades' is by far the best thing Coquina has ever written." 

— A??ierican Field. 

" It is a handsomely printed and finely illustrated volume, made up of spirited sketches 
of travels, explorations, hunting, and fishing. It is charmingly interesting. The author 
mingles solid facts of great value with accounts of his wild adventures, and tells the story 
in an offhand style that banishes sleep from tired eyes." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

" Mr. Shields handles a much diversified group of subjects with a master hand, and 
adheres throughout to a singularly pleasant and original way of expressing himself. His 
chapter on ' Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ' is as delicious a bit of word-painting as 
we have ever met with." — Sports Afield. 

"'Cruising in the Cascades' is Mr. Shields' latest, and, we think, best publication. 
It will be heartily appreciated by American sportsmen. One of the most important chap- 
ters in the book is that on the Rocky Mountain goat. Heretofore little has been written 
on that animal, and Mr. Shields has treated the subject in a thorough and careful manner. 
He has recorded much valuable matter, with regard to this animal, which can be referred 
to by naturalists and sportsmen with profit. Many of the illustrations in the book are from 
photographs taken by the author, and are unusually good." — Shooting and Fishing. 

" Coquina is widely and favorably known as an entertaining, practical writer on out- 
door sports, and 'Cruisings in the Cascades' will add to a well-earned fame in his special 
field. His pen-pictures of wild life and wild sports, in the Far West, are accompanied by 
many excellent illustrations of fish and game, and of the scenes and places visited, adding 
greatly to the attractive character of the work." — The Ii2depe?ident. 

"The pages are breezy and the illustrations numerous and attractive, the camera 
having been freely used by the author in his travels." — The Bookbuyer. 

" Mr. Shields touches on numerous subjects. Nothing seems to escape his keen eye, 
and whatever he describes becomes vivid to the mind of the reader, full of interest and 
clearly defined. His pen-pictures of hunting adventures, boating, and the sports of the 
ranch, tingle with the warm glow of quickened pulse-beats and rapidly coursing blood." 

— Book Chat. 

"The author's style of writing would make even a dull subject enjoyable, but with 
such a theme — his own extended and rich experience — we have a book whose wide circula- 
tion seems assured. There are enchanting sketches of scenery, pleasing stories of moun- 
tain climbing, of hunting and fishing ; excellent estimates and delineations of Indian 
character, drawn from personal contact ; a fine description of salmon and their habits, and 
such accounts of bear, elk, deer, and goat hunting as to make the blood of the hunter 
tingle in every vein." — Public Opinion. 

"Mr. Shields is not only a hunter, but an angler, and an amateur photographer, and 
on his excursions in the mountains has made good use of his opportunities. As a narra- 
tive of adventure the book is entertaining, and as a record of sport it will delight many 
readers." — The Literary World. 

" It is sure to meet with a large sale." — Chicago Tribune. 

" It is by all odds the most fascinating book on big game hunting ever published." 

— The journalist. 

" The illustrations are, for the most part, made from photographs, and are one of the 
chief charms of the book. Those who have read ' Rustlings in the Rockies,' by the same 
author, are familiar with the charm of his style." — Photographic Times. 

" It is beautifully printed and profusely illustrated, detailing a great variety of ad- 
venture in travel, exploration, hunting, and fishing. Mr. Shields is an enthusiastic lover 
of nature, in all her wilder forms, with an eye quick to see the beauty and grandeur of 
river and plain, and forest and mountain, and a ready pen to describe them. He is a keen 
and tireless sportsman, a quick and accurate judge of men, with that curious quality of 
humor that enables a man to see and enjoy the oddities, even in perilous passages, all 
grounded on the restless spirit of the born rover. To the great majority of men, for 
whom wild adventure possesses an irresistible fascination, this book is full of the most 
absorbing interest." — Chicago Times. 

Mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the Author, 

G. O. SHIELDS, 19 "West 24th Street, New York, 
Or given as a Premium for 5 Subscriptions to Recreation 



XXVI 



RECREA TION. 



TO VACATIONISTS 

SUMMER LITERATURE RELATING TO EASTERN 
HILLS, OCEAN SHORES AND ISLANDS 



Manual of Old Colony Summer Resorts. Contain- 
ing a list of Summer Hotels and Boarding-houses 
within the Old Colony territory ; Excursion Rates, etc. 
It embodies also a list of villages and points of interest 
not on the direct line of the Old Colony System, reached 
by stage or other conveyance. Sent upon receipt of 
two-cent stamp. 

Along the South Shore. A new booklet devoted to 
the advantages, situations, etc., of the " South Shore " 
as an Ocean Summer Resort. It includes all the shore 
territory lying along the Bay coast south of Boston, or 
between Braintree and Duxbury inclusive. For two- 
cent stamp. 

Plymouth as a Summer Resort. A book devoted to 
the attractions, historic associations and localities, and 
natural endowments of ancient Plymouth, as of interest 
to summer visitors and sojourners. Mailed tor two- 
cent stamp. 

Quaint Cape Cod and its Summer Delights. 

"Quaint Cape Cod " presents the claims of that section 
as a Summer Resort, and affords all information regard- 
ing Cape Cod, its localities, scenery, recreative features, 
etc. Sent on receipt of four cents for postage. 

Martha's Vineyard, its Attractions as a Summer 
Resort. Presenting a sketch of the Island of Martha's 
Vineyard, its towns, villages and summering places. 
Sent upon receipt of two-cent stamp. 



Nantucket, an Island in the Ocean. Descriptive of 
Nantucket, its institutions, natural features, attrac- 
tions, etc., with something of its history and character- 
istics. Sent on receipt of two-cent stamp. 

Handbook of Newport, the "Queen of Watering 
Places." Containing general information for visitors, 
concerning walks and drives, location of streets, public 
parks, grounds, estates, their occupants, etc. Sent for 
two-cent stamp. 

A Sketch of Narragansett Pier. A folder descrip- 
tive of this beautiful section, containing historic and 
local matter relating thereto, with such information as 
the visitor or sojourner will find of interest. Mailed 
for two-cent stamp. 

Manual of Summer Resorts on the New Haven 
System. Containing a list of Hotels, Boarding-houses, 
Ticket Rates, Excursion Points, and various informa- 
tion. Mailed on receipt of two-cent stamp. 

The Berkshire Hills. Descriptive of the localities 
along the Berkshire Division of the N. Y.. N. H. & H. 
R. R. ; the natural beauties of the Housatonic River and 
the country through which it flows. Will be sent for 
two-cent stamp. 



Any of the above will be forwarded on receipt of postage stamps as stated. Mention Recreation and 
address O. H. TAYLOR, Gen'l Passenger Agent, Fall River Line, Pier No. 18, North River, New York City; 
A. C. KENDALL, Gen'l Passenger Agent, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. (Old Colony System), Boston, Mass., or C. 
T. HEMPSTEAD, Gen'l Passenger Agent, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. (New Haven System), New Haven, Ct. 




"NOW I'LL JIST FINISH PLANTIN' 'EM, 'N 'EN I'LL TAKE THAT BOODLE HOME.» 



RECREA TION. 



XXVll 



Wanted — A few men to form stock 
company for cattle business. A few thou- 
sand dollars required. Ranch already es- 
tablished. Investment will be safe and will 
pay 40 per cent, profit. Those who are 
fond of hunting and fishing could spend 
a few months each year at the ranch, 
which is beautifully situated near the 
Rocky Mountains. Good cabin and out- 
buildings. Excellent opportunity. Best 
of references given and required. 

Address, " Edgar," 
Room 191, 45 Broadway, New York City. 



WHERE TO GET BIG GAME. 

Have you located your happy hunting 
ground for next fall? If not, I will agree 
to take you to moose, elk, deer, bear, plenty 
of mountain goats, fish and grouse galore, 
providing you wish my services as guide. 
Only 40 miles from the R. R. to the hunt- 
ing grounds. Good pack outfits, tents, 
etc. Horses good and gentle. Terms rea- 
sonable. Best of references; 18 years' ex- 
perience as guide. 

Vic Smith, Anaconda, Mont. 



For Sale — The Vz rater yacht " Die 
Hexe." Built in 1896, of Y% inch planking 
and steam bent timbers, thoroughly fast- 
ened. Has hollow spars throughout, and 2 
full sets of racing sails, consisting of 2 jibs, 
1 balloon jib, 1 square and 1 leg of mutton 
mainsail.^ Is in perfect order and is one 
of the fastest of her class. Address, 

Becker & Murken, 
169 South 4th St., Brooklyn. 



Jas. Ii. McLaughlin:— Experienced 

Guide. Best references furnished. Elk, 
moose, deer, mountain sheep, antelope, 
lions, bear, sage hens and grouse. Best 
trout fishing in the country, within 10 min- 
utes' walk of my ranch. Would take a few 
boarders. Tourist outfits furnished on 
short notice. Address, 

Ishawood, Big Horn Co., Wyoming. 



ANY PARTY 

wanting' to see the 
National Park, 

or to hunt in the 

Teton or Jackson's Hole countries, 

should write me. 

These are the best big- game ranges in the United States. 
Moose, elk, deer, bear, mountain sheep, mountain lions, and all 
kinds of small game abundant; also the best of trout fishine in the 
West. 5 

H/ive put in 16 years hunting, trapping, and guiding in Wyo- 
ming, Idaho, and Montana, and know where to go for any kind of 
game you want. Write me and I will give you full particulars 

GEORGE WINEGAR, St. Anthony, Fremont Co., Idaho. 



For Sale: A new Ideal Loading Ma- 
chine, price $5; 3 Hills Patent Releasing 
Sparrow Traps, $5- Will take $10 cash for 
the 4 articles, or will trade anything use- 
ful, for an equal amount. 
George Burkhardt, 14 Baitz Ave., Buffalo, 

N. Y. 



A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

A WHIsie Pocket Camera, Valued at $5.00 

As a premium for 5 yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation. This Camera makes a picture 2^x2% inches, 
and can be loaded with 24 cut films. You can get the 
5 subscriptions in one hour. 

Write This Office for Camera Catalogue. 



Who wants a Florida home? n^ acres 
of good land ; good house, stable, air, water, 
and healthy country. Fruit — oranges, lemons 
and grapes. Game, such as deer, turkeys, 
quail, rabbits, snipe, woodcock, etc. Price 
$1,000. Terms easy. L. Allen, Oak Hill, Fla. 



KAREZZA 



ETHICS 
OF 

MARRIAGE. 

A bold, brave book teaching ideal marriage, rights o! 
the unborn child,a designed and controlled maternity. 

Union Signal : Thousands of women have blessed 
Dr. Stockham for Tokology, thousands of men and 
women will bless her for Karezza. 

Arena : Karezza is worth its weight in gold. 
Sample pages free. Agents Wanted. Prepaid $1.00. 
ALICE B. STOCKHAM & CO., 277 MADISON ST., CHICAGO. 



For Sale : Two large Moose heads, with 
horns, mounted in first-class style. Spread 
of horns, 50 and 51 inches. Horns uniform 
and perfect. A snap for someone. For par- 
ticulars and price, write 

R. Strutt, Pembroke, Ont., Canada. 



Information about Hotels, Camps, 
Summer Resorts, Farm Board, Outfit for 
Fishing and Hunting, and Guides to Maine 
woods and waters. Reliable. Free. 

Maine Information Bureau, 

Phillips, Maine. 



For Sale: Winchester rifle, model 73; 22 
caliber, Lyman rear sight; in perfect order; 
price, $8.00. 
Louis K. Ervin, Bear Creek, 

Hinds Co., Miss. 



Wanted: Illustrated catalogue of Bal- 
lard rifles. Will pay postage on same. 




AlCO 

Vapor 
Hunting 

Launch 



(The hit of the Sportsman's show.) Motor controlled from bow. 
Valve movement, 12 to 1. 16 to 60 ft. Launches. Twin Screws a 
specialty. 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 12, 14, and 20 h. p. No licensed engineer or 
pilot required. Speed and Safety guaranteed. No dangerous 
Naphtha or Gasoline used. No disagreeable vibration. Send Ten 
Cents in Stamps for 1897 Catalogue. 
MARINE VAPOR ENGINE CO., ft. Jersey Are., Jersey City, N. J. 



Blair's Pills 

Great English Remedy for 

GOUT and RHEUMATISM. 

SAFE, SURE, EFFECTIVE. 
Druggists, or 224 Willia m St., New York., 

'^^TTTTTTTTTTTT T - T .. T T T T T 




XXV111 



RECREA TION. 



The American 
Book of the Dog 

THE ORIGIN, DEVELOPMENT, SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS, 
UTILITY, BREEDING, TRAINING, DISEASES, AND KENNEL 
MANAGEMENT OF ALL IMPORTANT BREEDS OF DOGS 

A Book for Dog Fanciers and Dog Owners 

Edited by G, CX SHIELDS ("Coquina") 

AUTHOR OF " CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," " HUNTING IN THE GREAT 

WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE," "THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA," 

"CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS," ETC. 



8vo, 700 Pages, 85 Illustrations. Cloth, $5.00; Half Morocco, gilt top, $6.50; 

Full Morocco, gilt edges, $8.00 

CONTENTS 



The English Setter. Bernard Waters, Kennel Editor 
The American Field, and author of " Modern Train- 
ing, Handling, and Kennel Management." 

The Irish Setter. Max Wenzel, Secretary The Irish 
Setter Club of America, and B. F. Seitner, Vice- 
President The Pointer Club of America. 

The Gordon Setter. Harry Malcolm, President The 
American Gordon Setter Club. 

The Pointer. Charles K. Westbrook, A. M. 

The Greyhound. Col. Roger D. Williams, President 
The Iroquois Hunting and Riding Club. 

The Deerhound. Dr. Q. Van Hummell. 

The Foxhound. Dr. M. G. Ellzey, Associate Editor 
The National Economist. 

The Bassethound. Lawrence Timpson. 

The Dachshund. William Loeffler. 

The Bloodhound. J. L. Winchell. 

The Russian Wolfhound. William Wade. 

The Beagle. H. F. Schellhass, President The Ameri- 
can-English Beagle Club. 

The Irish Water Spaniel. P. T. Madison, Secretary 
The Indiana Kennel Club. 

The English Water Spaniel. William A. Bruette. 

The Clumber Spaniel. F. H. F. Mercer, Kennel 
Editor Sports Afield. 

The Sussex Spaniel. A. Clinton Wilmerding, President 
The American Spaniel Club. 

The Field Spaniel. J. F. Kirk. 

The Cocker Spaniel. J. Otis Fellows. 

The Fox Terrier. August Belmont, Jr., President The 
American Kennel Club, and The American Fox 
Terrier Club. 



The Yorkshire Terrier. P. H. Coombs. 

The Chesapeake Bay Dog. George W. Kierstead. 

The Bedlington Terrier. W. H. Russell. 

The Irish Terrier. Dr. J. S. Niven. 

The Bull Terrier. Frank F. Dole. 

The White English Terrier. E. F. Burns. 

The Airedale Terrier. F. H. F. Mercer. 

The Scottish Terrier. John H. Naylor. 

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. John H. Naylor. 

The Skye Terrier. Lawrence Timpson. 

The Black and Tan Terrier. Dr. H, T. Foote. 

The Maltese Terrier. Miss A. H. Whitney. 

The Collie. Henry Jarrett and J. E. Dougherty, 

The Old English Sheep Dog. William Wade. 

The Great Dane (German Dogge). Prof. J. H. H. 
Maenner. 

The St. Bernard. F. E. Lamb. 

The Mastiff. William Wade. 

The Newfoundland. L. F. Whitman. 

The Bulldog. John E. Thayer. 

The Dalmatian Coach Dog. Maj. T. J. Woodcock. 

The Poodle. W. R. Furness. 

The Italian Greyhound. Dr. G. Irwin Royce. 

The Pug. G. W. Fisher. 

The Mexican Hairless Dog. Mrs. Elroy Foote. 

The Toy Spaniels. Miss Marion E. Bannister, Secre- 
tary The New York Pet Dog Club. 

The Schipperke. E. R. Spalding. 

Diseases of the Dog, and their Remedies. Dr. J. 
Frank Perry ("Ashmont "), author of " Dogs; Their 
Management and Treatment in Disease." 

Spaniel Training. F. H. F. Mercer. 



The Hon. John S. Wise, the eminent statesman and lawyer, President of the Pointer Club of America, and 
one of the most distinguished sportsmen and dog fanciers in the country, says of this book : 

" In selecting contributors to this work Mr. Shields has displayed rare good judgment. His list of writers 
embraces the names of many gentlemen who are recognized as leading authorities on the subjects of which 
they write. While those articles may, in some cases, be more or less tinged by the peculiar views of their 
authors, the book, thus drawn from many different minds, is not only very eclectic in character, but, in my 
judgment, much more correct and valuable, as a whole, than it could be were it the production of an individual. 

" The book is exceedingly interesting. It is free, too, from the sameness of expression and treatment so 
often found in books of this character, written by one man. It is, moreover, a very instructive book, and of 
practical value, in many features, to the owners and breeders of dogs. 

" A valuable feature of this book is the illustrations. Many of these are artistic and beautiful in a high 
degree. The portraits of several dogs of world wide reputation are shown, and those of many other tvpical 
specimens, less widely known, add to the interest and attractiveness of the work. Nearly every breed is 
illustrated, and of some breeds several good specimens are pictured." 

This book will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by 

G. O. SHIELDS, J9 West 24th Street, New York 

Or given as a Premium for 7 Subscriptions to Recreation 



RECREATION. xxU 



You Get 

the Profits 

Of Dealers, Agents, Jobbers 
and Middlemen by buying di- 
rect from the manufacturer. 




No better wheel made than the 

Acme Bicycle 

Built in oui own factory by 
skilled workmen, using the best 
material and the most improved 
machinery. We have no agents 
Sold direct from factory to the 
rider, f ally warranted. Shipped 
anywhere for examination. 

WRITE FOR 

Our Interesting Offer 

Acme Cycle Co., Elkhart, Ind. 



XXX 



RECREA TION. 



jiaiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiii linn in imiiiiiiimimuiiiiiiiiiiisuiiw; 

I tribune I 
I Bicycles I 




| Oe Best in tbe World ( 

s Send for Catalogue 5 

| THE BLACK MFG. CO. 
5 ERIE, PA.wmr 

Z Mention Recreation. E 

nimiiiiiiiiimmiiiiniimiimiimimmmiiiiitmiimiiir 



Use 




Beforehand 



Then tide your wheel in safety* 
It absolutely prevents punctures. 
We guarantee tires that contain 
Plugine, Easy to apply, Sent 
postpaid on receipt of $1,00, 

The National Specialty CO., 
91 Euclid Svenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 



High 
Grade 




Bicycles 

for Men, Women, Girls & 



.Boys. Complete line at 
(lowest prices ever quoted. 
J$100 'OaUwood' for.fi 4 5.00 
35 'Arlington' " $37.50 
$55 " " $25.00 

$20 Bicycle « $10.75 

$75 'Haywood' Simplest, Strongest Bicycle on Earth " $32.00 
Fully guaranteed. Shipped anywhere C.O.D. with privi- 
lege to examine. No money in advance. Buy direct from 
manufacturers, save agents and dealers profits. Large 
illustrated catalogue free. Address (in full). 
CashBuyers'Union,162W.VanBurenSt.B359Chicago 




"OH, I DUNNO. 



RECREA TION. 



XXXI 



HOW WE GOT HIM. 

C. G. LATHROP. 

My friend and I' were patiently and per- 
sistently wading the deep crusty snow, 
through cedar swamp and marsh, on the 
trail of what we pronounced a moose. 

Our chase lasted all day, leading us far 
into the deep forests, East of the C. & N. 
W. R. and in the direction of the great lakes. 
At last night overtook us in the deep, dark 
forest, and we were obliged to make camp. 
A fire was lighted and the night was spent 
amid the tall pines, which were cracking be- 
neath the howling wind. We welcomed 
the coming of morning, and at daylight 
again set out on the trail of our moose. 
Within 2 hours we arrived at a point which 
showed where he had rested a part of the 
night. A light snow had fallen during the 
night, and he had but just left his resting- 
place. He had headed for a cedar swamp, 
and my friend followed the track, while I 
traveled to the East, following the ridge. 
We were to meet about noon at the East 
end of the swamp. 

An hour had scarcely passed, when the 
crack of my friend's Winchester rang out, 
far to the North of me, and my courage fell, 
for I was sure Brow had bagged the game. 
I sat down on a log to think and to hope 
our moose might leave the swamp and that 
I might yet get a shot with my Marlin. In 
less than 20 minutes I heard a crashing of the 
under brush in the swamp. For a moment 
my heart drummed like a grouse on a hol- 
low log. I leveled my rifle in the direction 
of the noise and awaited the coming of the 
long hunted moose. I did not have long to 
wait, for in an instant the brush parted and, 
with one mighty lunge, a deer struck the 
open ground. Alas this was not the moose! 
I did not lose much time in sizing him up, 
and at the report of my rifle he leaped into 
the air and fell dead. I hung him up, 
dressed him and had scarcely completed my 
work when I was again startled by a noise 
coming from the same direction as before. 
Again I placed my Marlin to my shoulder 
and kept a sharp lookout. Soon I saw a 
white flag move among the bushes. I was 
sure this was some part of the moose so I 
took good aim and fired at what I could see. 
The flag dropped at the report of my rifle, 
and Brow shouted, " Lookout Shep; he's 
my meat." I had shot at the deer which my 
friend was carrying on his shoulder. I had 
not had the buck fever until that moment; 
and would probably have been shaking yet, 
but for the coolness Brow showed. We 
shouldered our 2 small deer and set out 
to the Southeast in the direction of a clear- 
ing, where we would leave our deer before 
again taking up the trail of the moose; as 
neither of us had yet got a glimpse of him. 
Leaving our deer in the edge of the clear- 



ing we followed the big fellow until about 3 
p.m. when he turned to the South; and we 
were again heading in the direction of the 
clearing. When within one mile of the clear- 
ing, to our great joy we saw him about 40 
rods ahead of us. Our 2 rifles were this 
time leveled; one report rang out and 2 
hearts bounded for joy. As the smoke 
cleared we saw the animal moving at an 
unsteady gait. We hurried to the spot and 
found the snow spattered with blood, so we 
followed the trail. 

We moved cautiously and 3 times caught 
sight of him, yet he gave us no show for 
even a snap shot. We finally arrived at the 
edge of the clearing and saw that he had 
gone straight across. My friend took the 
West side and I the East side of the clear- 
ing. We met on the hill, near a basin where 
we saw the moose standing within 25 rods 
of us. Again 2 rifles spoke. He made one 
lunge and fell forward, pierced by 2 bullets. 
Then I heard a shout from the opposite 
side of the basin, " Lookout Shep, he's my 
meat." But this would not go this time, 
and I replied that part of him was my meat. 

He proved to be not a moose after all but 
the largest deer either of us had ever seen. 
He weighed over 300 pounds and we had 
hard work getting him and our 2 small 
deer out of the woods. 



A. D. Porter and J. A. Dales returned 
from their fishing camp, on the Little Man- 
istee river, last night. They were in camp 
3 weeks. It is claimed they caught nearly 
10,000 trout during that time. 

Michigan Exchange. 

Why quit so soon? Did they quit biting? 
Why not stay until you cleaned out the 
stream entirely? No us a leaving any. If 
you did some other hungry hogs, like your- 
selves, will come along and take them. 
You_ might just as well go back and finish 
the job. We all know you have a great 
crop of bristles, without looking for them. 

Editor. 



Daniel Whitehouse, of Augusta, Me., 
caught at Bradley's, East Vassalboro, with 
hook and line and using worms for bait, 3 
landlocked salmon weighing respectively 
zVa-, 2>V\ and 4 l / 2 pounds. Edward Murphy 
took one that weighed 6 l / 2 pounds. 



Hon. P. O. Vickery, of Augusta, Me., 
has been fishing on Swan lake. He was 
accompanied by Hon. H. O. Stanley. Mr. 
Vickery took 6 handsome fish — 3 salmon 
and 3 trout, weighing, all told, 22 pounds. 
The largest of the salmon weighed 6 l / 2 
pounds, and the smallest trout weighed 2^ 
pounds. 



XXX11 



RECREA TION. 



THE BANNER 1 1 III 



Is the Cycle Lamp for '97. 
$0.50 



WITH RIGID BALL-SOCKET 
BRACKET LIKE CUT. 




5J^ IN. HIGH 

HANDSOME ! 
PRACTICAL! HONEST! 

A powerful light -thrower, having- a 
3-Inch Double-Convex Polished Optical Lens. 

REVERSIBLE OIL POT. 

POSITIVE WICK LOCK. 

WON'T JOLT OR BLOW OUT. 

Burns kerosene. Solid Brass, heavily nickelled ; 
no solder. $2.50 like cut. attachment for head 
or forks. $2.50 with spring bracket. Sent, car- 
riage paid, on receipt of price, when not kept by 
dealers. Send for illustrated catalogue. 

& Y n° Pk ' PLUME & ATWOOD MFG. CO. 

$ Chicago. Factories: Waterbury and Thomaston, Conn. 



REGON SHORT LINE R.R. 



Operating 1,421 miles of railroad, through 
the thriving States of UTAH, IDAHO, WY- 
OMING, OREGON and MONTANA. 



The short line to BUTTE and HELENA, 
MONTANA; BOISE CITY, IDAHO; 
PORTLAND, OREGON, and the North 
Pacific Coast. 



The Popular Line to all Utah Mining Dis- 
tricts, The only Road to Mercur, the Johan- 
nesburg of North America. 

The Fastest Service, in connection with the 
UNION PACIFIC SYSTEM, to all points 
West. 

Buy your Tickets to the West and North- 
west via the OREGON SHORT LINE, the 
Fastest and Best Railroad. 



General Offices, 201 S.'Main St., Salt Lake City 



S. W. ECCLES 

Gen'l Traffic Man 



D. E. BURLEY 

Gen' l Pass, and Ticket Agent 

W. H. BANCROFT 

Vice-President and General Manager 



You Travel ? 



neiw ran swrano. 




SHIP YOUR WHEEL IN THE 

Streat Collapsible 
Bicycle Crate 

Always ready for use. 

Can crate your wheel in less than five 
minutes without the aid of a single tool, 
with pedals and all on. 

Price, $4; with Canvas Curtains, $6 

BOOKLET FREE 

HERBERT G. STREAT, Manufacturer 
281 West 128th Street, New York 



NOVA SCOTIA'S FULL OF FISH 

Ever tried Tusket or Maitland River for 
trout ? There's famous fishing there. No- 
thing in the United States compares with it. 
The Tusket region is just back of Yar- 
mouth; Maitland River is a little farther in. 
It's a quick sail from Boston to Yarmouth — 
only 1 7 hours. 

A PERFECT VACATION LAND 

is Nova Scotia, whether you want to fish, 
boat, or just loaf— delightful climate, fine 
scenery, good roads, and there's boating 
everywhere, and it's 

A DELIGHTFUL TRIP 

going by the steamers " Boston " or " Yar- 
mouth," of the Yarmouth Steamship Co., 
the finest and fastest steamers leaving Boston. 
They leave Pier 1, Lewis Wharf, Boston, 
every Tuesday, and Friday at 12 o'clock, 
noon, during April, May, and June. Com- 
mencing June 24, they will leave every 
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday at 
12 o'clock, noon. " Beautiful Nova Scotia," 
our new 1897 Guide Book, handsome, en- 
tertaining, profusely illustrated, sent on re- 
ceipt of 10 cents. For folders and informa- 
tion, write 

J. F. SPINNEY, Agent 

YARMOUTH STEAMSHIP CO. 

43 LEWIS WHARF 



RECREA TION. 



XXXlil 




FATHER TIME : " What are you doing with that gun, kid ? " 

CUPID : 4i Well, you see these bicyclists were too rapid for my old fashioned bow and arrows — 

BUT I GET 'EM ALL, NOW." 

Cbe Prospect Rouse 







i 



AytMoUNlAlNlA^EL 

ft - - G' "Hamilton County 

(1 -^Kf*^ 



L^c^S. 



03»<ES>oaoo<£^>oa»o<=s>o:>»< 



=>«fl 



...Blue flountain Lake 



LARGEST and finest hotel in the Adiron- 
dacks* Electric light, elevator, heated 
by steam, open fireplaces, hot and cold water 
baths* Finest hunting and fishing in the 
Adirondack?, over J 00 deer being shot within 
two miles of the hotel in the season of f 896. 
There are over 30 ponds and lakes that can be 
reached for hunting and fishing purposes by 
leaving the hotel in the morning and returning 
the same day. 



For terms and particulars, apply to 



Prospect House 



REACHED BY NEW YORK CENTRAL 

AND DELAWARE AND HUDSON R. R. 



Blue Mountain Lake, Hamilton Co*, N. Y. 



XXXIV 



RECREA TJON. 



LONG BRANCH AND BACK, 50c. Baggage 

ASBURY PARK AND BACK, 80c. Checked Free 

: PATTEN LINE : 

N. Y. and Long Branch Steamboat Co. 

•Tlary Patten" "Pleasure Bay" "Elberon" 
TIME TABLE, JUNE 1st, 1897 

"Down the Bay." " Through the Narrows." "Up 
the Picturesque Shrewsbury." 

Pier in New York, Foot of West 13th Street. 
Battery Landing Near Barge Office. 

WEEK DAYS: 

Leave New York, Foot of Bloomfield Street 
8:30 and 9 A. M. 2:40 P. M. 

Leave Battery (Near Barge Office) 

8:55 and 9:30 A. M. 3:05 P. M. 

Arrive Long Branch, 12 M., 12:30, and 6 P. M. 

A. M. P. M. P. M. 

Leave Branchport, 7:00 4:00 5:00 

Leave Rockwell Avenue, . . . 7:10 4:10 5:10 

Leave Pleasure Bay, 7:20 4:20 5:20 

Leave Seabright, 7:45 4:45 5:45 

Arrive New York, 10:15 7:15 8:00 

For the greater accommodation of through pas- 
sengers, we have decided to make the steamer leaving 
New York at 8:30 A. M. (Battery 8:55) an " Express 
Boat," running through to Pleasure Bay, without stop, 
in three hours. 

SUNDAYS: 

Leave New York, Foot Bloomfield St., 8:30 and 9 A. M. 

Leave Battery, 8:55 and 9:20 A. M. 

P. M. P. M. 

Leave Branchport 4:00 5:00 

Leave Rockwell Avenue, 4:10 5:10 

Leave Pleasure Bay 4:20 5:20 

Leave Seabright, 4:45 5:45 

The afternoon boat from New York connects at 
Seabright with boat returning to New York at 5:45. 
" The Surf Always in View." 

Freight for Asbury Park or Ocean Grove carefully 
handled at lowest rates. 



Amateur Photographers 

WILL FIND THAT THE 



Presents most delightful and varied Scenery 
for Photographing and Sketching. Its 
Mountains, Woodlands, Streams, Lakes, 
and Valleys, provide subjects for an 

Infinite Uariety of Pictorial 6cms « « « « 

THE HUDSON RIVER 

THE CATSKILL MOUNTAINS 

THE MOHAWK VALLEY 
THE NIAGARA FALLS 

All contribute to make this the most desirable route 
for persons of artistic temperament. 



Five elegant Fast Trains with through Sleeping Cars 
to Kingston, Albany, Utica, Syracuse, Roches- 
ter, Niagara Falls, Toronto, Cleveland, 
Detroit, Chicago, and St. Louis. 



DIRECT ROUTE to the Adirondacks, making 
close connections with railways, steamers, and stages 
for all the choice hunting and fishing grounds of that 
delightful region. 

For information, address 

H.B.JAOOE.O.E. Pass.Agt. J.WOLFE.Gen. Agt. 
363 Broadway, New York Albany, N. Y. 

C E. LAMBERT, Gen. Pass, Agent 
Vanderbilt Avenue, New York 



n Summer 



at THE ISLES 
OF SHOALS 

Is equivalent to a long ocean voyage. 
Ten miles at sea, possessing an unequaled 
climate, and wonderful natural attrac- 
tions, the islands have been the leading 
ocean resort for twenty years. Immu- 
nity from hay fever guaranteed. The 
finest fishing, bathing, boating, yachting, 
and all in-door and out-door amuse- 
ments. 

Send for illustrated booklet to 

OCEANIC HOTEL 

Isles of Shoals 

Off Portsmouth, N. H. 

H. G. MARVIN, Manager. 



THE,.. 



ADIRONDACK... 

MOUNTAINS «££. 

"THE GREAT NORTH WOODS." 

A marvelous wilderness, abounding in beauti- 
ful lakes, rivers and brooks, filled with the great- 
est variety of fish. 

An immense extent of primeval forest, where 
game of all kinds is to be found. 

This wonderful region— located in Northern 
New York— is reached from Chicago by all lines, 
in connection with the New York Central ; from 
St. Louis by all lines in connection with the New 
York Central ; from Cincinnati by all lines in 
connection with the New York Central ; from 
Montreal by the New York Central ; from Bos- 
ton by a through car over the Boston & Albany, 
in connection with the New York Central ; from 
New York by the through car lines of the New 
York Central ; from Buffalo and Niagara Falls 
by the New York Central. 



A 32-page folder and map entitled " The Adirondack 
Mountains and How to Reach Them " sent free, post- 
paid, to any address, on receipt of a i-cent stamp by 
George H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, New 
York Central & Hudson River Railroad, Grand Cen- 
tral Station, New York. 



RECREA TION. 



XXXV 



■9 



Press Button f^nifc 



FOR 



Hunting, Fishing and Camping 



Can be Opened Instantly 
with One Hand by Slightly 
Pressing the Button : : : : 



"■-■ 



Our 4-inch or 5-inch jack-knife is in- 
valuable in emergencies when you need a 
strong knife quickly. Press button and 
blade is open for use. 

Four-inch Blade, Stag Handle, . . . . $1.00 
Five-inch Blade, Stag Handle, .... 1.25 

SENT POSTPAID 



LOTT 
& 
SCHMITT 

112-114 Walker Street 

NEW YORK 



LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S 

POCKET KNIFE 

AS CUT 

In Sterling Silver, $1.75 

In Pearl, Plain, 1.50 

In Ivory, Plain, 1.25 

In Stag, Plain, 1.00 

In Ebony, Plain, I>co 

SENT POSTPAID 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED 
CATALOG 





" Blanche got even with that old maga- 
zine editor who declined her poem." 

"What did she do?" 

" She went back while he was at lunch, 
and altered his sign to read: 'This is my 
boozy day.' " 



" Somebody says the bath tub is the 
badge of civilization." 

" I don't know about that; the biggest 
bores on earth are the people who brag 
about how often they bathe." 



Sing a song of sixpence — 

A pocket full of rye; 
Four and twenty blackbirds 

Baked in a pie. 
Do the women eat it? 

Yes — but what of that? 
All they object to — is 

Blackbirds on a hat. 



in 



" Bridget looks strong enough 
arms to make a crack pitcher." 

" Well — she's next thing to it — she's 
pitcher-cracker." 



the 






» A Trial will Convince You that 

GOLDEN SCEPTRE 

SMOKING TOBACCO 

I Is Almost Perfection. We will send on receipt 
I of 10c. a sample to any address. Prices of Golden 
I Sceptre, 1 lb., $1.30 ; U lb.,40 cts. , postage paid, 

CATALOGUE FREE. 

SURBRUG, 159 Fulton Street, New York City. 



XXXVI 



RECREA TION. 



FOR SALE 

A fine S. Lawrence Skiff, with complete 
outfit for rowing and sailing. 

Address Box 640, Hartford, Ct. 



For Sale Cheap : Two black and white 
fine bred dog hound pups. Half beagle. 
Or will exchange for lens or camera. Photo 
of dogs sent on request. Address 

H. D. L., Box 218, Crown Point, N. Y. 



ON A YACHT 



or in the woods — camp- 
ing out or in a cottage — 
wherever you have any- 
thing to cook or water toheat,this little 

LAMP STOVE S?^ 

Saves room and bother. Holds3qts.of 
oil and burns 24 hours with one filling. 
Sent anywhere, securely %*~% 00 
packed, on receipt of ••^•VFVF* 
Complete Catalogue sent FREE on 
application. Address Dept. R. E. 

THE ROCHESTER LAMP CO. 

42 Park PI. and 37 Barclay St., 

NEW YORK CITY. 



the Declaration of Impendence 
and tHuiiins' Boat Catalogue** 



Are two documents that should be read by every true 
patriot and sportsman on the Fourth of July. The latter 
gives a full description of MULLINS' PATENT SHEET 
METAL BOATS. The handsomest and most durable 
boats on the market. Need no repairs. Practically non-sinkable. We solicit your correspondence. 




W. H. MULLINS, 



228 DEPOT STREET, SALEM, OHIO 



Sectional View 





Don' t believe imitators of "HENDRYX" standard 

goods when they say their Fishing Reels "are NOW 

as good as HEN DRYX". The fact that they 

jffl ^'■■ywj-ft i'm i>a rp proves the * " H E N DRYX ' ' is the recognized 



4a- 

Globe Bearing. 



standard line of Fishing Reels. Ask your dealer for 

them. 
The Andrew b. Hendryx Co., New Haven, Conn.. U. S. A. 





LYMAN'S RIFLE SIGHTS. 

Send for 96 Page Catalogue of 

Sights anil Fine Snooting 

WiLUAM LYMAN, Mlddlefield, Conn. 




D. N. 



BRN A BICYCLE 

600 Second Hand Wheels. All 
Makes. Good as new. $6to*15. 
New High Grade '96 models, 
fully guaranteed, $17 to *25. 
Special Clearing Sale. 
Snip anywhere on approval. 
&3~V?e will give a responsible agent 
in each town free use of sample wheel 
to introduce them. Our reputation is 
well known throughout the country. 
Write gt once for oat special offer. 
MEADE & PRENTISS, CHICAGO. 



J. B. CROOK & CO. Established 1837 

1180 Broadway, Cor. 28th Street 

Manufacturers and NEW YORK CITY, U. S. A. 

Importers of 

HIGHEST FISHING HIGHEST 
GRADE TACKLE GRADE 

SPECIALTIES FOR 1897 

Featherweight Rods, Aluminum Reels 
Trout and Salmon Flies 

The only Waterproof Fly Lines : The London Black 
or Trout, Salmon, and Black Bass. 
Send for catalogue. Mention Recreation. 



RECREA TION. 



xxxvii 




XXXV111 



RECREA TION. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF IT. 

Enclosed please find $i, for renewal of 
my subscription to Recreation. My boys 
would put me out of the house, if I did not 
get it regularly. Please change the address 
from my office to my house, as they bother 
the life out of me, every month, asking, 
" Has Recreation come yet? Tie a string 
on your finger; then you won't forget to 
bring it home." 
Geo. F. Scannell, 48 E. 30th Street, N. Y. 



At first I refused to subscribe for Recre- 
ation, but when I got one copy from an 
agent, I gave him my subscription the next 
day. Now I am always looking forward for 
the time when the next number will come. 
Wm. E. Weisheit, Albany, N. Y. 



I am greatly pleased with Recreation. 
It requires little work to get up a club. All 
that is necessary is to show a copy to any 
one interested in any or all of the different 
lines of sport of which it treats. 

C. J. McKay, Fonda, N. Y. 



I am very much pleased with Recrea- 
tion. It seems to improve with age. It 
stands alone as the best of sportsmen's 
papers. I recommend it heartily to all my 
friends. 

Paul J. Huelser, Brooklyn. 



I began taking Recreation last August 
and like it very much. I wish it would 
come every week. Hope you will have the 
50,000 subscribers before December, '97. 
Albert L. Hill, Derry, N. H. 



Recreation is the best magazine I ever 
read. I have read 4 other sportsmen's 
journals, but yours is far ahead of them. I 
take great interest in your puzzle page. 
J. B. Watkins, Albany, N. Y. 



Recreation is the boss sportsmen's 
periodical of the country. There are 3 or 4 
coming to this town, but Recreation takes 
the doughnut, every time. 

H. S. Vogler, Young America, Minn. 



I have only been a subscriber since Jan- 
uary, but am already in love with Recrea- 
tion. It is the greatest value for the money 
ever offered. 

P. S. Miller, Stillwater, N. Y. 



I received my first copy of Recreation 
last week and it is a dandy. It is simply out 
of sight. Every sportsman should sub- 
scribe. 

F. A. Bill, Lockeport, Canada. 



Recreation is the " only shirt in the 
laundry." Hope it will still continue to take 
sweep stakes as " the Magazine." 

C. G. Porter, Springdale, Pa. 



I enclose $1 for renewal of my subscrip- 
tion to Recreation. I cannot keep house 
now without Recreation. 

O. F. Bike, Jackson's Hole, Wyo. 



I think Recreation is about as neat and 
newsy a Magazine as is printed. Am al- 
ways glad when it comes. 

Geo. E. Long, Cleghorn, la. 



Recreation is a dandy. It grows better 
and better and I look forward to its coming 
with the keenest delight. 

Frank A. Dykeman, Catskill, N. Y. 



I have read Recreation for the last 2 
years, and it is the best sportsmen's maga- 
zine I have ever seen. 

Lyle H. Thomas, Frankford, Pa. 



Enclosed find $1 for renewal of my sub- 
scription to Recreation. I can't do with- 
out it. 

C. C. Bailey, Cookshire, Que. 



Have been reading Recreation for the 
last 2 years and could not get along without 
it. B. D. Hilford, Rudolph, O. 



I find Recreation one of the most in- 
teresting magazines I have ever read. 

R. A. Backman, Lunenburg, N. S. 



Cannot get along without Recreation. 
It's the boss, and no mistake. 

C. M. Allen, Marshfield, Wis. 



Recreation is the best monthly pub- 
lished. I only wish it came semi-weekly. 
Arthur Sussman, Long Branch, N. J. 



I am a reader of Recreation and think 
it is the only true sportsmen's journal go- 
ing. Roy Camp, De Kalb, 111. 



I like Recreation very much. The pict- 
ures being particularly fine. 

Daniel A.Duryee, Everett, Wash. 



I have been reading Recreation several 
years and value it above all other magazines 
of its class. 

Joseph Stuart, New York City. 



Recreation is the ideal publication of 
its class. 

J. W. Durham, Lockland, Ky. 



RECREATION. 



XXXIX 



Ok ant® 
Piano 



^e^c STYLE 7. 




You do not have to 
pay an extravagant 
price for a first- 
class piano ««««««« 



In justice to your- 
self write for prices 
of the Wing Piano 
before you buy «««« 




The Instrumental Attachments 

imitates perfectly the tone of the Mandolin, Guitar, Harp, Zither and Banjo, 
giving the effect of an entire orchestra of these instruments playing in concert 
with the piano <£ <£ &<£& 

§[[ N"|" 0N TRIAL « ^ e w '^ sen£ * * n ' s P iano » or vour choice of four other styles, 

to any part of the United States On Trial (all freights 

paid by us), allow ample time for a thorough examination and trial in the home, and, 
if the instrument is at all unsatisfactory, we will take it back at our own expense. No 
conditions are attached to this trial. We ask no advance payment; no deposit. We 
pay all freights in advance. 

OLD INSTRUMENTS EXCHANGED 
EASY PAYMENTS 

OUR BOOK should be in the hands of every one who intends to buy a piano. It contains many 
valuable hints and instructions, and tells a great many things every buyer ought to know. We will send 
it free with our catalogue to any one who writes us. 

443 and 445 West 13th St., N. Y. City 

ESTABLISHED 1868 



WING & SON, 



zl 



RECREATION. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF THE PRE- 
MIUMS. 

The enclosed order for $15 is for 15 sub- 
scriptions for Recreation. The names 
and addresses you will find attached, for 
which you may send me the Premo B. 
camera. The premiums I received from 
you, for the other 2 clubs I sent you a short 
time ago, were more than satisfactory. This 
makes 3 clubs I have sent you, in less than 
3 months, and have received, in premiums, 
full value for same, for which accept my 
thanks. I have another club started, at this 
writing. It is no trouble at all to get sub- 
scribers for Recreation. It is the best 
sportsmen's magazine published. It pleases 
them all. 

Geo. Rushton, Cologne, Minn. 



I have received the Marlin rifle for the 25 
subscriptions, and to say I am pleased with 
it does not express my gratitude. I have 
tried it thoroughly and find it is not a toy, 
but exactly what Marlins claim for it. I 
have got my brother - in - lav/, of Danbury, 
Conn, working for you, and he has already 
(in, 2 days) booked 19 names. He is start- 
ing out for 35 subscriptions and if I don't 
try and get up another club will help him 
out in his. It is an honor to say I got my 
rifle and trappings all for nothing, or for a 
few hours' work. 

Howard M. Judd, Bethel, Conn. 



It is with great pleasure that I announce 
the receipt of the 2 beautiful Marlin rifles, 
direct from the Marlin Arms Company, and 
they are all any sportsman could wish. I 
have tried them both and am well pleased 
with them. No one can afford to be with- 
out 1 of these guns, if he is a lover of hunt- 
ing. I thank Recreation for the splendid 
treatment and opportunities that have en- 
abled me to become the proud possessor of 
2 such fine guns. 

O. H. Odell, Sidney, O. 



Let me extend my sincere thanks for your 
most generous present (for such it is) for 
the 35 subscribers to Recreation which I 
have sent you. The Ithaca gun received is 
not (as I supposed it would be) a cheap, 
roughly made, ungainly one, but is a 
beauty, well made, well balanced and a first 
class shooter. I have already showed it, 
with a good deal of satisfaction, and with a 
loud voice for the goodness of Recrea- 
tion. I certainly shall not forget you. 
V. J. Elliott, Jackson, Mich. 



I received the Bristol steel fishing rod, 
and the Yawman & Erbe automatic reel, 
that you ordered for me as premiums 
for 20 subscribers to Recreation, and they 
are just what I wanted, and just what you 



represented them to be. I thank you for 
your promptness and liberality. Will con- 
tinue my canvass for subscribers to your 
excellent Recreation. 

H. O. Matter, Harrisburg, Pa. 



I thank you for the Premo D. Camera. 
It is a beauty. Have taken some good 
pictures with it. I also wish to thank you 
again for the 32-40 Marlin rifle. Have 
given it a good test, and it will do more 
than it is advertised to do. It will carry 
300 yards point blank, and that is about 150 
yards better than I expected. I wish Rec- 
reation the best of success. 

O. E. Loomis, Akron, O. 



I have received the repeating rifle, sent 
me as a premium, and do not see how on 
earth you can give such valuable premiums 
for so few subscribers. Let me thank you 
for such a handsome gift. I shall not lose 
interest in the king of sportsmen's maga- 
zines, but will do my best to increase its 
circulation, as far as lies in my power. 
P. W. Tooth, Bath-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



My new Premo camera is a dandy. I re- 
ceived it last Friday evening. Have made 
4 exposures with it, and they are all fine. 
I always intended to buy a Premo, but I 
found something better than buying one. 
I was about 2 weeks getting the subscribers 
and it was easy work. This is a good way 
to get a No. 1 camera. 

R. J. Bugbee, Ferndale, Cal. ■ 



The Bristol steel rods came to hand to- 
day, after a week's patient delay. They are 
beauties and I thank you heartily for them. 
In a short time I shall send you another 
club. The Bristol steel rods are the finest 
I ever saw, and I can hardly wait till the 
spring opens up sufficiently so that I can 
test them. 

Edwin Morgan, Alliance, O. 



The Forehand gun you sent me, for 35 
subscriptions, received, and to say that I 
am well pleased with it is putting it mildly. 
For beauty and workmanship I do not 
think it can be beat. I have owned several 
guns but the Forehand comes nearer filling 
the bill than any I ever had. Many thanks 
to you and the Forehand Company. 

W. S. Lander, Bloomington, 111. 



I wish to thank you for the Syracuse gun 
I received as a premium. I have given it a 
thorough trial, and am more than satisfied 
with it. It is a close, hard shooter. It sur- 
prised people around here greatly. I made 
some long shots at doves with it, last sum- 
mer, and I cannot thank you enough for it. 
W. H. Carman, Dunellen, N. J. 



RECREA TION. 



xli 



.... FISHING .... 
AND HUNTING 
....REGIONS.... 
...OF MAINE... 

REACHED BY THE 

Bangor & Aroostook Railroad 




The lakes and ponds teem with the most gamy 
of game fish; the speckled square-tailed trout, 
salmon, pickerel and togue. 
Visit such places as the 

MOOSEHEAD LAKE REGION 
PENOBSCOT RIVER REGION 
BIG MACHIAS LAKES 
FISH RIVER REGION 
AROOSTOOK RIVER REGION 
THE KATAHDIN PONDS 
The Sportsmen's Paradise of the World ! 
The shipment of game by visiting sportsmen from 
our stations greater than from all New England put 

0gC Sh?pped in October, November and December, 
1896 : 2T245 Deer, 133 Moose, 130 Caribou 15 Bears. 

Through trains with Pullman Buffet Cars into the 
very heart of the wilderness. For an illustrated guide 
book, containing maps, rates of fare, etc., enclose two 
2C stamps to the General Passenger Agent. 

F. W. CRAM 

Vice President and General Managei 

GEO. M. HOUGHTON 

General Passenger and Ticket Agent 

General Offices', Bangor, Me. 



A New Lake 
and New Trout 

Rear Admiral Beardslee, of the Pacific 
Coast Squadron, U. S. N., about a year ago 
brought to the attention" of tourists and 
anglers a beautiful lake in Northwestern 
Washington, that contains new varieties of 
montrous trout. 

President Jordan of Stanford University, 
California, an authority on fishes, pro- 
nounced them entirely new to science. They 
are very large, weighing from 10 to 13 pounds 
and ranging from 10 to 30 inches in length. 
They are caught by trolling, at a distance of 
30 feet or more below the lake's surface, and 
are the gamiest sort of trout, full of fight. 
Already, anglers have gone from the far 
east to Lake Crescent to enjoy the rare sport 
found there. 

A long chapter oh this beautiful lake and 
its finny inhabitants, located in the heart of 
the Olympic Mountains, is found in the 
Northern Pacific New Tourist Book, Wonder- 
land '97. Send six cents for it to 

CHAS. S. FEE 

General Passenger Agent 
Su Paul, Minn . 



...CO ' W Pleasure Resorts of... 

£exa$ and Gulf of Mexico 



TAKE 




Via CHICAGO, KANSAS CITY, or 
ST. LOUIS 

WAGNER BUFFET SLEEPERS 

FREE " KATY » CHAIR CARS 

For further information, address 

W. S. ST. GEORGE, Gen. East. Agt. 
409 Broadway, New York 




NARROW_TREAD 

The Only Mechanically 
Correct Wheel on Earth. 

Only Correct Crank The Racycle crank hanger 

1 Hanger Made. Jj as f rom 2 q per cen t. to 30 

per cent, less pressure on 
the bearings than the crank 
hanger of any other bicycle 
on the market. 

$1000 iq casfi 

will be paid to the first per- 
son who can demonstrate 
that the above assertion is 
not a fact. No cycle con- 
sidered without the consent 
of the maker. All infringe- 
ments barred. Address all 
communications to 

RACYCLE 
ftliddletown, O. 



OUR 

Crank Hanger 

Does It! 

Special Racycle, N. T's, S10O 
Special Racycle T'dems, 150 
Racycle, N. T's, - - - 75 
Our Bicycles, .... 50 

AGENTS WANTED. 

Write for Terms. 
CHICAGO, 323 Wabash Ave 
NEW YORK, 108 Fulton St. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. Model.Vo. S-$ 1 OO. 

MIAMI CYCLE & MFG. CO., Middletown, 0. 





xlii 



RECREA TION. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF IT. 

Recreation is the best magazine pub- 
lished, and every sportsman should take it. 
It is interesting from the first page to the 
last; so much so that I can hardly wait for 
the news agent to tell me it has arrived. I 
have only one objection to it, and that is it 
does not come often enough. 

J. T. Gale, Bethany, Mo. 



I enclose my check for $2 for 2 years' sub- 
scription to Recreation. I have taken a 
great deal of pleasure reading it, since I 
handed you my subscription at the first 
Sportsmen's Show, 3 years ago. The book 
grows better and better each month. 

R. C. Reed, Fair Haven, Vt. 



I send you this day $1 to renew my sub- 
scription to Recreation. I ought to stop 
it on account of the row it makes in the 
family, every month, when it comes. They 
all want to read it first, but I am .too selfish 
and can't do without it myself. 

M. H. Warner, Ten Sleep, Wyo. 



Recreation is the best magazine I have 
ever read, and I will always speak a good 
word in its favor, whenever I have a chance. 
Will do all I can to help enlarge its circula- 
tion; for it deserves all the praise any one 
can give it. You have my best wishes for 
success. H. R. Rush, Lynn, Mass. 



Recreation and its advertisers are the 
fairest and squarest of their kind. I am 
glad to see you rub it into the fish and game 
hogs. I have just finished reading the cur- 
rent number of Recreation, and I am anx- 
iously awaiting the next. 

Frank Greenhalgh, Paterson, N. J. 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's mag- 
azine published. When I want to go hunt- 
ing or fishing, and have no time to go, I 
read Recreation, and it fills the bill. 

Theo. Lohr, New York. 



I want to thank you for making Recrea- 
tion such a bright, and attractive maga- 
zine, and you can depend on me as a sub- 
scriber as long as I live. 

August Ginter, Peotone, 111. 



Enclosed find $1 for another year of Rec- 
reation. I really enjoy it more than any 
of the other sportsmen's periodicals, and I 
take them all. 

Dr. E. R. Kellogg, Chicago, 111. 



Recreation is surely a thing of beauty. 
We intend having the volumes bound. 

Mrs. M. H. Littell, Dallas, Texas. 



Recreation is far ahead of any periodi- 
cal of its kind. Any one who loves the 
woods and streams can but admire it. 

C. W. Perry, Helena, Mont. 



Your mode of giving the fish and game 
hogs the " hot foot " is a source of gratifi- 
cation to the old sportsmen here. 

Walter I. Shay, Marysville, Mont. 



I am delighted with your wonderful 
book, Recreation. It teaches one more 
than any other book of its class. 

Geo. Colgan, Haverhill, Mass. 



All sportsmen should study Recreation 
well. If they would do so, there would be 
more game in the country. 



ill Lil^. VUU11H J», 

D. Barely, Bloomington, 111. 



Recreation is the best thing of the kind 
I have ever read. I am pleased to intro- 
duce it to my friends. 

C. T. Tupper, George, Iowa. 



Your magazine takes the cake. The 
stories are great, and the half tones the best 
I ever saw. 

L. A. Chapman, Dorchester, Mass. 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's mag- 
azine in the world. It should be in the 
hands of every intelligent family in 
America. 

L. O. Lohr, Orange City, la. 



Hope Recreation will soon be found in 
every home, for it is pure, healthful reading 
for all. 

Mrs. D. C. Bryant, Omaha, Neb. 



I look with pleasure for the 1st of each 
month, for then Recreation comes. 
Chas. A. Patterson, Park Avenue, and 34th 

Street. 



The May number of Recreation is a 
beauty and it secured 4 subscribers yester- 
day. W. R. Coleman, Massilon, O. 



I congratulate you on the fact that Rec- 
reation is getting better each month. 

J. H. Madsen, Winnetka, 111. 



Yours is the magazine for me. 

J. H. Jenny, Jr., Merrill, Wis. 

Recreation is a hummer. 

F. M. Thomas, Catskill, N. Y. 



RECREA TION. 



xliii 



ASHLAND 
HOUSE 



FOURTH AVE. 
and 24th ST. 

Two blocks from 
Madison Sq. Garden 



...HEADQUARTERS FOR SPORTSMEN 

American and «■. 

European Plan 

RATES: 

Rooms, with board, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 per day 
Rooms, without board, • $1.00 and upwards 
Breakfast, » - • • 75 cents 

Lunch, - - - • 50 " 

Table d' Hote Dinner, - - 75 " 



PROVIDENCE LINE 

For BOSTON, WORCESTER, the NORTH and EAST. Tha 
Rhode Island and Massachusetts leave NEW PIER '.Hi, 
N. R., one block above Canal St., at 5.30 J'- M., daily, 
except Sunday. Shortest rail ride. FINE ORCHESTRA 
on each steamer. 



STONINUTON LINE for Narra^ansett Pier, Watch 
Hill, all points East. Steamers MAIJSK and NEW HAMP- 
SHIRE leave Pier 36, N. R., daily, at 6 P. M. 



The Phillips Phonograph (Maine) 

is doing more for the woods there than any- 
body or anything else but the fish and game. 
SEND FOR A COPY — IT'S GAMY EVEN NOW. 



RUPTURE 



ABSOLUTELY 
CURED 



without truss, operation or con- 
finement, on strictly scientific 
professional principles, based on 
an experience of many years. 
My method of treatment is known only to myself, and I object to long 
letters explanatory thereof. An interview is positively necessary for those re- 
quiring information. 

Complete cure effected in 6 to 8 weeks ; one treatment each week, 
with no detention whatever from business. 

SAOREDO 

Care F. C. PRESTON, 98 Hudson Street, New York 



Manufacturers of the celebrated Gold Medal 
Camp and Folding Furniture, and 
Folding Portable Bath-tubs, 



GOLD MEDAL CAMP FURNITURE MANUFACTURING CO., RAC AMr>Ar s - 

None so Portable, none so Thoroughly 
Good and none so Comfortable. 

Thiscut represents our Gold Medal Fold- 
ing Bath-tub. These have been in use a 
year and have proved entirely satisfactory. 
The frame is constructed with our patent 
metal joints, in such a way that it folds in an 
exceedingly small space. The cover is 
made of very heavy, closely woven duck, 
coated with pure, thoroughly refined rubber, 
cured in such a way that it is tough and 
elastic. The duck is specially rubbered for 
us and we warrant it not to crack. This tub 
is made with no separate parts and is so 
arranged that it can be picked up and car- 
ried even when it contains water for the 
bath ; and empties by simply raising one 
p-r.gCjIfj f)f| end, the other forming- a trough through 
* HBBipiUiUU w hich the water is poured into a pail. It is 
in every way a practical bath-tub, strong 
enough to hold the heaviest person, and will 
last ageneration. Folds 5 ft. by 5 in. square. 
Sendforfree Catalogue of Camp and Fold- 
ing Furniture and Bath-tubs. 




Look for our 
GOLD MEDAL 
CAMP BED in 
this space next month 



GOLD MEDAL 
FOLDING BATH-TUB 

AGENTO WANTED. Mention 
Write for Discounts. Recreation 



Wyoming... 

For Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Deer, Elk, 
Fish, Goat, Moose, Sheep, Grouse, 
Duck, and Sage Chicken Shooting, 

address H. D. DcKALB, BIG PlNEY, WYO. 



ADIRONDACK LANDS 

** GAME PRESERVES POTTAGE SITES 



FOR SALE in Virion. P»rU of Ih.t 
Region; Suitable for GRAND PARKS- 

GAME PRESERVES COTTAGE SITES. FOREST LANDOO.. SYRACUSE. N.T. 

IN ANSWERING ADS, IF YOU 
WILL KINDLY MENTION REC- 
REATION YOU WILL GREATLY 
OBLIGE THE EDITOR. 



A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

A Willsie Pocket Camera, Valued at $5.00 

As a premium for 5 yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation. This Camera makes a picture 2^x2^6 inches, 
and can be loaded with 24 cut films. You can get the 
5 subscriptions in one hour. 

Write This Office for Camera Catalogue. 



Cycle Touring in England at small ex- 
pense. All about it, for 25c. 

Arthur Munson, Stamford, Ct. 



xliv 



RECREATION. 



This is a picture of Sewell New- 
house, inventor of the celebrated 

NEWHOISE STEEL TRAPS 

known the world over as the 
best traps made for catching fur- 
bearing animals. Send to 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Ltd., Kenwood, N. Y. 

for catalogs, prices and discounts. 





The 



Operaphone 



■with it every word from the stage or platform can he heard in perfectly 
natural tones, hy those sitting in remote parts of the Theatre, Opera 
House, Lecture Room or Church. By using the OPERAPHONE 
people hard of hearing can distinctly hear ordinary conversation 
at from 10 to 30 feet. Write for descriptive circular, price, etc. ^ 
Compound Micro-Auttiphone Co.Westfield, Mass.U.S.A. 




Used similar 
to Opera 
Glasses 




For Ladies' bicycles. Light, strong, ornamental. No 
more torn or greasy dresses. No troublesome lacing. 
No accidents. Infinitely superior to old style guards* 
Weight only 7 oz. Fits any wheel. Sent prepaid any* 
where in LJ. S. on receipt of $1.50. Circulars free. 
The Turner Brass Works, 163 Kinzie St., Chic; 



! HYPNOTISM 

J TAUGHT BY MAIL. 

Not Difficult. Spare 

liVlomettts Sufficient. 

I Not a natural gift; anyone 
lean use it. Latent powers 
[developed and the otherwise 
iimpossible accomplished. 
lOurs the most reliable se- 
jcrets ol the art, making afl 
Jsusceptible to this strange 
^influence. Induced by con- 
stact, orat a distance by mail 
[or telegraph. Control loved 

Jones and save them from 

x error. Habits, weaknesses and diseases cured. Noth- 
X ing aids all classes of every age, sex and condition, 
X in business and social iife more than this knowledge. 
^. Everything private. Established twenty years. Most 
X advanced and reliable methods. Valuable information 
X upon request. Address, Prof. L. H. ANDERSON, 
4. R.C.67. Masonic Temple, Chicago. 111. U.S. A 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦ ♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦ 




Taxidermists' Supplies 



When you get 
a good sped 
men of bird, 
fish, mammal 
etc., that you 
would like to 
get mounted, 
send it to us. We 
will do it right and 
also make the price 
right. 

Send five cents for 
new Taxidermists' 
Catalogue. 



Artificial 
Glass Eyes 



Taxidermist, 

217 Madison St., Chicago. 




We prepare 
and mount all 
specimens of 
natural histo- 
ry true to na- 
ture, in the 
best style of 
the Taxider- 
mist's art, at 
reasonable 
prices. 
We also keep a 
complete line of 

Oologists' 
and 

Entomo= 
logists' 
Supplies 



ft QUIET, RESTFUL, IDEAL RESORT 

for sportsmen, tourists, and their wives, with 
comfortable beds, nice table, good fishing and 
hunting in their season, is 

the Crow's nest, Sandy Bay, Ittoosebead Cake 

Rates reasonable, and only four miles from the 
railroad terminus. For particulars, write 

BIGNEY & ROWE, Proprietors, GREENVILLE, ME. 




AMMUNITION 

Try .22 Peters' Short Smokeless 

and New Victor Shells, 

Loaded with King's Smokeless 

FOR ACCURACY, VELOCITY, STRENGTH, 
'PENETRATION AND CLEANLINESS. 

INSIST ON YOUR 

DEALER 
SUPPLYING YOU 

THE 

PETERS 

CARTRIDGE 

CO. 

CINCINNATI. O. 

WOB. SAbB EVEBYWHEBE . 




RECREA TION. 



xlv 



SOME GOOD GUIDES. 

Following is a list of names and addresses 
of guides who have been recommended to 
me, by men who have employed them; to- 
gether with data as to the species of game 
and fish which these guides undertake to 
find for sportsmen. 

If anyone who may employ one of these 
guides finds him incompetent or unsatis- 
factory, I will be grateful if he will report 
the fact to me. 

ALASKA. 

William York, Juneau, moose, bear, deer, sheep, goats 

and small game. 

CALIFORNIA. 
Chris. Ringsin, Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, goats, 

water-fowl, and salt water fishing. 
John Meier, Sweetwater Lake, Dotsero P. O., 

Eagle Co., ditto 

John Broder, Visalia, trout, deer, bear, grouse, and 

quails. 
S. L. N. Ellis, Visalia. ditto 

COLORADO. 

J. M. Campbell, Buford, elk, bear, deer, antelope, trout 

and grouse. 

Chas. Smith, Buford, ditto 

Frank Allen, Dotsero, Eagle. Co., " 

Charles Allen, Dotsero, Eagle Co., " 

Wells and Patterson, Meeker, " 

R. W. McGee, Debeque, < " 

Lem Crandall, Debeque. ' fc 

Sam. T. Himes, New Castle, " 

Luke Wheeler, Pinkhampton, " 

Nathan Fisher, Gunnison, " 

W. H. Hubbard, Glenwood Springs, " 

W. L. Pattison, Buford, " 

]. E. Borah, Glenwood Springs, *' 

£d. L. Stockton, 527 nth St., Greeley, ** 

FLORIDA. 

C. L. Farnham, Avon Park, bear, deer, turkeys, quails, 

ducks, black bass, etc. 
Oliver Tinny, Ozona, Hillsboro Co., deer, bear, turkeys, 

quails, ducks and salt-water fishing. 

E. M. Reynolds, Fort Myers, ditto 

Wm. Webb, Osprey, Manatee Co., " 

Frank Guptill, Osprey, Manatee Co., " 

W. J. Meyer, Tarpon Springs, " 

Robt. E. Hammond, Key West, " 

Frank Carson, Ft. Meyers, « 4 

E. T. Robinson, Keuka, 4l 
T. C. Cato, Inverness, " 
J. L. Sandlin, Punta Gorda, " 
Oliver Archer, Clearwater, " 
L. W. Scroggins, Homeland, '• 
Capt. Jas. Argo, Oviedo, " 

F. J. Adams, Sanford, " 
C. B. Bailey, Winter Haven, " 
W. H. Steacy, Pt. Tampa City, " 
Wm. J. Lyon, Interlacken, •' 
L. L. Sutton, Sutherland, " 
M. B. Carson, Frost Proof, Polk Co., «' 
W. D. Isler, Eagle Lake, " 
George W. Hawthorn, Hawthorn, " 
C. H. Hill, Maitland, » 
J. E. Bowen, Laughman, , " 
Margan Bass, Kissimmee, " 
B. C. Lanier, Leesburg, «' 
John Hunter, Winter Park, •' 
H. Shipman, Haskell, " 
Robert James, Emporia, '« 
Alex. Brown, Martin. '« 
W. J. McCullough, Boardman, '* 
Frank Smith, St. James City " 
Jinks McCreary, Higly, " 
Baldwin Cassady, Lisbon, « 4 
W. H. Howell, Centre Hill, " 
Ed. Brown, Dunedin, M 

G. B. Lawson, Lake Maitland, n 
J. H. Maddox, Wauchula, " 
Will Montgomery, Arcadia, " 
T. E. Fielder, Calvinia, " 
W. F. Hays, Webster, « 



IDAHO. 

W. L. Winegar, Egin, Fremont Co., elk, bear, deer, an- 
telope, mountain sheep, trout and grouse. 

Geo. Winegar, St. Anthony, Fremont Co., ditto 

R. W. Rock, Lake, Fremont Co., *« 

Ed. Stailey, Lake, Fremont Co., " 

J. S. Sadorus, Sarilda, Fremont Co., " 
Geo. W. Rea, Orange, Fremont Co., 
Wm. Fraser, Beaver Canyon, 

IOWA. 

Geo. Jenkins, Spirit Lake, ducks, prairie chickens, black 

bass, etc. 

Wilbur Clark, Spirit Springs, " 

MAINE. 

Wm. S. Emery, Blakesley Camps, Eustis, moose, cari- 
bou, deer, trout, grouse. 

Algie Spearin, Moro, ditto 

Charley Condon, Moro, " 

Wm. Atkins, Oxbow, " 

Miles D. Arbow, Oxbow, " 

Frank Cram, Oxbow, " 

Nathan B. Moore, Bingham, " 

Charley Powers, Medway, " 

Charley Hale, Medway, " 

Walter Dacey, Medway, " 

Elliott Rich. Bethel, ' « 

John C. Lamb, Kineo, " 

John H. Quelty, Kineo, " 

Winn McKenney, Patten, " 

Mitchell Francis, Patten, " 

Royal E. Paine, Stratton, " 

Charles Hathaway, Medway, " 

Victor Scott, Millinockett, " 

C. O. Norton, Dover, •* 

Benjamin J. Woodaid, Dover, " 

Benjamin Woodard, Dover, " 

Col. N. D. Brown, Roach River House, " 

Alonzo Davenport, Shesuncook, " 

Ichabod Smith, Greenville, " 

Ernest Ham, Guilford, " 

Charlee Capen, Capens, " 

Ed. Masterman, Moosehead, " 

Marsh Carlton, Rangely, '« 

Freeman Tibbetts, Rangely, " 

Fred Reed, Medway, •« 

Dan Hale, Medway, " 

Will Meyer, Eustis, " 

Charles Haley, Eustis, " 

H. R. Horton, Eustis, " 

Abner McPhiters, Norcross, " 

Albert McPhiters, Norcross, «' 

Horace B. Cushman, Norcross, " 

Irving Hunt, Norcross, " 

Wm. O. Shaw, Dobsy Lake, Washington Co., " 

Ran. Day, Princeton, Washington Co., " 

Geo. C. Jones, Carritunk, " 

Geo. Douglass, Eustis, " 

David Quint, Eustis, *' 

Davis Moody, Stratton, «*, 

Gus Jones, Stratton, " 

Fred Viles, Stratton, " 

John Darling. Lowell, " 

Joe Francis, Old Town, " 

Sebat Shay, Old Town, " 

Louis Ketcham, Old Town, " 

Granville M. Grey, Old Town, " 

L. A. Orcutt, Ashland, " 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Recommended by Dr. Hitchcock, Cliftondall, grouse, 
squirrels, salt water fishing. 

MICHIGAN. 

Bony Markelty, Negaunee, deer, bear, grouse, trout, 

black bass, and muskalonge. 

Thos. Starr, Alpena, «« 

MINNESOTA. 

C. L. Porter, Glenwood, ducks, geese, prairie chickens, 

and black bass. 

E. L. Brown, Warren, ditto 

Jack Baldwin, Jackson, " 



xlvi 



RECREA TION. 



SOME GOOD GUIDES (Continued.) 

MONTANA. 

M. P. Dunham, Woodworth, elk, bear, deer, antelope, 

mountain sheep, trout and grouse. 

G. H. Heywood, Red Lodge, ditto 

Mr. William Jackson, Browning, Montana, " 

W. A. Hague, Fridley, " 
E. E. Van Dyke, Red Lodge, 

James Sheehan, Butte, " 

Vic. Smith, Anaconda, " 

James Blair, Magdalen, '* 

George Whitaker, Gardiner, " 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Philip Marden, Wolfboro Falls, black bass, grouse and 

quails. 

Frank Britton, Wolfboro Falls, ditto 
Blake Abbott, Wolfboro Falls, 
Ned Norton, Colebrook, moose, caribou and deer. 

John Bresette, Diamond Pond, ditto 

Henry Bresette, Diamond Pond, " 

NEW JERSEY. 

Billy Throckmorton, Mannahawkin, ducks, geese, brant, 

shore birds, grouse, salt-water fishing. 

Dory Hulse, Mannokoking, Ocean Co., ditto 

Ernest Worth, Bayville, Ocean Co., M 

James Emmans, Jr., Swartswood Lake, Swartswood, 

black bass, pickerel, quails and rabbits. 
Mr. Riker, Culver's Lake, Branchville, perch, black bass 

and pickerel. 

NEW YORK. 

Cal. Blanchard, Upper Jay, deer, grouse, rabbits, squir- 
rels and trout. 

Abe Rundle, Eldred, Sullivan Co., ditto 
A. W. Rundle, Eldred, 

Eugene Scrafford, Eighth Lake, Old Forge, 
Elias Hall, Paul Smith's, 

John McLaughlin, Paul Smith's, " 
Fred Martin, Paul Smith's, •* 
Ceylon Clarke, Piseco, Hamilton Co., M 
Joe White, Horseshoe Pond, Tupper Lake, Frank- 
lin Co., " 
Edson Brown, Spring Cove, Franklin Co., M 
William Boyea, Owl's Head, Franklin Co., " 
Will Simonds, Franklin Fall, Franklin Co., " 
Harry Freeman, Axton, Franklin Co., " 
Fred Reeves, Axton, Franklin Co., " 
Gean Clark, Axton, Franklin Co., " 
Geo. P. Finneean, Smithville Flats, Chenango Co., " 
L. C Pendell/Athol, " 
Geo. Goodsell, Old Forge, " 
Philip Christy, Old Forge, • 
Chris. Goodsell, Old Forge, care Rocky Point Inn, " 
Joe Ward, C. & A. branch, R. N. & O., Oswe- 

gatchie, " 

Martin Humes, Harrisville, " 

Myron Humes, Harrisville, *' 

Raymond Norton, Glendale, Lewis Co., " 
Andrew Watson, Glendale, Lewis Co., 

Frank Perkins, Greg, Lewis Co.. " 

Henry N. Mullen, Harrisville, Lewis Co., M 

Chris. Wagner, Beaver River, " 

Peter Back, Beaver River, " 

Nelson Foster, Saranac Lake, *' 

Rant Reynolds, Saranac Lake, " 

Chas. McKaffery, Saranac Inn, " 

Wess Wood, Saranac Inn, " 

Justin Farrington, Saranac Inn, " 

C. I. Stanton, Blue Mountain Lake, " 

C. L. Stanton, Blue Mountain Lake, " 

George W. Fuller, Blue Mountain Lake, " 

G. W; Fuller, Blue Mountain Lake, M 

Lawrence Sweeney, Lake Clear, " 

Ed. Oyis, Lake Clear, " 

Geo. Otis. Lake Clear, " 
Leonard Bunting, Greenfield, Ulster Co., grouse, wood- 
cock and trout. 

Thomas Flake, Cape Vincent, pickerel, muskalonge, 

black bass. 

Antoine Seymour. Cape Vincent, ditto 

Wilfred Dodge, Cape Vincent, li 

Ren Dodge, Cape Vincent, " 

Warren Aldrich, Greenwood Lake, black bass, trout, 

grouse, squirrels, rabbits, etc. 

Charles Lane, Good Ground, L. I., ditto 

Peter Post, Seaford, L. I., " 

Harry Rogers, Eastport, L. I., " 

Geo. Rolston, Lake Ronkon, Koma, L. I., " 

Ceo. M. Still, Lake Ronkon, Koma, L. I., " 



Willett Ellison, Freeport, L. I., black bass, trout, grouse, 
squirrels, rabbits, etc. 

W. C. Raynor, Freeport, L. I., ditto 

W. N. Ackerley, Patchogue, L. I., ducks, baybirds, salt- 
water fishing. 

Hugh Smith, Moriches, L. I., quails, woodcock and 
grouse. 

Dan Havens, Centre Moriches, L. I., ditto 

Hugh Smith, East Moriches, L. I., 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Fenner S. Jarvis, Haslin P. O., deer, bear, turkeys and 

quails. 
Robert Waterfield, Knotts Island, ditto 

Jas. Tooly, Belleport, 
W. C. Halsted, Currituck C. H., deer, turkeys, quails, 

ducks, salt-water fishing. 
Fred. Latham, Haslin, ditto 

OREGON. 

Wm. Ascher, West Fork, Douglass Co., deer, bear, elk, 

trout, grouse, ducks and geese. 
E. L. Howe, Creswell, Lane Co., ditto 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Leonard Champion. Prop'r Lehigh Valley Hotel, Mahoo- 
pany, Wyoming Co., bass, pickerel, salmon. 

VERMONT. 

E. Ward, Fair Haven, woodcock, grouse, black bass and 
trout. 

VIRGINIA. 

M. Corbel, Virginia Beach, geese, brant, ducks, shore 

birds, quails, salt-water fishing. 

Captain R. E. Miles, Machipongo, ditto 

C. A. Spencer, Buckingham, " 

James Daniel, Buckingham, " 

Fred Spencer, Buckingham, •' 

M. A. Barner, Clarksville, " 

^YASHINGTON. 
John S. Wood, Morton, Lewis Co., deer, grouse, trout, 
etc. 

WISCONSIN. 

T. R. Page, Bruce, deer, grouse, trout, black bass and 

muskalonge. 
Charles Johnson, care Williams, Salsich & Co., 

Star Lake, Vilas Co., ditto 

L. L. Thomas, State Line, " 

John Thomas, State Line, " 

Chas. French, Three Lakes, " 

M. E. Monsell, Star Lake, Vilas Co., " 

H. E. Soule, South Range, " 

Judd Blaisdell, Camp Franklin, Woodruff, " 

Alexander Gillies, Camp Franklin, Woodruff, " 

C. J. Coon, Camp Franklin, Woodruff, " 

WYOMING. 

Mark H. Warner, Ten Sleep, elk, bear, deer, mountain 

sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 

Milo Burke, Ten Sleep, ditto 

James Fullerton, Ten Sleep, " 

Nelson Yarnall, Dubois, " 

Geo. Y. Hayes, Dubois, '* 

S. A. Lawson, Laramie, ** 

R. C. Tregoning, Laramie, t4 

A. Pache, Laramie, '* 

N. E. Brown, Marquette, *■ 

H. D. DeKalb, Big Piney, " 

Ira Dodge, Cora, «• 

S. N. Leek, Jackson, ** 

W. P. Redmond, Jackson, '* 

Frank L. Peterson, Jackson, " 

O. F. Bike, Jackson, " 

F. E. White, Jackson, «' 
W. A. Hague, Pleasant Valley Hotel, via Mam- 
moth Hot Springs, " 

CANADA. 

Christopher Bowers, Shelburne, Nova Scotia, moose, bear, 

grouse, black bass and trout. 
E. Thompson, Hammond Plain, Nova Scotia, ditto 
John Bowers, Shelburne, Nova Scotia, '•' 

Billy McCoy, " " u . ] 

Frank Komondo, Desert or Maniwaki, P. Q., " 

Philamon Gashon, Three Lakes, P.Q., " 

Robert Elliott, Kennebec Road, Armstrong, 

County Beauce, P. Q., «' 

Geo. Gillard, Little Bay, Notre Dame Bay, Newfound* 

land, caribou, bear, ptarmigan, ducks and geese. 



RECREATION 










* 






the most elegant folding Camera in the market 



« * 




QUALITY 
. . • Can't be Beaten for =«= 



PRICE 



'J4 ><H 






Scid for Grculaj 



GUNDLACH OPTICAL CO. 

761, 762, 765 South Clinton St. .\ ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



* 
* 



* 




l?^*********************************^ 



xlviii 



RECREA T/OJV. 



A Practical Common Sense Camp Stove. 

In 6 Sizes. Patent applied for. 

The lightest, most com- 
pact, practical camp 
stove made; either with 
or without oven. Won't 
get out of shape, com- 
bination cast and sheet 
steel top, smooth body, 
heavy lining, telescopic 
pipe carried inside the 
stove. 

Burns largest wood, keeps fire longest of any 
stove made. For full particulars address 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, I1L 




A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

A Willsie Pocket Camera, Valued at $5.00 

As a premium for 5 yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation. This Camera makes a picture 2^x2% inches, 
and can be loaded with 24 cut films. You can get the 
5 subscriptions in one hour. 

Write This Office for Camera Catalogue. 




OPTICIANS. 

bi onion spre,N.Y. 

The Telescopes furnished 
by you to the Signal Corps, 
National Guard, State of 
New York, I find remark- 
able for definition and clear 
ness of objects at long dis 
tances. Yours, etc., 



HOMER W. HEDGE, 

1st Lieut, and 
Ass't Signal Officer, 





ffljS33iHC 



All the Standard Machines tor SALE or KENT at 
HALF manufacturers' prices. Full guarantee. 
Express charges prepaid if this mediant mentioned. 
Privilege of Examination. Write for catalogue. 

Typewriter Emporium, 80 8^Sfe. st - 



rp> o»<s5»cco<s3»oco<s3»oeo<s3» oco<^s»oco«ss»cco«^3»o»< 



G. CRAMER 

DRY PLATE 
I WORKS 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

jj Full descriptive catalogue mailed 
I to any address on application 



Dixon's Graphitoleo 

Lubricates not only the chain and sprockets, but 
also the pins in the links of the chain, 

which stick Graphite cannot do and is not intended 
to do. For gun locks, for copying presses, and 
for office chairs it is unequaled. If your dealer 
does not keep it, mention Recreation, and send , 
15 cents for sample. 

JOS, DIXON CRUCIBLE CO,, Jersey City, N. J. 



WANTED.— LIVE ELK, MOOSE, CARIBOU, BLACK- 
tail deer, wild turkey, European roebucks, fallow deer, 
etc., for Litchfield Park, Adirondacks. Address, with par- 
ticulars, EDWARD H. LITCHFIELD, 59 Wall Street, New 
York. 



EARLY TROUTING. 

In April, last, Mr. P and I went on 

a fishing trip to Spragueville, Munroe Co., 
Pa. We stayed at Stites Mountain house, 
which is the only hotel within 7 miles of 
the place. 

There are 2 beautiful streams, one run- 
ning at the front and the other at the back 
of the hotel. 

I jointed my rod and was soon on the 
banks of an deep pool which is within 
200 feet of the hotel. After a few casts and 
many changes of flies I gave up and was 
soon back in the comfortable steam heated 
sitting room. 

For the first 2 days the weather was very 
cold, the thermometer touching 30 degrees, 
and the water froze to our leaders. 

After waiting a day for the water to warm 
a little, we drove up the back stream 3 
miles and then fished down. The water 
was too high to fish comfortably, and not 
knowing the stream and pools we caught 
only a few trout. 

During our stay Mr. P caught many 

large fish, some weighing 1 pound each. 

I am highly pleased with Recreation 
and think it the best sportsmen's magazine 
published. J. L. P., New York City. 



The Premo A. came to hand on the 21st. 
I have not had time to try it yet, but the 
reputation of the Rochester Optical Com- 
pany is a guarantee that it will be O. K. 
Many thanks for your prompt and courte- 
ous treatment in this matter. I have a great 
deal of pleasure in securing this club, and 
consider myself doubly paid. 

C. E. Tucker, Hannibal, Mo. 



I have been so busy I neglected to an- 
nounce the arrival of the Premo camera. I 
have tried it, and to say I am pleased would 
be a tame way of expressing my feelings. I 
can only say, as hundreds of others say, 
"How can you do it?" Recreation 
alone is worth more than you ask for it. 
It is clean, bright, and interesting, inside 
and out. 

Z. R. Jacoby, Amsterdam, N. Y. 



RECREA TION. 



xhx 



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XI- 






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Have you ^> 

ever noticed the numerous 
/f testimonials of the 

Bristol Steel Rod 

That appear each month in the reading: col- \\ 

umns of RECREATION ? IV 

Well, these come from disinterested people ; 

from people who are 

Practical Anglers and who are 

iiiiB Using Our Rods.// 
ah who use BRISTOL RODS 

Speak in the most glowing terms of them. // 
Try one and you will do likewise. 

Send for a catalogue. It tells about them. 

THE HORTON MFG. CO. S. 

•?>^ BRISTOL, CONN, 



RECREATION. 



New Ithaca^ Guns 



Self compensating, 
taking up wear 
at every point 



P^ 



Bored 

FOR BLACK AND 
NITRO POWDERS 





Price but a little more than one-half that of any other good gun, and 
warranted in the most positive terms, shooting included 



ITHACA GUN COMPANY, ITHACA, N. Y. 



Send for circular 

Mention Recreation 



Manufacturers of fine Hammer 
and Hammerless Guns 



^J^J^w 



GOATS AND BEARS. 

The ist of September last, Capt. W. S. 
Turner, with Vic Smth as guide, and me as 
chief of the culinary department, started 
on a trip for big game. We made our home 
camp about 35 miles from the railroad. The 
3d day a herd of elk was seen. Vic acted as 
reserve, in case the Captain should miss; 
but it was unnecessary, for 2 bulls were 
killed without Vic's help. 

There were a number of moose near 
camp; their tracks being seen every morn- 
ing, in the park where the horses grazed. 
I kept the camp supplied with grouse and 
fish, while the Captain provided big game. 

After 2 successful weeks, we moved about 
20 miles, to the Goat hills. Camp was 
pitched at a beautiful mountain lake. The 
Captain spread his blankets and lay down 
to rest, while Vic and I sprang the tents 
and cut fir boughs for our bed. The Cap- 
tain scanned the hills with a field-glass 
a few seconds, then exclaimed: " See the 
goats! " Sure enough, there were 21 white 
goats in sight, not a mile away. It was a 
beautiful sight. After supper, we lounged 
around, watching the animals. They paid 
no attention to us. 

The next morning, the big-game hunt- 
ers started for the goats, which were feed- 
ing along the base of the mountain. They 
got within 40 yards of the game, then the 
Captain turned loose his Winchester 44, 
and 4 handsome billies surrendered uncon- 



ditionally. Vic called a halt on the shoot- 
ing, reminding him that the law allowed 
him to kill but 8 goats; and that he had 
better reserve his shots a few days. We 
camped there 2 weeks, seeing goats from 
camp every day. 

The Captain easily killed all the law al- 
lowed, and coul.d have killed 50 more. 
Their hides were good, the hair being near- 
ly 6 inches long. 

Vic went down to the river after mail, 
one day, and on his return killed a buck 
antelope. He discovered signs of a silver- 
tip, around the remains of a goat carcass, 
about 2 miles from camp. So next day the 
hunters laid for the bear, which put in an 
appearance about 4 in the afternoon. The 
Captain knocked her over, though it took 
6 bullets to do it. There was no prouder 
man in the mountains that day than our 
military friend. Vic calmly looked on dur- 
ing the shooting. 

We had a 50 pound balance scale in 
camp, and with this I accompanied the 
others, next morning, to assist in cutting 
the bear into chunks small enough to 
weigh. Her weight was exactly 651 pounds. 
The fat on her back was 4 inches thick. 

Two days later we broke camp, having 
been out a month. Captain Turner, who 
has been on many hunting trips, pro- 
nounced this the most successful one he 
ever had. He says Vic Smith is the Prince 
of guides. 

Ben Osborne, Big Hole Basin, Mont. 



RECREATION. 



li 



For nearly 50 Years the name 



a 



naocnport" 




has been identified with 
the manufacture of 




nODEL 1894. 

AUTOMATIC EJECTOR 

Our present line is complete and varied and shows the result of years of experience. 

For catalogues and information address 

THE W. H. DAVENPORT FIRE ARMS CO. 

NORWICH, CONN., U. S. A. 



Mention '* kecreation " 



Ejector Guns 
no longer a 
luxury 




TENS OF THOUSANDS IN USE 

Send for Catalogue 

LEFEVER ARMS CO. 

(Mention Recreation.) 



Good news for Sportsmen 

Lefever Automatic Ejector Guns at a price 
within the reach of every sportsman. 

OUR NEW EJECTOR nOVEHENT 

Has only two pieces: One in the 
Hammer, One in 
the Frame. 

We have decided to meet 
the demand for medium 
price Ejectors, and are now 
H prepared to accept orders 
for all grades of our hana- 
merless guns fitted with 
Ejectors. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 




Date, 1897. 

Q. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Hanager of RECREATION, 19 West 24th St., New York: 
Herewith find One Dollar, for which please send me RECREATION 
for one year beginning with number. 



Name, 



Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT, AND SEND IN. 



lii 



RECREATION. 



A FINE PERFORMANCE 

GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP, 1897 




Jst— Hon. T. A. MARSHALL, 

Keithsburgf, 111., 25 kills straight* 

26— Dr. W- F. CARVER, Chicago, 
24 straight, and 25th killed but 
carried out of bounds by wind* 

2d— Dr. J. L. WILLIAMSON, 24 
ex. 25. 



All 

Using 

Cashmore 

Guns 



FIRST AND TWO SECONDS OUT OF 136 COMPETITORS 

TRAP GUN BUILDING A SPECIALTY 
new list free Address, WM. CASHMORE, Gunmaker 

Telegram, "Extractor, Birmingham" BIRMINGHAM, ENG. 




FOR FIELD OR FOR TRAP, 
FOR POT HUNTING OR FUN, 
NO SPORTSMAN IS EQUIPPED 
WITHOUT A SYRACUSE GUN 



"MORE TRUTH 
THAN POETRY" 




We do not say that SYRACUSE HAMMERLESS GUNS 

"Are as Good" as any gun in the market* 




Their simplicity of construction and superiority of finish stamp them u BETTER" for 
practical f ali-round work than any gun in the market. The "old, old story" but, 
nevertheless, substantiated by every man who ever drew a Syracuse to his shoulder. 






SYRACUSE ARMS CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y., U. & A. 






RECREA TION. 



n 11 



Forehand Arms Co/s 



EJECTOR AND NON-EJECTOR 

HAMMERLESS DOUBLE GUN 




LATEST MODEL 



READ WHAT MEN 
SAY OF THE 
FOREHAND, WHO 
ARE USING IT. 



Warren, III. 

The Forehand Hammerless Gun you sent me, for 35 
subscriptions, has arrived. I am delighted with it, and 
shall recommend it highly. It is a good, close-shooting 
gun, simple in action, and of fine workmanship. I made 
two long shots with it yesterday at grouse in heavy brush, 
killing both birds at distances of forty to forty-five yards. 
I would not wish for a better gun than the Forehand for 
trap shooting. Dr . a . C. Czibulka. 



Moline, III. 
I have received from the Forehand Arms Co., of 
Worcester, Mass., the double-barreled, hammerless, breech- 
loading shot-gun as a premium for 35 subscriptions, and 
it is a beauty. It is light, strong, handsome, and shoots as 
well as any gun I know of. Got four squirrels and a 
rabbit yesterday — all the game I saw — and one shot at each 
was enough. I compared my gun with an $85.00 gun to- 
day, of another make, and mine gained in value greatly, 
in my estimation. w B Kent> 



WE GET THOUSANDS 
OF SUCH 
TESTIMONIALS- 
ALL UNSOLICITED 



WHAT EVERYONE SAYS MUST BE SO 



We challenge competition in Beauty, Workmanship, Simpli- 
city of Mechanism, Shooting Qualities and Price. We target 
all our guns with nitro powder. For Catalogue, address 

FOREHAND ARMS CO., WORCESTER, MASS. 



liv 



RECREA TION. 



DOG HAMPERS 

FOR SHIPPING DOGS OR CATS BY RAIL 

5 SIZES, $6.00 TO $15.00 

(RATTAN OR WICKER) 



Order through your Dealer and send for catalogue to 

SPRATTS PATENT LIMITED 
\ 245 EAST 56th STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



DOC AND POULTRY 
SUPPLIES 



THE OLD 
RELIABLE 

Has stood the test 
of over 30 years 



Parker Gun 



Built on Honor" 



HAS 

NO EQUAL 

Simplicity and dura- 
bility combined with 
handsome finish and 

perfect shooting 

qualities 




Experience and ability have placed "The Parker" in an 
enviable and well deserved position as the best gun in the 
world. Made by the oldest shot gun manufacturers in America. 
Nearly 100,000 in use. 



$£ND FOR CATALOGUE 



New York Salesrooms 

96 Chambers Street 



PARKER BROS., Meriden, Conn. 



RECREA TION. 



lv 



Decorations for Sportsmen's Dens 



tapestry 
Paintings 



2000 



Tapestry Paintings to choose 
from. 38 artists employed, 
including gold medalists of the 
Paris Salon. 



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r-, . 




B^^J^feOTlra™! 



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TAPESTRY MATERIALS 

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American tapestry and 
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286 Fifth Avenue, New York 

Near 30th Street 



Ivi RECREA TION. 



C Spend the Summer at ... . J 

A On the Crest of the Alleghanies * 

A 3,000 Feet Above Tide-Water * 

4 Season Opens June 21, 1897 \ 

d ? 

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L and directly upon the main line of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 

f has the advantage of its splendid vestibuled express train service, both east I 

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L Alt Baltimore & Ohio trains stop at Deer Park, during the season. There y 

h r 

7 are also a number of furnished cottages with facilities for housekeeping, i 

5 The houses and grounds are supplied with absolutely pure 'water, (J 

t piped from the celebrated "Boiling Spring, " and are lighted by electricity, y 

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a Turkish and Russian baths and large swimming pools are provided for i 

J ladies and gentlemen, and suitable grounds for lawn tennis. There are H 

L bowling alleys and billiard rooms ; fine riding and driving horses, carriages, 3 

T mountain wagons, tally-ho coaches, etc., are kept for hire; in short, all <t 

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RECREA TION. 



lvii 




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By getting 75 subscriptions for 

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you can get these in 2 days, 

I can give you the names of 20 
people who did this in J 896, and 
who now have their wheels. 

Write for particulars* 

RECREATION 

19 West 24th Street 

New York 




Sargenfs 



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Book Cases 





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A brain worker's best 
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HEW YORE. 



BOOKS 



By 



C. O. SHIELDS 

(coquina) 



THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA 

Its Habits, Habitat, Haunts and Characteristics. 
How, When and Where to Hunt it. 8vo, 600 
pages, 80 illustrations. Cloth, $350 ; Half Mor- 
occo, $5.00; Full Morocco, $6. 50. 

CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES 

A Narrative of Travel, Exploration, Amateur 
Photography, Hunting and Fishing, with Special 
Chapters on Hunting the Grizzly Bear, the Buf- 
falo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and 
Deer ; also on T routing in the Rocky Mountains ; 
on a Montana Roundup ; Life Among the Cow- 
boys, etc. i2mo, 300 pages, 75 illustrations. Cloth, 
$2 ; Half Morocco, $3. 

AMERICAN GAME FISHES 

How, When and Where to Angle for them. 8vo, 
400 pages, 50 illustrations. Cloth, $2.50; Half Mor- 
occo, $4. 

HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST 

(Rustlings in the Rockies) 
Hunting and Fishing Sketches by Mountain and 
Stream. i2tno, cloth. Over 300 pages. Illustrated. 
Price, 75 cents. 

THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG 

The Origin, Development, Special Characteristics, 
Utility', Breeding, Training, Diseases and Kennel 
Management of all Breeds of Dogs. 8vo, 650 pages, 
100 illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5 ; 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 

CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS 

A Manual of Instruction for Young and Old Sports- 
men. i2mo, 200 pages, 30 illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 

THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE 

History of General Gibbon's Engagement with 
the Nez Perce Indians in the Big Hole Basin, Mon- 
tana, August 9, 1877. i2mo, 150 pages. Profusely 
illustrated. Cloth, $1. 
These books will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt 

of price, by the author. 

G. O. SHIELDS 

19 West 24th St., New York 



lviii 



RECREATION. 




?tfefe 



tunitics 



These goods are all new, and 
will be shipped direct from factory. 
Prices named are those at which 
manufacturers and dealers usually 
sell. Here is a good chance to get 

A BOOK 
A GUN 
A CAMERA 
A TYPEWRITER 
A BICYCLE 

FREE OF COST^e^t^ 

Subscriptions need not all be 
sent at once. They can be sent in 
installments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. When the 
required number is obtained the 
premium earned will be shipped. 



u 



Recreation 



tt 



19 West 24th Street 
New York 



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To any person sending me 

TWO yearly subscriptions to Recreation at 
$i each, I will send a copy of Hunting in 
the Great West, paper. 

THREE subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
The Battle of the Big Hole, cloth. 

FOUR subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
Camping and Camping Outfits, cloth. 

FIVE subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
Cruising in the Cascades, cloth ; or a Will- 
sie Pocket Camera, valued at $5. It makes 
a picture 2ix2f inches and can be loaded 
with 24 cut films. 

SIX subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
American Game Fishes, cloth. 

SEVEN subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Big Game of Nortli America, or of 
The American. Book of the Dog, cloth. 

EIGHT subscriptions at $1 each, a Pocket 
Kodak, made by the Eastman Kodak Co., 
and valued at $5. 

TEN subscriptions at $1 each, a single-shot 
Davenport Rifle ; or a Bristol Steel Fish- 
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worth $10. 

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karat Gold Hunting-case Watch, with 
Elgin Movement, worth $20 ; or a Marlin 
Repeating Rifle, listed at $20 ; or an Im- 
proved Night-hawk Hand Camera, made 
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at $25 ; or a No. 4 Bullseye Camera, made 
by the Eastman Kodak Co., and worth 
$12 ; or a Premo B Camera, worth $16. 

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Bullet Camera, made by the Eastman 
Kodak Co., and worth $18. 

THIRTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
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Hammerless Breech-loading Shot-gun, 
worth $35. 

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FIFTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Marlin 
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SEVENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
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a fine Lefever Hammerless Gun, worth 
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plates, made by the Manhattan Optical 
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RECREA TION. 



lix 



"THE LITTLE FINGER DOES IT" 

The Fisherman's Automatic Reel 



THE 

UTOMATIC 





the Automatic Reel 



F^irst — It will wind up the 
line a hundred times as 
fast as any other reel in 
the world. 

Second — It will wind up 
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F"01tr til — It will save 
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from being broken by 
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Sixtll — The reel is ma- 
nipulated entirely by the 
hand that holds the rod. 

Seventh — It enables the 
angler and makes it de- 
sirable to use lighter tips. 



ND 



=L CATALOGUE 



lx 



RECREA TION. 



The Big Game 

North America 




ITS HABITS, HABITAT, HAUNTS, AND CHARACTERISTICS 
HOW, WHEN, AND WHERE TO HUNT IT 

A Book for the Sportsman and the Naturalist 



EDITED BY 



G. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 



AUTHOR OF " CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," "HUNTING IN THE GREAT 
WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE," "CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS," ETC. 



8vo, 600 Pages, 80 Illustrations. 

Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Calf, $5*00; Full Morocco, $6.50. 



CONTENTS 



Introduction. By the Honorable John Dean Caton, 

author of " The Antelope and Deer of America," etc. 
Moose Hunting in the Rocky Mountains. Newton 

Hibbs (" Roxey Newton"). 
Elk Hunting in the Olympic Mountains. W. A. Perry 

(" Sillalicum "). 
The Wapiti (Poem). By "Wah-bah-mi-mi." 
The Caribou. By William P. Lett ("Algonquin") 

and Dr. R. B. Cantrell. 
The Mule Deer. Rev. Joshua Cooke (" Boone"). 
The Mule Deer of Southern California. T. S. Van 

Dyke, author of " The Still Hunter," etc. 
The Columbia Black-tail Deer. Thomas G. Farrell. 
The Virginia Deer. Walter M. Wolfe (" Shoshone "). 
A Deer Hunt (Poem). " Wah-bah-mi-mi." 
Hunting the Grizzly Bear. Rev. Dr. W. S. Rainsford. 
The Polar Bear. Sergt. Francis Long, of the Greely 

Arctic Expedition, and George S. McTavish, of the 

Hudson Bay Company. 
A Polar Bear Hunt. 

The Black Bear. Col. Geo. D. Alexander. 
The Buffalo. Orin Belknap (" Uncle Fuller "). 



H. Bierdebick, of the Greely 
Arthur W- du Bray 



The Musk Ox. Sergt. 
Arctic Expedition. 

Still-hunting the Antelope. 
(" Gaucho "). 

Coursing the Antelope. M. E. Allison. 

The Death of Venus (Poem). Wm. P. Lett. 

The Rocky Mountain Goat. 

The Rocky Mountain Sheep, 
na "). 

The Peccary. A. G. Requa. 

The Cougar, or Mountain Lion, 
licum "). 

The Lynx. J. C Nattrass. 

The Wild Cat. Daniel Arrowsmith (" Sangamon "). 

The Wolf. Wm. P. Lett. 

The Wolverine. C. A. Cooper (" Sibyllene"). 

Coon Hunting in Southern Illinois. Daniel Arrow- 
smith (" Sangamon "). 

Fox Hunting in Virginia. Dr. M. G. Ellzey. 

Alligator Shooting in Florida. Cyrus W. Butler. 

The Ethics of Field Sports. Wm. B. Leffingwell. 



John Fannin. 
G. O. Shields ("Coqui- 



W. A. Perry (" Silla- 



The Hon. John Dean Caton, the eminent naturalist and jurist, author of "The Antelope and Deer of 
America," etc., says of this work : 

" Altogether, there is given here such a study of the natural history of our game quadrupeds, and of the 
thrilling incidents encountered in hunting them, as has never before been offered to the reading world. Each 
chapter in this book is in itself a complete work, and the book, as a whole, is a most valuable library. 

" Any one of the names on Mr. Shields' list of contributors should insure the sale of an entire edition of 
his book, and when we multiply this possibility by twenty-sjx, the whole number of names on his title-page, 
the result obtained indicates the magnitude of the success that should, and that we hope will, crown his labors 
and those of his collaborateurs." 

"This sumptuous volume, profusely and elegantly illustrated, written by a score or more of sportsmen, is a 
very captivating book. No single writer could have had all the experiences here narrated. The descriptions 
and incidents cover every variety of large game on the continent. ***** The stories are as excellent ir 
their variety as in their quality. There are no dull chapters in the book. In fact, it may be said it is the fines', 
collection of hunting stories ever published." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

" This is one of the best and most valuable of the books as yet written or edited by Mr. Shields. It com- 
prises a collection of intelligently written monographs on all the various kinds of big game to be found in 
North America, from the grizzly to the polar bear, and from the Virginia deer to the Rocky Mountain goat. 
Each writer speaks from his own experience, tells what he has done and seen, and recounts the often thrilling 
incidents he has met with in hunting. All the contributors to the volume are well-known writers on field sports 
and hunting, and each one writes of a species of game he has studied for years in the field, on the mountain, or 
in the forest." 

" The paper on the Rocky Mountain sheep is by the Editor, and is a fine account of the wildest, wariest, 
and most difficult animal to hunt on the continent. Mr. Shields is a most enthusiastic sportsman, and more- 
over, wields the pen of a ready writer, as indeed all these sportsmen do, so that one follows him in his adven- 
tures with almost breathless interest. 

" From beginning to end and in every chapter this book is positively fascinating." — Chicago Herald. 



This book will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price by the editor. 

G. O. SHIELDS, J 9 West 24th Street, New York 
Also given as a Premium for 7 Subscriptions to Recreation 



ANOTHER WINNER $ 

Made by Mr. Walter Winans, at the North London Rifle Club, London, England, 9 shots 

at 30 yards, target actual size, Smith & Wesson 45 calibre revolver and U. M. C. cartridges. 

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NEW YORK AGENTS 

C. M. MOSEMAN & BRO. 
126-128 CHAMBERS ST. 



Trow Directory, Printing and Bookbinding Company. 



^ 



VOLUME VII. 
NUMBER 2 



AUGUST, 1897 



$1.00 A Yl Al< 
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Hon. Thomas Marshall 




Mayor of Keithsburg, 111. 
WINNER OF 

Grand 

American 

handicap 

March 24, 1897 



Used DU PONT 
SMOKELESS POWDER 



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Eh raii^E^i^i^igEugE^ 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1896, by G. O. Shields 

A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



$1.00 a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



19 West 24TH Street, 

New York. 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 



" He had White's Right Arm in his Capacious Mouth " — Frontispiece. Bert Cassidy 

A Bad Grizzly George W. Kellogg 

The Confessions of Lynx Canadensis. Illustrated W. E. Carlin 

" Oh Mother, Take the Wheel Away " Old Song 

Our Alaskan Exploring Expedition. Up the Stickeen. Illustrated .... .A. J. Stone 

"Pete" Illustrated H. A. Horton 

Record Buffalo Heads. Illustrated W. T. H. 

My Wife's Moose. Illustrated W. E. Bemis 

In the Gaulies. Illustrated D. C. Braden 

A Reminiscence of Buffalo Days. Illustrated Capt. H. Romeyn, U.S.A. 

A Salt Water Breeze. Illustrated George G. Cantwell 

Old Fort Smith Mat. E. R. P. Shurly, U.S.A. 

In the Land of the Shag F.J. Church 

Fishing in the Mountains of Maryland L. L. Litman 

Camped in the Canyon. (Poem) James Hanks 

A Montana Dream. (Poem) John V. Cole 



From the Game Fields . 

Fish and Fishing 

Guns and Ammunition . 

Natural History 

Editor's Corner 



127 Bicycling 

140 Book Notices 

145 Puzzle Corner 

151 Amateur Photography. . . 

156 Publisher's Department, 



Page 

87 
89 
93 
94 
105 
107 
109 
116 
117 
119 
121 
122 
124 
126 
158 
157 
160 
161 
162 
166 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, il 





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RECREA TION. 



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RECREA TION. 



if .1 ""1 


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There is. 



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ALONG THE 



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The Delaware River 



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2\ Cortlandt St., New York 





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Pishing on the Picturesque Erie 



R EC RE A TION. 



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E.. R. DURKE.E, & GO., 129 Water Street, New York 




CYCLOMETER 



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WATER PROOF, 
POSITIVELY ACCURATE. 




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Weight, I oz. 

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ft GREAT OFFER °y 

GERMANIA WINE 
CELLARS 

HAMMONDSPORT and 
RHEIMS, N. Y. 

In order to introduce our goods we 
make the following offer, good for the 
next thirty days only. Upon receipt of 
$5.00 we will send to any sportsman or 
reader of RECREATION one case of our 
goods containing eleven bottles of wine 
and one bottle of our extra fine ilouble- 
distilled Grape Brandy, all first class 
and put up in elegant style, assorted, as 
follows : 

1 Quart Bottle Grand Imperial 
Sec Champagne 

1 Quart Bottle Delaware 



Brandy 



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Tokay 

Sweet Catawba 

Sherry 

Elvira 

Niagara 

Angelica 

Port 

Sweet Isabella 

Imperial Grape 



This offer is made mainly 
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our fine double-distilled 
(J rape Brandy, without 
which no Sportsman or 
Hunter should start on an 
expedition, as it is very 
necessary where such exer- 
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goods is offered at about 
one-half its actual cost and 
it will please us if our 
friends and patrons will 
take advantage of this and 
help us introduceour goods. 



Vlll 



RECREA TION. 



Decorations for Sportsmen's Dens 



Capestry 
Painting 



2000 



Tapestry Paintings to choose 
from. 38 artists employed, 
including gold medalists of the 
Paris Salon. 




mall Papers 
Given Away 

Fine Satin, French or Leather 
Papers, 10 cents per roll ; for- 
mer price. $1.50. Have drapery 
to match. State color and 
for what rooms. Will send 
sample book if you will pay 
expressage. 



SPECIAL DRAPERIES 

to match. Venetian, Roman, Dresden, Marie 
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TAPESTRY MATERIALS 

We manufacture tapestry materials. Superior 
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samples, 10 cents. Send $1.50 for trial order, 
for 2 yards of 50-inch, No. 6 goods worth 
$3.00. 

DECORATIONS 

Write for color schemes, designs, estimates. 
Artists sent to all parts of the world to do every 
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Six 2-hour tapestry painting, china or minia- 
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instructions by mail, $1.00. Tapestry paintings 
rented ; full size drawings, paints, brushes, 
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are such advantages offered pupils. New cat- 
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for complete instructions in tapestry paint- 
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A trip to the Interior World. " Jules Verne in 
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44 illustrations, price $2. 00, postage prepaid. 
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The art book of the century. 200 royal quarto 
pages. 50 superb full-page illustrations (11 
colored) of modern home interiors. Send 
$2.00 for this $50.00 art book. 



JOHN F. DOUTHITT 



American Capestry and 
Decorative Company 



286 Fifth Avenue, New York 

Near 30th Street 



KECKEA TION. 



IX 



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RECREA TION. 



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RECREATION. xi 



SINCE NOVEMBER, 1896 

We have been doing our best to keep up with the increas- 
demand for Gramophones :::::: 
Our manufacturing facilities have been steadily ex- 
tended ; work has been carried on night and day ; much 
foreign business has been declined; yet (on July 7th) we 
find ourselves with hundreds of orders unfilled* : % 

But one conclusion can be drawn from this unprecedented de- 
mand: the Gramophone is without question the most popular, as 
it is the simplest and most wonderful, talking machine* li is the 
only sound reproducing instrument in the world that gives such 
results as were witnessed in the Metropolitan Opera House test, 
referred to in the following unsolicited letter. 



OFFICES OF 

ABBEY, SCHOEFFEL & GRAU, Ltd. 

Metropolitan Opera House 
Corner 39TH Street and 7TH Avenue 

new york April 24, 1897. 

National Gramophone Company, 

874 Broadway. New York, N. Y. 
Gentlemen : — Enclosed please find my check for $31.00 to pay for 
Gramophone and records. 

By the way, I was very much interested in a trial of the Gramo- 
phone in the Metropolitan Opera House a few days ago. I had no idea 
that so small an instrument, with a horn only about twelve inches long, 
could fill every nook and corner of the largest auditorium in New York 
City. Every word seemed to be distinct, and the rendering of the selec- 
tions nothing short of marvelous. 

I congratulate you upon the possession of such a wonderful in- 
strument. 

Yours very truly, 

John B. Schoeffel, 
Managing Director Abbey, Schoeffel & Grau 



Arrangements have novj been completed vohereby it is believed that after 
July 25th all orders can be promptly filled* Great improvements have been 
made in quality and volume of tone since the above letter vuas written, and 
vjhat vjas a marvelous reproduction before, is even more so novo* All orders 
for style No* 25, spring motor, vjill be filled vjith our nevj improved machine, 
vjith the nevj exhibition sound box* Nevj Catalog ready — by request* 

National Gramophone Co*, 874 Broadvuay, Nevj York* 



Xll 



RECREA TIOJV. 



Genuine Siberian Moose Huntin & Golf or 

ABSOLUTELY WATER-PROOF TO THE TOP. Walking ShOCS 

NOTHING SO GOOD EVER PRODUCED BEFORE AT ANY PRICE. 

I This is a special line of Boots and Shoes in every way. Special water-proof 

leather, special anhydrous soles, special lasts of new design, special stitching, special 
$ lining, in fact, every point of shoe worth 

has been studied to give each special value. 
The result is a shoe as strong as steel, 

yet, pliable and soft as kid, graceful to 

the eye and easy on the foot, and will 

outwear any two ordinary shoes. 

The leather is the famous Siberian 
Moose. Costs more than any other, 
and guaranteed water-proof. 

The soles are of the best anhydrous oak 
stock, made water-proof by patented 
process. 

The Stitching will not rip. The bottoms 
are hand-sewed with Barbour's extra 
heavy water-proof flax. The uppers 
are stitched and then double-stitched 
with pure silk. 

Bellows tongues of the best Moose stock 
are used, making the shoes water- 
proof to the top. 

The linings are of finest russet calf-skin, 
adding warmth and strength. 

English Backstays, extra heavy eye- 
lets, " Bull Dog" toes, Pratt Fast- 
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shoe point will be found in them. 
Price to all alike, $7.50 net. 

We also make a short boot, 12 inches high, 

at $8.50; a knee boot, "Hunters Style," 

lacing up the front, at $10.00, and a 

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the same good points as the shoes. 

We expect a large out-of-town trade, 

and to quickly introduce this line v/e 

will, on the first 100 pairs, prepay 

expressage to any part of the 

United States or Canada, as the 

orders are received. 

HENRY C. 



3 

1 




SQUIRES & SON 

20 Cortlandt 
Street 

New York 



L-4R 



The cut is a photograph of our tan walking shoe after having been worn two months. 



R EC RE A TION. 



x 1 1 1 




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Fleeced Underwear 



DON'T SHRINK NO IMITATION 

A decided advance over all other undergarments. 
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All moisture ( -whether from perspiration or sudden 
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For sale by leading Dry-Goods, Furnishing, and 
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THOS. A. PEARCE & CO., Manufacturers 
PHILADELPHIA 

WM. EWART & SON, Ltd. 

(Underwear Dep't, J. B. Seward, Mgr.), 
115 and 117 Franklin Street, New York 
Sole Agents for United States 



A GEM 
AMONG JEWELS 

In appearance a jewel may be perfect — in reality, 

imperfect. It is so with a bicycle, raint covers a multitude 

of sins, but will not insure safety against flaws or imperfections. 



^V* PLATE <J 



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on a Howard Cycle is a guarantee of Howard 
perfection, backed by an old and honorable firm 

THE HOWARD CYCLE $ \ A A 

Men's and Women's Models \ \J \J 



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$ 150 



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The E. Howard Watch & Clock Co., 383 Washington St., Boston. 41 Maiden Lane, New York 



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xv 




FOR THE 

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The grandest combination known for curing a bad skin and protecting a 
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Woodbury's Facial Cream 

being absolutely free from grease or oil of any nature can be used freely 
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Woodbury's Facial Soap 

contains the best Antiseptic known to Medical Science and will allay any 
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JOHN H. WOODBURY, Dermatological Institute 

Offices for the Cure of Skin and Nervous Diseases and the Removal of Facial Blemishes: 
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Address all letters to 127 West 42d Street, New York. 

A sample of either Woodbury's Facial Soap or Facial Cream, with 132-page illustrated Beauty 
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xvi RECREATION. 



® & 

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sn m 

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HE HAD WHITE'S RIGHT ARM IN HIS CAPACIOUS MOUTH. 



Volume VII. 



RECREATION. 

AUGUST, 1897. 

G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



Number 2. 



A BAD GRIZZLY. 



GEORGE W. KELLOGG. 



In 1850 there were scattered over 
the mountains of California adventur- 
ers from everywhere, who had come 
to dig for gold, of which there had 
been so many wonderful stories. 
Careless of danger, in their persistent 
hunt for the precious metal, some 
were left, mangled by wild animals; 
some were scalped by hostile Indians 
and some were stricken by the moun- 
tain fever, and were never heard of 
more. But, regardless of the dangers 
and privations, many penetrated the 
wilds of the mountains, exploring 
every gulch and ravine, climbing hills, 
examining streams and prospecting 
for gold everywhere. Where all was 
so wild and desolate then, towns are 
now built up, railroads are winding 
through, and the wild experiences of 
45 years ago are almost forgotten. In 
those days a person was seldom 
know r n by his true name, but some 
trifling incident would fix a nickname 
to him that he would carry ever after. 

During the autumn of 1850 I was 
with a companion called " Mountain 
Joe," a hardy, resolute fellow, and we 
prospected along up the Cosmos, and 
afterward followed the Mokehoma 
river to its head, probably then as 
wild a place as man ever saw. Going 
still farther North we passed over 
what is now called Grizzly Flats. We 
finally came down and located at a 
place called Cold Spring, on Weber 
creek, 5 miles from Coloma, where 
gold was first discovered. 

During our prospecting tour we 



located some rich finds of gold, but in 
some cases we could find no way to 
bring in provisions, and in others the 
hostile Indians kept on our trail, and 
we had no time to do anything but 
watch, fight or run. We had some de- 
lightful times and some narrow es- 
capes, but none that quite came up to 
a certain adventure, or what some 
would call " a lively episode," crowded 
into a few seconds. 

In November I had left Cold 
Spring, alone, and, going farther up, 
had come across an acquaintance 
whom I had known by the name of 
' Jim." He was mining in a small 
stream, at the foot of the mountain, 
in company with a man named White. . 
Jim was a good-natured fellow, and 
about as resolute and hardy a man 
as could be found. White was a 
great, strong, muscular fellow, and 
afraid of nothing. They had a cabin 
and had lain in provisions for the win- 
ter. I was invited to stay with them 
awhile, and decided to do so. 

One night, soon after I reached 
there, we heard something rummaging 
about, outside the cabin, and White 
said it was probably a bear; but, as 
we could not fight a bear, very well, 
in the dark, he thought it best not to 
disturb him until daylight, and then, 
if he stayed about, we would have 
some bear meat. As soon as it was 
light enough we took our guns and 
strapped on our knives. I had a re- 
volver, which I shoved into my belt 
When we opened the door and looked 



87 



RECREA TION. 



out the bear was in sight, not far away, 
but too far to shoot from the cabin. 
He was an enormous grizzly, and was 
going slowly away. White ran down 
toward him and I followed. As we 
got nearer to him we both blazed 
away. Before either of us could load 
(we had no Winchester or other 
breech loaders then) the grizzly 
turned on us, and, with surprising 
quickness, had White between his 
paws, with his (White's) right arm in 
his capacious mouth. His eyes glared 
down on Jim, who had reserved his 
fire and was casting about trying to 
get in a shot without hitting White. 
White's left arm was still free. He 
had gotten hold of his knife and was 
driving it into the bear's side with ter- 
rible force, which soon made the bear 
let go White's arm and catch his head 
in his mouth. Just then Jim sent a 
ball crashing through the bear's heart, 



and I had meantime emptied my re- 
volver into his back. He rolled over, 
but not until he had taken White's 
scalp entirely off, with one ear and 2 
small pieces of skull bone with it. 

We pulled White away from the 
bear and got him to the cabin, as soon 
as possible. His head was an awful 
looking sight, but he was in his right 
mind and gave us directions how to 
wash off and bind up his head. After 
awhile, when he became quiet, he told 
Jim to take the pickle jar and put his 
scalp in it, with the ear and bones, and 
fill it with whisky, so they would keep. 
Jim said he would do it, but that it was 
" an awful waste of whisky." 

The bear was a very large one, and 
made one of the worst fights I had 
ever seen. Jim stayed with White un- 
til he recovered, while I returned to 
Cold Spring and sent in such supplies 
as they needed. 







» 





HB^*** \ ' 




No use to print this man's other name. Every reader of RECREATION will recognize 
him at sight. 



THE CONFESSIONS OF LYNX CANADENSIS. 



VV. E. CARLIN. 



Having met with 2 fellows who 
were photographing- for yon, and hav- 
ing been forced to have my own pict- 
ure taken, for reproduction in Rec- 
reation, whether I liked it or not, it 
appeared to me an opportune time to 
write yon a few words concerning my- 



seemecl so true and realistic that my 
heart (and my head, I fear) swelled 
with pride at the accounts of my 
prowess. 

Then I sallied forth determined to 
dine on old man Long, or on any other 
trapper who might come my way. But 




STEALTH. 



COPYRIGHT, 1897, BY WRIGHT & CARLIN. 



self and to clear up, in the minds of 
the younger generation, some of the 
ridiculous stones that have been told 
-of me, by romancers. 

What boy has not shuddered as he 
was told hair-raising tales of the mon- 
ster catamount, wild-cat, bob-cat, or 
" painter " who spends his time in 
waiting for the poor, lonely man; 
pouncing on him at sight, and tearing 
him, savagely, limb from limb, pre- 
paratory to a hearty meal? When I 
read these stories of myself, they 



my new-born pride met with a sad 
reverse; for although Long is only 5 
feet high, and weighs only 120 pounds, 
my spirits oozed out of my long legs 
when I saw the ease with which he 
handled his 80 pound pack; and it oc- 
curred to me that my little 25 pounds 
of nerve and sinew would count for 
naught, in case of any serious trouble 
with him. I therefore quickly got out 
of his way, and was forced to steal an 
old piece of dried meat, from his camp, 
for my supper. 



89 




COPYRIGHT, 1897, BY WRIGHT & CARLIN. 

DEFIANCE. 

I wish to say to the younger sports- 
men that my kind of critters does not 
attack men, under any circumstances, 
when we can get away. In fact we do 
not like men at all; and I have heard 
old mountaineers say, when talking 
over their campfires, that as many 
years as they had been in the hills, 
they never had seen a cussed cat yet, 
and they wondered where they kept 
themselves, anyway. 

We have no special range, but roam 
from the highest peaks to the lowest 
bottoms. In the day time we sleep in 




COFYR1GHT, 1897, BY WRIGHT & CARLIN. 

READY TO SPRING. 

some dense thicket — occasionally in 
some cave, in or under the shelving 
rock, where the sun does not pene- 
trate. As cool dusk comes on we 
prowl softly about, looking for some 
snow-shoe rabbit, or some grouse that 
has gone to roost on a low limb. 
Grouse are our favorite food. If there 
is anything we dote on it is a nice, 
tender, fat spring grouse. Many a 
young brood, or old drumming cock 
have I devoured, as the light grew 
dim, in the spring evening. It is very 
amusing to sit and watch an old cock 
grouse, as he swells and struts along 
his log; and when he has his thoughts 
full of his sweetheart, and begins to 
drum, to just make about 3 jumps, and 
then with one stroke to crush the life 
and conceit all. out of him. 

Of course squirrels, martens, etc., 
are all acceptable, when they come my 
way. I am also fond of the remains 
of deer, or other animals, killed by 
hunters, and I make a business of 



90 



THE CONFESSIONS OF LYNX CANADENSIS. 



Qr 



stealing old man Long's bear baits; 
for I know the pan of his trap is held 
tip by a No. 2 spring and that my 
weight won't set it off. 

Now about my expressions and at- 
titudes. It is past belief how taxi- 
dermists have managed to twist and 
distort me. You will see, by my vari- 
ous portraits, in this and the July issue 
of Recreation, that I don't stand up, 
with my ears pitched forward — like a 
horse neighing. Neither do I show 
my teeth and growl. Not at all. When 
I get mad I lay my ears well back, just 
as any other cat does ; and the madder 
I get the lower I lay them, producing 
a " snaky " expression, such as you 



will see in Evart Von Muyden's etch- 
ings of tigers and leopards. 

In order to get any large and satis- 
factory photos of me, you must either 
tree me, with dogs, or catch me in a 
trap. After once getting me, it will 
depend on your knowledge, and your 
handling of me, as to what expression- 
and what attitudes you succeed in 
catching. I forgot to mention that 
having deemed it best to spare old 
man Long's life, for reasons already 
set forth, I decided to get a piece of 
his bacon, but happened to step in a 
blamed old Newhouse trap; and that 
accounts for my sending you these 
notes. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY WILLIAM MOHAUPT. 



HERE THEY COME. 
Awarded Twentieth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




"AND I AM LONELY HERE. 1 ' 



OH MOTHER, TAKE THE WHEEL AWAY. 



OLD SONG. 



Oh mother, take the wheel away and put it out of sight, 
For I am heavy hearted and I cannot spin to-night: 
Come nearer, nearer yet, I have a story for your ear 
So come and sit beside me, come and listen, mother dear; 

You heard the village bells to-night; his wedding bells they were 

And Mabel is his happy wife, and I am lonely here; 

A year ago to-night, I mind, he sought me for his bride, 

And who so glad at heart as I, that happy Eastertide? 

But Mabel came among us, and her face was fair to see, 
What wonder was it, mother, that he thought no more of me? 
When first he said fair words to her I know she would not hear, 
But in the end she listened, — could she help it, mother dear? 

And afterward we met, and we were friendly all the same: 
For ne'er a word I said to them of anger or of blame 
Till both believed I did not care, and maybe they were right, 
But, mother, take the wheel away, I cannot spin to-night! 



93 



OUR ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 

STICKEEN. 



UP THE 



A. T. STONE. 



John Muir, who canoed the Stahkeena, 
or Great river, from mouth to head, in 1879, 
epitomized its finest reach as " a Yosemite 
100 miles long." It is said that 300 living 
glaciers drain directly into the Stickeen, 
and Professor Muir claimed to have 
counted 100 from his canoe. The river is 
wide and shallow at its mouth, with a cur- 
rent of about 5 miles an hour. 



reach the head waters of the Stickeen van- 
ished at once. 

The big, square sail was hoisted, and the 
10 miles run on salt water to Pt. Rothsay, 
at the mouth of the river, past picturesque 
Pt. Highfield, through Labouchere bay, 
past Kadin and Sergieff islands was quickly 
made. 

We were but 2 short miles from Wrangle, 
when we passed from the dark green to the 
yellowish, dirty white glacial flood of the 




GUIDE, IN THE SERVICE OF RECREATION'S 
ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 

When Recreation's exploring party 
made a second and successful attempt to 
stem the current of this mighty stream our 
monster Indian canoe was shoved from the 
landing at Ft. Wrangle, by a picked crew of 
Tlingit boatmen. I carefully noted the 
clock-like movements of these hardy, well 
drilled, muscular fellows, as they handled 
the long, heavy single sweeps, that shot our 
vessel into the open waters of the bay; and 
all doubts as to our being able, this time, to 



A GLIMPSE OF THE TAHLTAN RIVER, 

ALASKA. 

Stickeen. This stream is never clear. 
Draining these many glaciers of their milky 
waters, and cutting away its banks of yel- 
low clay and sand, its waters are well mixed 
ere they reach the sea. 

Just before reaching Pt. Rothsay we met 
a number of fishermen; and pulling along- 
side one of their dories inquired as to their 
success. As a result of the day's work they 
had hundreds of big, fat salmon. These 
were principally the kisutch or silver sal- 
mon, and king, chonicha or quinnat sal- 
mon. 



94 



OUR ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 



95 



As we were pulling away, one of the fis-h- 
ermen tossed a magnificent king salmon 
into our boat, weighing at least 35 lbs, re- 
marking as he did so, " there's your sup- 
per." I have no desire to excite the 
envy of my readers, but when camp was 
pitched that night, on one of the low, 
sparsely timbered islands, 5 miles farther 
on, juicy salmon roasts and thick, luscious 
steaks, disappeared in a manner most agree- 
able to tired, hungry men. 

How different to eat one of these fish 
when just leaving the salt water, fat and 
fresh, from taking even the same fish, a 
year later, as dealt from a tin can. 

Salmon were now plentiful in the river 



principal growths. These are thickly un- 
derlined with willows, alders, and devils 
thumbs in such tangled masses, as to make 
it next to impossible to penetrate them. 

The climate is moist and the heavy 
growth of moss that covers the earth, bury- 
ing rocks and tree trunks in its slippery 
folds, makes an unsafe footing. 

After passing the canyons, however, the 
country is much drier, and in many places 
rolls back into softly rounding but high 
hills. A perceptible change in the timber 
also takes place, birch and black pine be- 
coming quite frequent. 

One of the first objects of interest, on the 
way up the river, is the Popoff glacier. We 




PHOTO BY A. J. STONE. 

VIEW FROM THE GREAT GLACIER, STICKEEN RIVER, ALASKA. 



and as we traveled up stream together, we 
feasted on them day and night. Whenever 
we hungered the cruel salmon hook would 
bring us food, fresh from the icy flood. 
The man in the prow, pole in hand, would 
lift a big salmon without checking the mo- 
tion of the boat. 

The principal tributaries of the Stickeen 
are the Iskoot, the Scud, the Porcupine, the 
Clearwater, the Tahltan, the Tooya, the 
Tanzilla, and the 3 South forks. 

The principal glaciers are the Popoff, the 
Great, or Olebar, the Mud, the Flood and 
the Porcupine. 

For more than 100 miles from its mouth, 
the Stickeen's narrow valley is shut in by 
precipitous mountain walls, whose white 
mantling never disappears. The banks of 
the stream are heavily wooded, spruce, hem- 
lock, cottonwood, and cedar being the 



viewed it from the opposite side of the river, 
some 2 miles from its base. Here the sun 
shines fairly on its deeply corrugated face, 
just where it forces its way down a steep 
incline, from among higher mountains be- 
yond, and displays a great variety of shade- 
ings, or tintings, from its snowy crest to 
the deep blue of its lower strata. 

Some 15 miles farther up, the Iskoot 
joins its waters with those of the Stickeen, 
cutting its way through the rugged and im- 
posing Iskoot mountains, a branch of the 
Glacier range, to the South. 

The Glacier range shows hundreds of 
glittering needle points, apparently shaped 
from blocks of snow and ice. Recreation 
Range, so named in honor of the great 
magazine which sends out this expedition, 
lies farther inland and to the West of the 
Clearwater. This range is also clad in per- 




• "•'.' S'"*- ' . 



-V jr**- 




PART OF THE ICE FRONT, GREAT GLACIER, STICKEEN RIVER, ALASKA. 



petual snow, is saw-tooth-like in appear- 
ance, and with the thin, soft veiling of fleecy 
clouds, like so many plumes of white, fluffy 
feathers, forever hovering over and about 
it, presents the grandest, most beautiful and 
bewildering picture to be found anywhere 
in the coast range. 

The Iskoot is so large as often to be mis- 
taken for the Stickeen, by canoemen unac- 
customed to these waters, and several such 
parties have perished in trying to ascend it, 
believing they were yet on the Stickeen. 

It is almost impossible to navigate the 
Iskoot, even with Indian canoes, except at 
most favorable stages of water. Through- 
out its first 50 miles it winds through deep, 
rocky gorges and canyons, cut through 
wild mountains, with many rapids and bowl- 
ders to endanger navigation. The source 
of the stream is in a high, rolling plateau of 
softly undulating hills that stretches away 
in rear of the main coast range, Eastward 
toward the Rockies. Moose, caribou and 
mountain sheep, find in the regions of its 
head waters, fields unmolested by either the 
Indian or white hunter. Black bear are 
found throughout its entire limits, and the 
sitka, or big brown bear, in its lower dis- 
tricts. Goats are numerous in the high 
rocky districts near its mouth. 

A short distance above the mouth of the 
Iskoot you sight the Great Glacier, until 
recently supposed to be the largest empty- 
ing into the Stickeen. It is often visited in 
small steamers, chartered by parties who 
leave the large mail steamers at Ft. 
Wrangle, and offers a most delightful and 
interesting excursion. 



Here the tourist may have the satisfac- 
tion of walking and climbing over im- 
mense fields of ice, and of making an inter- 
esting collection of ferns, arctic mosses and 
pieces of wood that have been thrown out 
from underneath the glacier, where they 
have been traveling many centuries. 

The ice cliffs composing the front of the 
glacier rise in most places, abruptly, 500 to 
700 feet high. There are 3 or 4 places, how- 
ever, where the climb to the upper levels is 
easily made. 

From the surface the scene is a grand 
one. Looking up this great field of ice, as 
it stretches away and disappears in the 
bend of the mountain walls, you can 
scarcely realize that such a monster stream 
of ice has wound its way through the moun- 
tain range for more than 80 miles; yet such 
is the case. This glacier has never been 
fully explored, nor has its motion ever been 
recorded. 

Two Russian army officers once came 
down from Sitka for the purpose of explor- 
ing it, to its source; but were never heard 
of afterward. They were supposed to have 
been lost in one of the many crevices that 
break the surface of the great ice field. It 
is deeply gashed and difficult to traverse. 
In places great granite bowlders cover the 
surface; and at one point I found them 
piled high, in a 'confused mass, forming a 
ridge on the surface of the glacier more 
than a quarter of a mile in length. 

Just in front of the ice wall, we found the 
snarled and twisted remnants of ancient 
tree trunks. Some of them were of im- 
mense size, their surfaces worn smooth by 



96 



OUR ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 



97 



being rolled over and over, for ages, under 
this great body of ice, until finally thrown 
out on the moraine. 

Chief Shakes tells me that when his father 
first traveled on the Stickeen, this glacier 
extended to the river; and that he, him- 
self, knew it when it was very much nearer 
than now. Just back of Buck's bar, on the 
opposite side of the river, facing the Great 
glacier, is another and much smaller one. 
Indian tradition has it, that many years 
ago the 2 met, forming a great arch over 



from below, as proof of their having suc- 
cessfully passed through. 

These old men were ever afterward held 
in the highest esteem by their tribal asso- 
ciates. Canoes were no longer carried 
around, but travelers passed up and down 
stream beneath the ice bridge until, in the 
course of many years, it gradually wasted 
away and tumbled into the river. 

A few miles above the Great glacier. Mud 
or Dirt glacier pours through a defile, and 
still farther up is the Flood glacier. These 
first 4 are to the North of the river. The 




A FRIEND OF RECREATION'S EXPLORING 
EXPEDITION. 

the river several miles wide, around which 
the Indians carried their canoes and traps, 
over the ice. It is said that once, while a 
party of them were camped on the river's 
bank, just above this barrier, they con- 
cluded to put 2 of their number — " men 
who had grown worthless with age " — into 
a canoe and send them down stream, under 
the ice bridge, in order to ascertain if the 
passage could thus be made. 

Imagine the surprise of the camp when, 
several hours later, these 2 aged canoemen 
came paddling back up the stream, bring- 
ing with them the green branches of trees, 



TELEGRAPH, ALASKA; THE ONLY "CITY" 
ON THE STICKEEN RIVER. 

Recreation has ten subscribers who get mail at this 
Post-Office. 

Flood glacier is so named from its walls of 
ice, high up in the mountains, so formed 
as to shut in behind them the waters of a 
large lake. Several times this dam has been 
known to break, turning loose the waters 
of the lake and flooding the country below. 

Last of the important glaciers is the Por- 
cupine, which is South of the river and 
which is recognized as being the largest in 
the Stickeen region, though as yet but little 
known. 

Beyond the Porcupine moraine is the 




RECREATION RANGE, NEAR STICKEEN RIVER, ALASKA. 
So named in honor of this magazine, by Mr. A. J. Stone. 



much dreaded canyon, a gorge 3 of a mile 
long, where the Stickeen river — often a mile 
in width — narrows in between high, per- 
pendicular walls of granite to a width of ioo 
feet. The current here is terrific, the waters 
swirling and boiling in the wildest confu- 
sion. 

Nothing but the most heroic effort on the 
part of every man in the canoe, finally 
landed us in an eddy above, completely ex- 
hausted. Our big canoe tossed about from 
side to side, danced back and forth and 
more than once turned almost around, 
seemingly as helpless as a feather, tossed 
by the wind. 

Farther up we passed through the 
Kloocheman's, or Woman's canyon, so- 
called by the noble Stick, who, exhausted 
from paddling through the little canyon, 
here leaves the work of navigation entirely 
to his squaw. 

Still farther on we worked our way over 
the big riffle and our last difficulty, in reach- 
ing the head of navigation, was passed. 

We now reached the summer camps of 
the natives who fish in that great salmon 
stream, the Clearwater. 

Here a much drier and wholly different 
climate sets in, and the country opens out, 
in many places, into high rolling uplands, 
the timber growth much smaller and the 
under brush less dense, entirely disappear- 
ing in places. Here you get a farewell view 
of Recreation range, on your way up 
stream, after having been in sight of it most 
of the time during 40 miles of travel. 

We stopped at Shakesville, a place where 
our chief, " the master of the boat," dries 
his salmon catch. From there it is but a 



few hours to Glenora, a queer little town, 
composed of a single row of low one story 
log houses, strung along the banks of the 
river for some distance, and now entirely 
deserted, by all its former inhabitants with 
the exception of the venerable Mr. 
Pritchett, the Canadian customs officer, 
from whom we obtained much valuable in- 
formation. 

Ten days from Wrangle we landed at 
Telegraph Creek, 12 miles above Glenora. 
This is 200 miles from Wrangle. Telegraph 
Creek is the head of navigation on the river 
and is the only trading post in the Stickeen 
river country. It has 2 general stores, 4 or 
5 white and a few native residents. 

It is a romantic little place, situated on 
the banks of the river; shut in from either 
side by deep canyon walls and facing the 
hills on the opposite side of the river which 
rise to such a height as to completely shut 
out the sun for 3 months, during the winter. 

Here the Great canyon begins. Its for- 
midable walls are cut from a solid bed of 
lava forming a gorge 60 miles long, through 
which no craft can travel. It is grand and 
beautiful in the extreme. In winter it forms 
an excellent highway for snow shoes and 
sledgemen, into the well stocked hunting 
grounds farther back, where moose and 
caribou abound. 

The surveyors on this section of the Co- 
lumbia overland telegraph route, which was 
to extend from Puget Sound through Brit- 
ish N. W. Territory and Alaska, and to 
connect with a line on the Siberian coast by 
a cable through Bering straits, were here 
recalled, in 1866, after the announcement of 
the successful laying of the Atlantic cable. 




RECREATION PEAK, NEAR STICKEEN RIVER, ALASKA. 
So named in honor of this magazine, by Mr. A. J. Stone. 



A little creek empties into the river here, 
where the party was encamped and the 
place took the name of Telegraph Creek. 
It was at Glenora that the thousands of 
miners landed, in 1874, bound for the Cas- 
siar district. It was from this place, by 
way of Telegraph Creek, that the Canadian 
government built a trail to Dease lake, for 
their accommodation. In that year 2,000 
men produced $1,000,000 in gold; and now 
the old Cassiar district is all but forgotten. 

From Telegraph we traversed the coun- 
try drained by the first South fork, reach- 
ing the high table land, 65 miles to the 
South, from which the Iskoot and the South 
fork take their course; the Iskoot making 
a graceful sweep to the West and then 
Northwest into the Stickeen. The South 
fork flows Northwest, into the Stickeen, 2 
miles below Telegraph. 

The plant life of this high plateau, which 
stretches away for many miles, in every di- 
rection, consists chiefly of mosses, though a 
few tiny willows are found in the low 
swales, and a few small, stunted pines grow 
in the canyons. 

From the rear of this table land, rises a 
series of low mountain peaks or domes, 
some of which are completely buried be- 
neath everlasting fields of snow and ice. 
Others are partially or completely exposed. 

We visited a number of the latter and 
were surprised to find that in many cases 
a distinctive individuality in geological 
composition exists; one being composed 
largely of obsidian, mingled with broken 
masses of granite; another entirely of dark 



gray granite; another a perfectly rounded 
dome of reddish felsite and yet another of 
dark colored shales and slates, mixed with 
lime stone. 

Scattered along the beds of shallow 
ravines, that extend across the table land, 
parallel to each other and draining the fields 
of snow and ice, we found large quantities 
of lava, many pieces of which were nearly 
round and about the size of a man's head. 
They were honey combed, or perforated, 
and were so light as to float when thrown 
in the water. 

We later passed some time on the Tahl- 
tan river, among the Tahltan Indians, at a 
point where they take their winter's supply 
of salmon. Here they construct lodges by 
means of small, leaning poles, for walls, and 
spruce bark for a covering. 

The salmon are stripped and hung be- 
neath the roof to dry, the natives sleeping 
on the ground, in the corners, with the fire 
in the centre for cooking. Near a number 
of these drying houses was a long beach, the 
rock and gravel of which were completely 
saturated, for weeks, with the blood of the 
slaughtered fish. 

The fish, when dried, is not carried to the 
villages, but to the cache, or store house, of 
the family. In the timber scattered over the 
hills, in the country 2 to 5 miles from their 
village and drying station, each family has 
its cache where all surplus foods, blankets, 
guns, ammunition, etc., are stored; and 
here the stock of dried salmon is taken, 
every fall, to be drawn upon as needed. 

They say that should the village burn 



99 



IOO 



RECREA TION. 



while its people were away in the Stick, on 
their big hunt, they would still have their 
food left. 

The cache is constructed by placing in 
the ground, at right angles, 4 round posts, 
8 to 10 feet high and usually occupying a 
space about 6 by 8 feet. On top of these 2 
long logs are fastened, opposite each other. 
Across these a floor is made, of straight 
poles, carefully fitted to one another. On 
top of this a log house is built, about 4 feet 
above the floor, and covered with spruce 
bark. It is made sufficiently tight to shed 
snow and rain and the height puts the con- 
tents out of the reach of bears and wolves. 

A striking illustration of the honesty of 
these people, and of the confidence they 
have in one another is given in the fact that 
natives have been known to starve, but 
never to rob one another's caches. They 
might pilfer the ictas (merchandise) of the 
white trader, from his place of business, but 
the personal effects of the white man they 
would not touch. All summer long the 
cabin in which we kept our supplies was left 
unlocked and we were away in the moun- 
tains for weeks, leaving expensive guns, 
field glasses, hunting knives, ammunition, 
and many other articles an Indian would 
delight in; but they were never disturbed. 
These Indians, as well as all others, like the 
best of a trade, but they will not steal. 

When we were in camp on the Tahltan 
these people had just commenced carrying 
their dried fish to the cache. Old, feeble 
men and women, and small children, all 
joined the middle aged and the strong, on 
the trail to the cache. Each carried a bale 
as large as he could manage, and as they 
climbed the high bluff, from the drying 
station at the river's edge, winding in single 
file back and forth along the crooked trail, 
the entire party joined in a monotonous 
chant. 

I learned that this same song was always 
used on departing from or returning to the 
village and they told me it denoted happi- 
ness, or at least contentment. 

As showing the thriftiness of the Tahl- 
tans I will relate an incident that occurred 
while traveling in their country. We had 
pitched camp one evening on a long, dry 
beach, shut in by high, dry lava walls. 
There were 2 or 3 acres of this little level 
tract and about 100 yards from where we 
made our halt, several native families were 
camping. We threw our duffle on the 
ground and opened it out promiscously. 
Among my traps was a small case in which 
I carried a comb, a brush, and other things, 
including a number of papers of needles, 
put up in fancy wrappers that I had brought 
along to use in trading with the natives. 

Fuel here was scarce and while Ed. and 
our Indian, Billy, were picking up some 
small dead branches, left by some previous 
camper, with which to start a fire, I went 
to skirmish for wood. After searching al- 



most every part of the little flat, I finally 
found a good dry stick that was about as 
large as I could carry. It was the only 
stick of wood I could find. 

It was soon blazing on the camp fire and 
the heat from it was just browning the pan 
bread, when a stalwart Indian, somewhat 
past the middle age, came walking hur- 
riedly up to camp, looked us over, then 
looked at the fire and with an expression of 
anger depicted in his face, commenced talk- 
ing to Billy. The latter told me this man 
claimed the wood. He said wood was very 
scarce there, and was secured at the ex- 
pense of great labor, by the Indians, who 
had gone several miles up stream to gather 
and float it down. The old man demanded 
that we take this wood from the fire and 
return it to him. 

I told him, through my interpreter, that I 
was sorry we had made the mistake, but 
that the wood was burning and could not 
now be returned if we wished; but our vis- 
itor grew only the more angry. No argu- 
ment I could offer had any effect on him. 

Finally, I stepped over to my pack, took 
out a paper of needles and offered them to 
him. This saved our wood and our supper. 
He took the needles and examined them 
carefully. The expression on his face 
brightened. He shook me by the hand and 
then hurried away to show them to his 
kloochman. 

I now felt sure the wood was ours; but 
imagine my surprise when, in a few min- 
utes, another Indian appeared on the scene 
and claimed the same stick of wood! He 
wore, if possible, a more angry and fore- 
boding look than his predecessor. Again 
we parleyed but it was no go. The old Ind- 
ian grew wild and seemed determined to 
have the wood. Supper was almost ready 
and we were all very hungry. I therefore 
closed the argument by again paying for 
the wood, with another paper of needles, 
and receiving the old man's blessing. 

When the bread was baked we drew from 
the fire the remnants of the log, believing it 
was now doubly our property and knowing 
we should need it in the morning. We 
were just comfortably seated at our even- 
ing meal, when to our astonishment, up 
bobbed a third claimant. This one acted dif- 
ferently. He sat down on the ground, some 
distance away, and contented himself with 
eyeing us while we ate. He wore a sad, de- 
jected look and acted as though he realized 
he was too late to run a successful bluff. 
He was not so well supplied with nerve, 
and was not so capable of pushing a busi- 
ness proposition 'as the men who had come 
before him. 

Finally he came around and examined 
our guns and other traps. He expressed 
great surprise at all he saw. He placed my 
12 pound rifle to his shoulder and sighted 
along the barrel. Then he took from my 
cartridge belt a 45-100-550 Sharps special, 



OUR ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 



101 



and examined it with profound astonish- 
ment. Finally, pointing to the cartridge 
and then to some hills, several miles distant, 
he signaled his faith in this great engine of 
death. 

The little open box containing the nee- 
dles finally caught his eye. That was the 
thing. It was the wonder of wonders. He 
stooped low over the box and examined it 
from every side. Then he very cautiously 
lifted a package of the needles, looked at 
them and carefully replaced them. Stand- 
ing erect he now gazed at me, and then at 
the needles. All this time not a word had 
been spoken, but that face — what a study 



with different members of this tribe and 
learned much of their history. They are 
the only tribe living on the Stickeen and 
number 270 souls. The Sticks, from Ft. 
Wrangle, hunt the lower Stickeen but have 
no homes there. 

The Tahltans are tall, slender and ath- 
letic; good travelers and good hunters. 
They produce, annually, in addition to other 
furs, about 100 silver foxes, or 1-14 of the 
world's output. 

The Tahltans live in comfortable log 
houses, or rancharies, covered with boards. 
Many of the houses are also partially or 
completely floored with rough pine boards, 




HOME CAMP, RECREATION'S EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 
Head of Canoe Navigation, Stickeen River, Alaska. 



for an artist! Expressions of wonder, 
amazement, curiosity, delight, doubt, anx- 
iety, hope, expectation, all followed one an- 
other over it with the greatest rapidity. 

He was no ordinary business man. He 
was a diplomat, and he won his case by the 
practice of native sagacity and cunning. I 
walked over to the pack, gave him a paper 
of needles and his delight and gratitude 
were unbounded. 

So ended the embarassment of the early 
evening. It had been converted into an 
unusually interesting entertainment, afford- 
ing me a most excellent opportunity for a 
study of the character and expressions of 
these simple minded people. Later in the 
fall I met in camp this same outfit on the 
same camp ground, and they brought us 
wood and tent poles to burn. They did not 
ask for pay. We were friends now. 

I spent many evenings in conversation 



whip sawed from the trees by hand. The 
practice regarding the disposition of the 
dead is not uniform. Some of them cre- 
mate, others bury the body. In either case, 
the belongings of the dead are carefully 
packed, in cheap wooden trunks, and placed 
on the grave. 

The decoration of their graves is not so 
elaborate as in the case of the Tlingits; 
nor do the Tahltans erect totems. 

When a young man wishes to marry, he 
makes his wishes known to an uncle, or an 
elder, who purchases for him the object of 
his fancy. After marriage this young man 
assumes his wife's tribal name — i.e., if his 
wife is a crow and he was a wolf, he now 
becomes a crow. He goes to live with his 
wife's people, becomes one of their hunting 
party and, in fact, severs all relationship 
with his own family. 

The Tahltans no longer recognize a chief l 



102 



RECREA TION. 



but those who are ambitious to become 
prominent in the tribe, must buy such 
honors. To do this means hard work, self- 
denial and the exercise of good judgment. 

When one of these fellows determines to 
become a Ti-ye, or great man, among his 
people, he puts forth extra efforts in the 
pursuit of furs. He becomes economical 
in his living expenses, and allows no op- 
portunity to pass by which he may add to 
his stores. 

At the end of the season's hunt, he brings 
his catch to the trader, squares accounts, 
and, if his efforts have been rewarded and a 
balance is due him, he receives this balance 
in blankets, guns, muslin, and tobacco. 
These are taken to his cache and carefully 
put away. Fortunate hunters have been 
known to accumulate, in one year, $500 
worth of this truck, though rarely more 
than $100, and generally less. The deposit 
is added to during a period of 5 to 20 years, 
according to his success and ambition. 

When finally satisfied that his' wealth is 
sufficient with which to buy the honors he 
wishes, his goods are all brought to some 
place convenient to his rancharie, and in- 
vitations are sent to all those he desires 
present, generally the entire village popu- 
lation. 

A rancharie is usually about 30 or 40 feet 
square, with but one entrance. 

When the time arrives for the ceremonies 
of the potlatch to begin, the host takes the 
seat of honor, at the rear of the room, fac- 
ing the door. Several young men are ap- 
pointed to act as a reception committee and 
to seat the guests as indicated by the host. 
His chosen friends and the most distin- 
guished men are seated at the immediate 
right and left of the host, and the others are 
disposed of according to their social im- 
portance. Those of but little consideration 
are seated, or left standing, near the door. 
Pipes and tobacco are now distributed 
alike to all present, and while the smoke 
proceeds the ushers bring the goods to be 
distributed, piling them in a confused mass 
in the centre of the room. 

When all are brought the host makes a 
speech, expressive of his good will toward 
his fellow men and of his desire to honor 
them as is their due. Then begins the dis- 
tribution of gifts, the ushers delivering the 
parcels after his directions. The value of 
the gifts depends entirely on the goods ac- 
cumulated and on the number of guests 
present. If the donor has been successful 
in all probability the present to the first 
man on his right will be 5 blankets and a 
rifle. This latter is always a Winchester — 
they know no other. The man on the left 
will get 4 blankets and a rifle, and so on 
down. 

When nearing the door, or entrance, 10 
yards of muslin is usually given, and to 
those immediately next to the entrance, 
only one yard of muslin is allotted. Every- 



one accepts his position and his gift with- 
out question, and all express profound 
thanks. Many of the more prominent 
guests, make short, enthusiastic speeches in 
honor of the now great and influential man 
— the big Ti-ye. 

Social etiquette demands that whenever 
one of these guests gives a potlatch he must 
invite the present master of ceremonies and 
give him 2 like articles for each one re- 
ceived here. 

The Tahltan and the Tooya rivers are 2 
of the few tributaries of the Stickeen not 




THE LEAPING SALMON. 

fed by glaciers. From the Tahltan to the 
Tooya our route followed high, dry ridges; 
and on making our descent into the canyon 
of the Tooya I thought, for a time, the river 
would never be reached. Down, down, we 
went, zig-zaging back and forth as though 
on a winding stairway; and the climb on 
the other side of the river was equally long 
and tedious. 

The canyon of the Tooya is the grandest, 
boldest, and most picturesque illustration 
of Nature's carving to be seen anywhere 
within the Stickeen basin. In many places 
solid granite walls rise to a perpendicular 
height of more than 1,000 feet. At one 
place, facing one of these from the opposite 
side of the river, equally imposing and far 
more interesting, was a wall composed of a 
great many different layers, of as many dif- 
ferent formations. Each layer presented a 
distinct color. There were subdued shades 
of pink, ecru, red, slate, and green. 

Along the crest of these high walls grows 
a lace-like fringe of the slender, graceful 
black pine, just back of which rises, one 
upon another, great high benches, up which 
our path wound through scattered clumps 
of stunted pines. 

In many places sections from the granite 
walls have tumbled into the narrow channel 
of the river and dammed it to a height of 50 
feet. Through these obstructions it forces 
its way in torrents of foam and spray. 



OUR ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION. 



IG 3 



At every point we visited the river came 
pouring through these beds of rocks, yet 
the monster king and silver salmon, would 
continue to fight their way up stream, 
seeming to, in some way, surmount every 
obstacle. 1 spent several days watching the 
salmon, and was astounded at the wonder- 
ful pugnacity with which they fight their 
way to the source of the river. I have seen 
them repeatedly attempt the passage of a 
certain fall until, completely exhausted, 
they would retire to some convenient eddy 
for rest, preparatory to a renewed effort; 
but never have I seen one of them give any 
indication of surrender, or show inclina- 
tion to return down stream. What a lesson 
to doubtful, weakened, and discouraged 
humanity! What a striking illustration of 
the determined effort necessary for the 
human traveler through this Northern 
wilderness. 

Among a number of salmon taken from 
the Tooya, the noses of several were bat- 
tered or torn off against the rocks. I 
managed to get pictures of several salmon 
during their efforts to clear the falls. 

The source of the Tooya is in a large 
lake, to the North, near Level mountain. 
This mountain is also the home of the 
woodland caribou. 

From the Tooya we passed over a stretch 
of high land, through forests of small 
spruce and black pine, 35 miles to the Tan- 
zilla, the last important tributary of the 
Stickeen from the North. Crossing the 
Tanzilla into the Hoo-tai-luh mountains, 
we pitched camp, for several days, on a 
high, rolling, moss covered plain. From 
this camp we climbed a high, rocky knoll, 
from which we could overlook a country 
drained by the Stickeen, the Yukon, and 
the Mackenzie, which empty their waters, 
respectively, into the Pacific ocean, Bering 
sea, and the Arctic ocean. 

Wherever we went, on this mountain we 
found it covered with a deep, spongy moss, 
thickly studded with tiny flowers of every 
conceivable color and shape. Small groves 
of balsam grew here and there, and their 
branches made soft sweet scented beds. 

Returning to Telegraph Creek we made 
several long journeys into the mountains, 
in various directions. Black bear are fairly 
plentiful throughout the entire Stickeen 
region. The grizzly is found on its head 
waters and the sitka, or big brown bear, in 
the lower river country. 

Goats are plentiful in the mountain ad- 
jacent the river, as far up as the little can- 
yon, or 100 miles from the coast, but are 
not numerous above that point. Sheep 



are found in the Chee-on-nee and Et 
se-zah mountains, to the South of Tele- 
graph. Moose and caribou are in fair num- 
bers in the whole of the upper country, but 

are rarely found below the canyon or on 
the coast side- of the ran 

The moose confine themselves to certain 
general territories, hut not so closely to any 
particular locality as do the caribou. The 
former are great travelers and are known 
to indulge in some peculiar cross country 
runs. 

Spruce or Canada grouse are plentiful in 
some of the timbered districts, and willow 
and rock ptarmigan are found on the high- 
er stretches of country. 

Any ambitious sportsman, who may make 
a trip up the Stickeen in July, returning in 
late fall, will be richly rewarded. He will 
have opportunities to get bear, moose, car- 
ibou, sheep, and goats. 

Telegraph Creek is the best point to hunt 
from and parties going could secure com- 
fortable passage on the " Alaska," a small 
steamer that plies the Stickeen from Ft. 
Wrangle. 

At Telegraph Creek can also be had 
blankets and provisions of all kinds neces- 
sary for the hunt. This would obviate 
the necessity of carrying much luggage. 
Here, too, the traders will provide you a 
cabin to camp in and will take the best of 
care of you. If you want a guide they will 
select for you a young Indian, who is trus- 
ty, a good hunter, and a good camp maker. 

Captain Callbreath, of the Alaska, makes 
the trip pleasant for people traveling with 
him and gives them a chance to visit some 
of the glaciers and other points of interest 
on the river. You can shoot bald eagles 
from the deck of the steamer, as they sit in 
the lofty cottonwoods that line the stream, 
or as they pass over. You can take salmon, 
with an Indian salmon pole, weighing 20 
to 65 pounds. You can bring home some 
fine game heads, Indian curios, beautiful 
specimens of lichens, mosses, and arctic 
flowers. You will see little wax-like butter- 
cups, just showing their heads along the 
edges of snow and ice, in August. You can 
sleep on sweet scented camp beds, made of 
spruce and balsam, drink pure water and 
breathe pure air; and you will return home 
with renewed health and vigor. 

A delightful route to Alaska, from the 
East, is via the New York Central, the 
Grand Trunk, through Canada and Michi- 
gan, the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul, 
the Northern Pacific Railway to Seattle 
and thence by the Pacific Coast Steamship 
Company's steamers. 



PETE. 



II. A. IIOKTON. 



Pete was only an aged cow-pony, when I 
became acquainted with him; but what a 
good companion he was! He was brought 
up to the mine for my use, from the ranch 
down near Orchard, where he had been 
raised and thoroughly instructed in his pro- 
fession. He had a well developed vein of 
humor, which would come to the surface 
just at the time when it was not wanted. 
He was also proud of his education, and 



The " ghost had walked " a few days be- 
fore the friends arrived, and, knowing there 
was a tender spot in the makeup of most 
ladies for candy, I had sent down to the city 
for a 5 pound box. The visitors had been 
with us 2 days when one of the men 
brought me word there was an express 
parcel for me, at the office. I went out to 
get Pete, and while cinching on the saddle 
told him what I was going after; the hopes 




I PLAYED MULE ; HE WAS THE BOAT AND I TOWED HIM." 



without asking one's permission would dis- 
play it. One day our friendship was 
broken: and although Pete was thoroughly 
repentant, after the occurrence, it was a 
long while before we were back on the old 
terms again. 

Some company came up to see us, among 
whom was one of the brightest young 
ladies I ever had the pleasure of meeting. 
She could shoot and cast a fly, and as for 
riding, it was a picture to see her come 
across the flat, on her pony, her hair 
•streaming out behind, quirt flying and the 
pony going as only they do when the 
" brush " is in sight and the " pack " in full 
cry. 



I had, in connection with the bundle, and 
for gracious sake not to make an exhibi- 
tion of me. But fate was against me. As 
I pulled up in front of the house to take 
some letters with me, to mail, I noticed 
some cattle on the side of the mountain. 
As soon as old Pete heard the cow-bell 
tinkle which w r as on one of the critters he 
proceeded to " cut " her out. The drama 
was well staged and the audience was vocif- 
erous in its applause. Pete was the hero, 
the bell-cow the villain, I the unwilling 
comedian, the cattle the populace. 

I didn't want the cow, but as Pete was so 
determined about it he had his own way. 
I tried to convince him he had come on be- 



io6 



RECREA TIOlV. 



fore his " cue " had been given, but it was 
no go — he cut. 

To be sure it was only a curtain raiser, 
but it was a dandy. When I left him he was 
doing his part well. The curtain had be- 
come hung up, some way, and I made a 
hasty exit over Pete's tail and walked down 
to the office, after the candy. 

The following spring, when the warm 
spell came on and the willows and cotton- 
woods had fuzzed up, one of those itching 
spells came on me. For the partial allay- 
ment of this I pulled out my fly book, rod 



taken the antidote and felt well again. How 
I did enjoy it! The delicious air w r as like 
champagne, just opened^ and made me feel 
as though I could fly. The beautiful little 
meadow, with the brook running through 
it, singing its song of gladness because 
grim old winter had gone, and the grand 
mountains rising on either side, clothed 
with spruce which mercenary vandals had 
not reached as yet, were as a dream of 
elysium. 

But food does not grow on trees, out that 
way, and not being herbivorous, like my 




"HE HESITATED A MOMENT, AND CAUTIOUSLY STARTED." 



and line and went out and talked it over 
with Pete, with whom I had become friend- 
ly again. We came to a mutual agreement 
that the only cure was to go over to the 
Park and try the trout. We went — or 
rather I went and Pete followed. I played 
mule; he was the boat and I towed him 
over the divide in true Erie canal style. 
I carried the bridle over my shoulder, pull- 
ing for all I was worth, while Pete's nose, 
the top of his head, his back and tail formed 
a good illustration of what a straight line 
should be. 

We had 2 glorious days in the Park. To 
be sure I caught but one little trout and he 
was returned whence he came; but I had 



friend Pete, I reluctantly pulled up and 
started for home. Pete expostulated with 
me, the best he could, for he wanted to stay 
and burst his sides with the fresh grass, in 
which he had wallowed with true equine 
delight. But I didn't see it that way. 

Poor old Pete! I wonder if he felt he was 
starting on a long, unknown journey. I 
don't think he did, for a more frisky old 
horse never trod the range. As we got up 
to the top of the range we found it had 
been snowing and the trail was extremely 
slippery. I walked for I knew it would 
make better traveling for him. A more 
careful fellow I never saw. In fact, he 
traveled as though he had been bred in the 



RECORD BUFFALO II FADS. 



107 



mountain. Coming to a greasy spot, in the 
trail, he would squat down and slide, after 
the manner of a small boy going down an 
incline, on a barrel stave. Pete didn't have 
a stave, but only that with which Dame 
Nature had provided him. 

We had come to a portion of the trail 
which was extremely dangerous. It was a 
heavy down grade, of smooth rock, and a 
corner had to be turned at a sharp angle. 
On one side the rock dropped off into the 
canyon. On the other it rose so steeply 
that only a mountain sheep could hold on. 
Pete didn't like it. Neither did I, but we 
couldn't go around. He hesitated a mo- 
ment and cautiously started. He went all 
right a short distance, but I saw he could 
not hold himself. His shoes were worn 
smooth, and were almost as good a tobog- 
gan as the barrel stave. He had, by this 
time, obtained such headway that I saw he 
could never turn the corner and that it was 



all day with him. He realized it too, I 
think; for just before he went over the 
edge he gave me a backward look that I 
shall never forget. When I had climbed 

down to where he lay he was dead. 

* * * 

It was noon the following day before I 
had finished the cairn over him, for I was 
determined nothing should disturb his body 
if I could help it. I was only sorry I could 
not do better by him. 

His memory is green beside that of the 
homeliest and best dog I ever had, who was 
cruelly poisoned and who came home to 
die. I am not bloodthirsty but there are 
times when one feels murder is justified. 

But why dwell; I know that when the 
time comes for me to " cash in " and go 
over the great divide the first being to greet 
me will be Commodore, his stubby tail 
wagging merrily; and Pete will be a good 
second. 





RECORD BUFFALO HEADS. 

The man who first began to judge buf- 
falo heads by measuring their horns, 
should have been called down off the lad- 
der before the silly fashion was set. To 



ignore the bulk of a buffalo head and the 
hair that adorns it, and to base everything 
on the measurements of the horns, is sim- 
ply absurd. If persisted in, it is inexcus- 
able; and the cut on the cover of May 
Recreation is all I need in proof of this 
assertion. The big horns are there, but, 
heavens! what hair! The head looks as if 
it had been industriously trimmed, by one 
of those infernal barbers who insist on cut- 
ting your hair shorter than you want it- 
even when you have none to spare. 

The glory of a buffalo head lies in its 
hair, — the length, the texture, and the color 
of it. Next in importance is the actual 
bulk of the head. Nobody, that I ever saw, 
cares a rap about the horns, so long as they 
are perfect in shape and symmetry. If the 
tumble of wavy, chestnut-brown tufts, in 
the frontlet, is sufficiently luxuriant to half 
bury the horns, so much the better. The 
horns of a buffalo are no more an index to 
his greatness, or his beauty, than are the 
ears of a Dublin donkey. It would be just 
as sensible to measure front teeth, to find 
the prize winner in a beauty show, as to 
measure horns to find the finest bison head. 

As an illustration of what I consider a 
superlatively fine buffalo head, and one 
which I challenge the world to surpass in 
real magnificence, I will ask the editor of 
Recreation to reproduce the head of the 
big bull that forms the principal figure in 
the group of buffaloes in the National 
Museum. W. T. H. 

It is shown herewith. — Editor. 



MY WIFE'S MOOSE. 



\V. I".. BEMIS. 



We had fished for bass and hunted for 
partridges a number of seasons; my wife 
had learned to handle her rod and shotgun 
with skill, but we longed to try our hands 
on big game. Thus it happened, that the 
last week in September, 2 innocents were 
fairly started for Will Atkins' camps, on the 
headwaters of the Aroostook river, in 



with clothing and actual necessities. These 
rubber bags are almost indispensable, tak- 
ing, as they do, everything from a camera 
to toilet articles. What is more important, 
they keep them dry, too. 

A 3-mile drive brought us to the river, 
where we found 2 canoes, very cranky af- 
fairs, of cedar, canvas covered, with small 




OX THE AROOSTOOK RIVER. 



Northern Maine. The camps are 50 miles 
from Masardis, the nearest railroad point. 
One rainy afternoon we left the caboose of 
a way-freight, at this station, where we 
were met by our guide. 

A drive of 12 miles, through a drenching 
rain, brought us to a place called Oxbow, 
the end of civilization, where an oldfash- 
ioned farm house had been turned into a 
postoffice and hotel. Here an excellent 
supper and the cheerful glow of a log fire, 
revived our dampened spirits. I learned 
during the evening, we were to be " poled " 
up the Aroostook river about 40 miles. It 
was necessary to have 2 canoes and a sec- 
ond guide. 

The next morning, having dressed for 
the woods, we packed 2 rubber navy bags 



seats in the bows. With Spinney to guide 
my wife, and Fred, long pole in hand, stand- 
ing erect in the stern of my canoe, we were 
off with a shove that sent us out into the 
current. 

I vowed I would learn the trick of pol- 
ing; but after several disastrous attempts, 
was forced to admit as a poler I am not a 
success. It is wonderful how far an ex- 
perienced boatman can send his canoe with 
one shove; and how, poling from one side 
only, he pushes around rocks and through 
eddies. At 2 o'clock we arrived at Salmon 
pool camp, where we remained for the 
night. 

We made an early start, the next morn- 
ing, and after covering 14 miles, arrived at 
the lean-to. Here we had our first meal 



T09 




BACK CAMP, CHANDLER LAKE, ME. MR. AND MRS. BEMIS AND GUIDE. 



over a camp-fire; and the moose-bird, or 
Canada jay, came and made friends with us, 
and ate off the same board. 

There was no time to linger, so we were 
soon on our way again. With 10 miles to 
our credit, night came on as we approached 
the falls. The guides were to " carry " and 
to work the canoes up, while we were to 
follow a path through the woods, to a point 
above the falls. 

It was dark, but my wife and I felt our 
way along, until, somehow, we lost the 
path. The thought of spending a night in 
the woods was anything but pleasant. We 
were grateful indeed when the light of the 
moon came through the trees; for by its 
aid we managed to reach the river. We 
could not see the falls, nor did we know 
whether the guides had gone on ahead; but 
no more forest for us. On the bank of that 
river we would stay until called for. Soon 
we heard the men coming, having been de- 
layed, in patching one of the canoes. 

Two miles farther we glided into Round 
pond, and the poles were lain aside for the 
paddles. To go suddenly from the rush- 
ing river, with the splashing and pounding 
of brass-pointed poles, into smooth water, 
and on such a night, was delightful. A 
glorious moon turning the foliage to silver; 
not a sound from any living thing; not the 
rustle of a leaf, nor even the air stirring; 
not a sound from the paddle, not so much 
as a drop of water. Never until that mo- 
ment had I realized what is meant by still- 
ness. 

Soon we came to a dam, over which we 



carried, and Millnocket lake spread out be- 
fore us. 

The canoes were paddled swiftly toward 
an island in the centre. A light appeared; 
then another and another. Fred said, 
" Camp," and I was glad, for I was cold 
and hungry. Our host was at one of the 
back camps, but his wife expected us. A 
cabin had been prepared and a log fire 
awaited us. 

It rained steadily the next 2 days, so 
we simply rested. When Atkins returned 
he explained the situation of the back 
camps, and I consulted him as to which 
would be the best for moose. All but 2 
were occupied. One, an old logging camp, 
at Chandler lake, was very rough, but in a 
good game country, where practically no 
hunting had been done. I decided on this. 

After breakfast, the 3d morning, our little 
party started. Soon we crossed the lake, 
took a parting shot at 2 screaming loons, 
beached our canoes, and, loaded down with 
packs, plunged, Indian file, into the woods 
on a tramp of 9 miles. We were now in the 
country of big game, and life in the woods 
was a fact. 

Evidences of game were seen all along 
the trail. Here a big bull moose, there a 
cow, then a buck and a doe, occasionally a 
caribou. Stopping now and then to study 
a fresh track, while our guides explained it 
all, learning at every step something of 
game, the day passed; and it was a day 
never to be forgotten. 

At 5 o'clock the dead water of Chandler 
lake was reached. Here was a canoe, into 



MY WIFE'S MOOS/']. 



i i r 



which vvc placed our packs. My wife got 
in with Spinney and started up the dead 
water. Fred and I had 2 miles to go, 
through the woods, to meet them at the up- 
per end. 

Just as the sun was setting, we ap- 
proached the water, at an opening in the 
woods. A splash and the click of a reel 
were heard, and then I saw my wife, very 
much excited, her fly rod bent nearly 
double, her reel running away from her, 
while down stream there was a swirl and a 
splash. She certainly had hold of some- 
thing. The guide and I sat on a log and 
watched the sport. 

It was her first big trout. Three times 
she brought him to the canoe, not so bad, 
for the water was filled with stumps, rocks, 
and tree tops. The landing-net had been 
forgotten, and the guide could not land 
him. Each time he got away with a rush. 
With my wife standing in a cranky canoe, 
scolding her guide — he, poor fellow, having 
his hands full to keep the canoe from up- 
setting — it was sport indeed. The 4th time 
she brought her trout up he laid over on 
his side, and they took him in. 

Once more she made a cast, and had a 
rise; a 2d cast and she hooked another. 
Profiting by her experience with the 1st 
trout, she soon landed this one. I got the 
scales from the pack and weighed them. 
The first weighed exactly 3, the other 2^4 
pounds. 

They were the largest brook trout I had 
ever seen. These, with the signs of big 
game all around, made me feel we had in- 
deed come to the right place. 

It was almost dark when we arrived at 
camp. A more forlorn looking place I 
never had seen. A cabin of rough logs hav- 
ing 2 small windows, partly closed with 
pieces of glass; flooring of round logs, with 
spaces between; rough beds covered with 
fir boughs; a board across 2 barrels for a 
table; a barrel of flour and some salt pork, 
the provisions. One good thing was a 
stove, in which we soon had a fire. Then 
with the lamp lighted, biscuits in the oven 
and trout frying, our dismal quarters as- 
sumed a more cheerful air. 

Our first morning in the wilderness was 
warm and pleasant. A few yards away lay 
Chandler lake, 3 miles long and one wide. 

Here was a 2d canoe, so it was decided 
that nvy wife and Spinney should explore 
the lake while Fred and I hunted along the 
dead water. On the way to our canoe 3 
deer were started, but they were too quick 
for me. I saw their flags, then they were 
gone; noiselessly, swiftly, like shadows. 
By the time we were afloat I was pretty 
well excited. I fully expected to meet a 
whole menagerie at every step. It was a re- 
markable morning. Fred said " everything 
is coming our way." 

We paddled slowly down the stream; a 
narrow strip of water 2 miles long, wind- 



ing in and out of a bi^ marsh. The forest 
grew to the edge and game trails led to the 
water. At a clear spot of several acres the 
water was covered with lily-pads; and 
many of the succulent roots had been pulled 
up and partly eaten by moose. 

An hour passed; cautiously the boat was 
paddled in and out through the marsh. I 
sat in the bow with rifle across my knees; 
ready. A blue heron rose and flapped slow- 
ly away. Two ducks that we disturbed 
rose with a splash. Each time I had a sud- 
den chill, and thought of buck fever. 

"Deer; straight ahead!" Fred suddenly 
whispered. Fully *4 of a mile away, I saw 
my 1st deer, a black-eared doe. Then com- 
menced an exciting time. The guide pad- 
dled swiftly and noiselessly, nearer and 
nearer. The deer grew suspicious, cocked 
her ears, turned and looked at us. Fred 
stopped paddling and I was almost afraid 
to breathe. She was satisfied and began to 
feed. The instant her head went down, 
Fred began paddling Again and again 
she looked up, and our actions were re- 
peated. 

Finally I whispered to the guide to let 
me shoot, but he would not. Nearer and 
nearer until she threw up her head and was 
off like a flash, disappearing behind a pro- 
jecting point, and my opportunity was lost. 
Slowly Fred worked the canoe around the 
point. It was an exciting moment, for I 
knew the instant the bow turned the point, 
we should be in full view, and I must shoot 
quickly or not at all. I did not see the 
deer where I expected to, but farther back. 
I saw her going, and fired. ' You've hit 
her," my companion called out. We quick- 
ly reached the shore. He found no blood, 
but so many tracks he gave it up. " It was 
a hard shot," he said, trying to let me down 
easy. 

I was not satisfied, however, and wanted 
to see for myself. Just as I, too, had given 
it up, Fred called me, and there was my 1st 
big game, dead, with a bullet hole through 
the left shoulder. 

Starting back to camp, we had gone only 
a short distance, when the guide whispered, 
"There's your moose!" In a clearing at 
the water's edge was a cow moose and 2 
calves, feeding. To me, it was a wonderful 
sight. The canoe was pushed behind some 
alders, and I waited for the bull; but he did 
not come. Soon the cow winded us and 
moved off with her family. 

The days passed. We fished for trout, 
and still hunted in the daytime, and called 
for moose at night; but there was not an- 
other morning equal to the first. I killed 
my second deer, and altogether the luck 
seemed to be with me. Though my wife 
had to her credit the largest trout and a 
number of grouse, her big game was one 
hedgehog. She had seen a buck, but was 
so paralyzed at the sight, he disappeared 
before she could shoot. 




Isf' 



MRS. BEMIS AND HER MOOSE. 



Spinney was sent to the home camp for 
supplies, one day. It happened, very fortu- 
nately, for my wife and I hunted together 
the night her moose was called. At sun- 
down we started for the dead water, taking 
blankets with us, for the night was cold. 
My wife was to do the shooting, and I was 
to take a hand only if necessary. Wrapped 
in a blanket, she sat in the bow. The guide 
fastened the jack to the stick at her left, 
and she practiced at opening the shutter 
until she was able to do it noiselessly. 

Although we had called 4 nights, without 
success, an indefinable something seemed 
to whisper this would be our great night. 
The guide picked out a likely spot, pushed 
the bow of the canoe on the edge of the 
bog, facing up wind, where he could get 
away easily, took a drink of water to clear 
his throat, and picked up his moose horn. 

How that 1st call sounded on the still 
night air! It fairly startled me. The notes 
went out over the marsh and were echoed 
back to us from the surrounding hills. Any 
moose within 5 miles surely heard it. Fred 
gave the second call and then the last. We 
waited and listened, our ears strained to 
catch the slightest sound. Calling at inter- 
vals of 20 minutes, an hour passed and dark- 
ness settled. No answer, not a sound, save 
those created in imagination, and the occa- 
sional splash of beavers as they came out 
around us. 

Fred thought he heard a deer in the 
water, and paddled out to investigate. We 
had gone only a short distance when we 
were startled by a terrific crash behind us. 



Our bull was coming across the marsh, 
grunting at every step. I could hear the 
ring of his horns as they struck the trees, 
and the splashing as he stepped into 
water. Never had I heard anything like it. 

As the canoe moved nearer, every grunt 
sounded louder, until it seemed as if I could 
almost touch him. My wife tremblingly 
whispered she was " too frightened to 
shoot," and begged the guide not to go 
nearer. I whispered a word of encourage- 
ment I did not feel. 

When it is considered she was 8 feet 
nearer than I, and 18 nearer than the guide, 
and being rapidly pushed toward a snorting 
bull moose she could not see, it is no won- 
der she trembled. The old fellow stopped 
grunting and seemed to be going away. It 
was a critical moment. Fred picked up his 
horn, gave a little coaxing call, at which the 
bull came on again, grunting. 

" Open the jack," Fred ordered. At the 
words my wife recovered her nerve. She 
carefully laid her rifle on her lap and noise- 
lessly opened the jack. 

" I see his eyes," she whispered, 

" Shoot! Shoot! " I cried. She raised 
her rifle, aimed between his eyes and then 
said, aloud, in- her excitement, " That's too 
high." She calmly lowered her rifle, raised 
it again, aiming at his shoulder, which she 
could see dimly outlined, and fired. Throw- 
ing out the shell, she fired again, then 3 
times in quick succession in the direction 
of the noise made by the retreating moose. 

I did not think for a moment she had hit 
him; and when I heard him going away, I 



MY WIFE'S MOOSE. 



i'3 




HEAD OF MOOSE KILLED BY MRS. BEMIS. 

thought he was lost. Up to this time I had 
not seen him. I stood up in the canoe, in 
my anxiety to get a shot, and to this day I 
wonder how Fred kept it from upsetting. 



All was still. A brook emptied into the 
dead water at this spot, very shallow, with 
a mud bottom. Slowly the guide paddled 
up the brook, my wife throwing the light 
on shore; but we could not see anything of 
our game. Turning and coming back, clo^e 
to the shore, Fred lost his paddle and the 
canoe grounded in the soft mud. Fifteen 
feet from the bow, the moose suddenly 
loomed up like a huge spectre, and charged. 

In my dreams I even yet sometimes hear 
the guide's shrill command: "Fill him ! Fill 
him!" I can hear my wife's last shot, 
which broke the animal's leg and brought 
him down. I can see her throwing out 
imaginary shells for several minutes after 
her magazine was empty, the shot that 
broke his leg being her last. 

Using the moose horn for a paddle, the 
guide finally succeeded in getting the canoe 
off and we floated into deep water. After 
some minutes, all being quiet, Fred, pro- 
testing meanwhile, took us ashore. With 
jack in hand, we went carefully over the 
marsh until we came upon the moose, dead. 
Only 2 shots hit him; the first through the 
shoulder, and the last, a fortunate one, 
broke his leg. 




Rock ledge, on the Indian river, Florida, 
is a favorite place for Northern sportsmen. 
Quail and ducks abound; alligators are 
numerous and there is plenty of other 
game. 

The best sport, however, is fishing. The 
favorite in this line is trolling for weakfish 
or sea trout. A dozen fish in an hour, 
weighing iy 2 to 2 l / 2 pounds, is an every 
day affair; though occasionally a trout is 
taken weighing up to 10 pounds. 

The aim of most anglers is to secure one 
or more channel bass — for which the place 
is famous. Stopping at the New Rock 
Ledge hotel you can always find genial 



companions, who have made a practice of 
going there, for years past, to indulge in 
their favorite sport. The channel bass 
usually run from 15 to 20 pounds; but 
specimens up to 30 and even 40 pounds 
have been landed. 

The channel bass shown in the accom- 
panying photograph weighed, x /z hour after 
landing, 28 pounds and measured 44 inches. 
The bait used was dead mullet, the tackle 
was rod and reel, and nearly one hour was 
required in which to boat the big fish. Mr. 
Jos. L. Arguimbau, of Hackensack, N. J., 
was the fortunate angler. 

J. G. Ackerson. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY H. G. READING. 



LOOKING FOR TROUBLE. 

Awarded Twenty-sixth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY WM. ALLEN. 

END OF THE CRUISE OF '89. 
Awarded Thirteenth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

114 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY CAPT. JNO. S. LOUD, U. S. A. 

A FINE CATCH. 
Awarded Seventeenth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




a.-, 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY JOHN BOYD. 

A HIGH GRADE TUMBLE. 
Awarded Eleventh Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

"5 



IN THE GAULIES. 



D. C. BRADEN. 



November, 1895, found us on our an- 
nual hunting trip to the Gaulie mountains, 
of West Virginia, our party consisting 
of A. J. Braden, H. R. Nye, J. B. Eck- 
ford, Frank Blood, Jim Judson, Capt. Fee, 
B. Griesinger, McClellan Leonard and I. 
We met at Pittsburg and a short and pleas- 
ant ride, over the B. & O. and West Vir- 
ginia Central railways, landed us at Bev- 
erly. Then in 2 wagons, we drove 30 



At last came the long looked for and 
welcome rain; and the boys, with the ex- 
ception of Leonard and I went over to 
our hunting lodge, 3 miles away in the 
Gaulie mountain. The next day Leonard 
and I started down Elk river to look for 
turkeys. Leonard was about a quarter of a 
mile ahead of me, when rounding a bend 
in the river I saw a big buck, about 300 
yards away, coming out of the timber and 




VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF SPORT. 



miles up the Tiggert valley, between the 
Cheat and Rich mountains, to the foot of 
Middle mountain, where we stopped at the 
Hotel Marshall. Another drive of 11 miles 
and we were at the home of our old time 
friend and guide, H. B. Sharp, on Elk river. 

We killed 19 big gray squirrels and 
2 ruffed grouse, which we ate for break- 
fast next morning. The weather being dry 
and warm we spent several days hunting 
grouse and squirrels which we found very 
plentiful. We also located a big gang of 
wild turkeys, on Slaty Fork mountain. 

Hunting turkeys is great sport, and re- 
quires a deal of skill and good judgment, 
on the part of the hunter. We killed 11 on 
the trip. Several of these, with some squir- 
rels and grouse, are shown, with our Bill 
Nye, in a snap shot from Leonard's camera. 



making for the water, into which he 
plunged and started to wade down stream. 
I slipped 2 buck shot shells into my gun 
and the deer now being out of sight, behind 
the river bank, I made a quick run and got 
within about 45 yards of him, when he saw 
me and sprang out of the water. I cut 
loose on him, with the right barrel, and 
broke a leg. I then fired the left and tum- 
bled him over. He had a handsome pair 
of antlers, 5 points on one beam and 4 on 
the other. Leonard, when he heard the 
racket, started up the creek. He saw a deer 
running toward him and opened fire on it. 
At a distance of 30 yards he put several 
buck shot clear through it. One barrel did 
the business. It proved to be a large doe. 
We hung them up, with a turkey that 
had been killed the day before, and Leon- 



116 



A REMINISCENCE OF BUFFALO DA YS. 



117 



arc! exposed a plate on them, before we 
dressed them. 

The boys over at camp were in great 
luck, too. It began to snow, and soon the 
ground was covered with a good tracking 
snow. Deer proved plentiful and a number 
of bear trails were found, but no bear were 
killed. 

When the boys came over from camp 



they brought with them 5 deer they had 
killed. 

Not being market hunters, and having all 
the game we wanted, and sport enough to 
last a year, we turned our faces toward 
home. This was our sixth trip to the Gau- 
lies, in which time we have killed 2>7 deer, 
3 bears, 55 wild turkeys, and a large amount 
of smaller game. 



A REMINISCENCE OF BUFFALO DAYS. 



BY CAPT. H. ROMEYN, U. S. A. 



The plains of Western Kansas furnish a 
rich field for the fossil hunter. They have, 
in pre-historic ages, been the bed of a shal- 
low sea, and in the blue shale, which under- 
lies most of this area, and crops out in the 
sides of the wind and rain-swept buttes, the 
geologist and palaeontologist find many 
rare and valuable specimens. During the 
years in which I served in that region, sev- 
eral of the first scientists of the country 
paid visits to the sections lying about Forts 
Hayes and Wallace, and many of their dis- 
coveries were valuable. They generally 
came to the posts provided with letters or 
orders from Department Commanders, or 
from the Secretary of War, directing com- 
manding officers to furnish them with such 
escorts as could be spared, and the duty 
was one sought after by both officers and 
enlisted men. The professors were gener- 
ally genial men, good talkers, and ready to 
impart information to any one who wished 
it. One, a naturalist, who looked after the 
things of the present as well as of past 
ages, created a commotion at a dinner 
table one day, when a small snake, which, 
for want of a better place to confine it, he 
had placed in an inside pocket of his coat, 
and covered with his handkerchief, es- 
caped from it to the table, just as the com- 
pany had seated themselves. The ophidian 
was as- harmless as an antelope, but the 
stampede was complete, and the really 
strange and beautiful "sarpint" was mashed 
out of all proportions by the boot-heel of 
one of the gentlemen present before it 
could be recaptured by its owner. 

But " the champion bone-hunter," as he 
was designated by the soldiers, was a pro- 
fessor of palaeontology from one of the 
Eastern colleges, who was accustomed to 
make extended tours with classes of stu- 
dents of his favorite science; and who. ex- 
cept in the instance about to be related, 
had no use for any bones that did not ante- 
date Old Father Adam; and the further 
back they had existed, the better. Not 
wagon loads only, but carloads of fossils 
were found and shipped by him, and he was 



known to have worked for days, with a pick 
and spade, unearthing a single specimen. 

His first visit was made the next autumn 
after the events already related had oc-i 
curred. With a dozen or more of students, 
he had spent weeks in the valley of Snake 
river, in Idaho, and, on his way East, 
stopped at Fort Wallace, with 3 or 4 of his 
party. His time was limited, but he wished 
to take a look at the country, and to see a 
buffalo hunt, as he had not seen any of 
these animals in a wild state. They could 
be found within a few miles of the post, and 
the morning after his arrival 2 officers, with 
half a dozen mounted soldiers, reported as 
his escort for the hunt. His party was fur- 
nished with an ambulance for the trip, and 
I handed him a rifle and 40 rounds of am- 
munition. The students had their own 
Winchesters. He thanked me, but said he 
did not need the rifle. He " had no desire 
to do any shooting; was only going to look 
on," etc., but yielded on being told that no 
one was allowed to leave the post without 
being armed. 

The officers took seats with the party in 
the ambulance, for the time, leading their 
saddled horses, while the mounted enlisted 
men accompanied a wagon that was taken 
along to bring in the beef. Only a cursory 
examination of the rocky defiles was made, 
the savant deciding at once that they con- 
tained no fossils, and the party was soon 
near the head of one of the ravines, from 
which egress to the prairie above was prac- 
ticable for vehicles. A man sent ahead to 
reconnoitre, reported several small herds 
on the prairie not far away, and tightening 
their pistol-belts, and the " cinches " of 
their saddles, the officers threw their outer 
coats into the ambulance, and mounted for 
the run. The " fossil party " were told that 
they could see most of the chase from some 
rising ground half a mile ahead, to which 
the driver was directed to proceed. The 
visitors were also cautioned to keep a look- 
out for other game, which was probably in 
other ravines, and would run for the prairie 
as soon as it " winded " the hunters. 



n8 



RECREATION. 



As the mounted men reached the upland, 
probably 2,000 buffalo, in small herds, were 
seen, some of them not more than 200 yards 
away. 

The charge was ordered, and, " every 
man for himself," the hunters started. I 
kept up the chase till both my revolvers 
were emptied, and had dropped 3 bulls. I 
then pulled up to find myself alone, and 
more than a mile from the nearest of my 
friends. 

There was always one danger in running 
buffalo in the Indian country. The hunter, 
engrossed in the pursuit of his game, lost 
all idea of course or distance, and a run of 
4 or 5 miles was not an unusual thing. At 
the end of that the sportsman often found, 
himself alone on the prairie, with empty 
pistols and a tired steed, in a most defence- 
less state if suddenly attacked. I was soon 
joined by the other officers, and we waited 
for the wagon to come up and get our 




"WE FOUND THE TEAM ALL RIGHT AND 
THE PROFESSOR AT WORK." 

game, in the meantime scanning the ground 
along the horizon for some sign of the am- 
bulance. But we looked in vain, and as 
soon as the beef was loaded we retraced our 
steps in search of the Professor. Nearly 2 
miles back we met one of the party, his 
face wearing a disgusted look, as though 
he did not think much of buffalo hunting. 
To our inquiries about the others, he re- 
plied, — 

" I don't know where they are. The 
driver took us up to that place you pointed 
out, and just as we reached it a small herd 
came rushing up from the ravines, and ' the 
old man ' told us to get out and get a shot. 
As we jumped out another herd came 
along, and he told the driver to drive on, 
and left us out in the cold, and by that 
time the herd we had first seen had run out 



of reach. The last I saw of the team it was 
away off in that direction (pointing to the 
Southwest), and I think it was running 
away." 

Turning in the direction indicated, we 
galloped off in search of the lost man, and 
rode nearly 2 miles before, as much farther 
away, we saw the ambulance halted, and a 
man apparently at work on a carcass. Rid- 
ing up, we found the team all right, and the 
Professor at work. He was a sight! He had 
killed a young bull (as the driver told it), 
" had filled him too full of lead for him to 
carry." He had lost his hat, and in lieu 
of it had tied a white handkerchief about 
his head, — thrown off his coat, and, with a 
knife " hacked worse than 2 saws," and 
which had been used all the trip for digging 
fossils, he was trying to cut off the animal's 
head to take home as a trophy. His hands 
and arms were bloody, his face dripped 
with perspiration. In trying to wipe it 
away he had forgotten that his hands were 
bloody, and had stained his face, hair and 
handkerchief with gore, till he looked 
worse than a Chicago butcher. We sent 
the driver back to bring up the wagon, and 
then proceeded to assist in getting off the 
skin, as he said he must have it dressed 
and the head mounted. After we had re- 
turned to the post, had a bath, and the pro- 
fessor had cooled down, mentally, he began 
to think how he must have looked and 
acted, and after ! his return to the East it 
was soon a tabooed subject. The driver's 
story, told to his fellows, was couched in 
language more forcible than eloquent. 
Leaving out the expletives it was about as 
follows: 

" He wasn't goin' to shoot no buffalo! 
Oh, no! But after he got them young fel- 
lows out, he jest went plumb crazy, an' 
when about the third bunch of 'em run 
past, he poked his gun out past my head 
an' fired right over my mules, an' they went 
in spite of me. His hat blowed off, and I 
wanted to go back fur it, but he sung out 
not to mind his hat, but go on. And bime- 
by he banged away again, and then the buf- 
faler stopped, an' I began to circle 'round, 
and then the old fellow jumped out and 
was goin' to run right up to him; till I 
hollered that he'd git h'isted if he did, and 
then he jest stood off, and. pumped lead 
into him till he dropped. Talk about ' buck 
ager ' — if he didn't have ' buffaler fever ' 
I'm a tenderfoot." 

The Professor came back the next year, 
and with him came one of the same party. 
Scarcely had we shaken hands when he 
said, " Don't say buffalo to the old gentle- 
man — it is a sore subject." 



A SALT WATER BREEZE. 



GEORGE G. CANTWELL. 



" How about that trip to the Nisqually 
flats " — I looked around to see the famil- 
iar figure of Chauncey Potter beaming over 
the fence — " All right " I answered, " I'm 
ready any time you are." 

So a day or 2 later we had all our traps 
stowed away in his green boat and started 
down the Puyallup river for the Sound, 
then in and out among the pretty islands 
for the tide flats of the Nisqually river. 

The Puyallup was low and rapid, the 
12 mile ride to the mouth furnishing 
plenty of unexpected pleasures and excite- 
ment, now gliding rapidly along the smooth 
places among the tall firs — to be suddenly 
twisted into a strong eddy and stranded in 
a mass of drift-wood. While afloat it was 
one continual dodge to keep clear of the 
ugly snags, just below the surface, but we 
came out of it with a dry boat and no mis- 
hap. 

We had some difficulty in passing a queer 
lattice work of a fish trap the Siwashes had 
built across the river, in direct violation of 
the law. 

At the mouth of the river we came upon a 
number of fishermen catching salmon, 
with gill nets. 

We stopped at one camp to get a few 
strings of salmon eggs, for trout bait, and 
looked over the last catch — a boat load of 
fine fish, principally silver salmon, a few 
tyee salmon and a monster jack salmon, 
as long as a man and as trim and graceful, 
in outline, as any trout. 

Once on the salt water we made better 
time, and settled down to our 22 mile row, 
to be relieved by the sail when the wind 
favored us. 

We camped for the night a few miles 
around the bay from Tacoma. There is al- 
ways a novelty about the first night's camp 
of any trip, but our excitement finally died 
out with the fire and folding the flaps of the 
tent together we had but just quieted down 
when a disturbance on the beach caused us 
to investigate. The full moon showed a 
party of fishermen drawing a seine. We 
went out and watched them pull their net 
into shallow water. The fish, for there were 
thousands of herring in front of it. were 
frantic in their efforts to escape, lashing the 
water into a foam; but the fatal net had 
crowded them and there they were laid, sev- 
eral tons of them, on the sand. There were 
among them about a dozen salmon, a few 
dog fish, some of the curious little rat fish, 
with mouths full of sharp teeth, and a big 
sea' bullhead whose spread of fins, from all 
sides, would eclipse the rig of a racing 
yacht. 

Their catch was larger than the men could 



take care of and after their boat was loaded 
the half still remained on the beach where 
the receding tide had left them. 

We picked up what we could use and had 
herring for the next few days, as well as a 
hot skillet of them then and there that made 
us a delightful midnight lunch. 

The dead herring soon attracted a swarm 
of dog fish to the spot and the phosphores- 
cent streaks that criss-crossed through the 
water, in all directions, told the numbers of 
the hungry creatures that were moving 
about. What they left were devoured, in 
the morning, by a flock of gulls and terns. 

The next 3 days were spent among the 
different islands along the way. We took 
our time and loafed along, shooting a few 
ducks and ruffed grouse, and feasting on 
huckleberries. Occasionally we made a 
meal on clams or muscles. 

Salmon were continually jumping, some 
making splendid leaps of 4 or 5 feet into the 
air and often keeping it up for several ^ods, 
leaving a long chain of glittering splashes 
behind. Porpoises and seal often came in 
view. We were unable to get a shot at a 
porpoise but killed several seal, which sank 
before they could be reached with the boat. 

One night we camped on the soft sand of 
the beach, just beyond the high tide Jine, 
and were no sooner comfortably settled 
inside the tent, perusing " Huckleberry 
Finn," than we noticed the sand was alive 
with a queer little jumping insect. They 
were all coming to the head of the tent, 
where the lantern sat. They were more the 
shape of a shrimp than anything else I can 
recall; were about Yz inch long, with a 
stubby sort of tail that they kept curled un- 
derneath them. It only required a sudden 
straightening out of this member to send 
them a foot or more; and they were flip- 
ping about all over the blankets and be- 
tween them. Although they did not seem 
inclined to taste of us they were a terrible 
nuisance and the only wav we could get 
any peace at all was to crawl under the 
covers, kill what we could catch and let the 
remainder roam about the tent at will. 

One morning, after an early start, the low 
land of the Nisqually flats appeared, in a 
break in the fog that the sun had not yet 
melted away. With the sight of the flats 
came the whistle and roar of the frightened 
water fowl that drift about, in enormous 
flocks, over the shallow waters. They rose 
on all sides and wheeled by, well cut of 
range, only to settle down again where they 
might feed undisturbed. 

We decided to try the South side of the 
flats first, so we were soon at the Mouth of 
McAllister creek, up which we rowed a 



119 



120 



RECREATION. 



short distance and found an old lean-to, 
made of cedar shakes, that had been used 
by lumbermen in getting out timber. This 
was an ideal spot to camp on, so we soon 
had the grub box and blankets under the 
roof, the tent spread over one side and the 
sail over the other, leaving the front open 
for a fire place. 

Grouse were plentiful in the brush, be- 
hind, and the duck shooting, on the marsh, 
was all that could be asked. Plenty of trout 
were everywhere in the creek. 

The first night's slumber, on our bed of 
boughs, was disturbed by a pair of mink 




"PLENTY OF TROUT WERE EVERYWHERE 
IN THE CREEK." 

that came in and got mixed up in an empty 
paper bag. One would hardly imagine a 
bit of loose paper could produce such a 
racket; but a big rubber boot, that dropped 
into their midst, drove them off and all was 
quiet again, save for the dismal hoot of a 
great horned owl that took up his stand 
just behind our camp. With almost clock 
like regularity, snap! snao! would go his 
bill, followed by deep " hoo — hoo's " and, 
although it bothered us some at first we 
soon got used to it. 

Daylight was sure to find us up — gener- 
ally on the marsh for the morning flight. 



We were always rewarded by a string of 
birds and an astonishing appetite for break- 
fast. 

The tide rose and fell 6 feet or more, in 
the creek, and mornings, when the banks 
were full, large numbers of seal would 
go drifting up stream, to come back a 
few hours later, in bunches of a dozen 
or more, barking, diving, and splashing 
about, having a high old time of it. But let 
a man appear on the bank and all this hilar- 
ity suddenly ceased. Then, sinking down to 
their eyes, they would glide swiftly along, 
ready to dive at the least suspicion of 
danger. They would then reappear half a 
mile below. 

One of the brilliant things I did was to 
row into the middle of the marsh at day- 
light, one morning, and allow the tide to 
run out and leave the boat in the mud — this, 
too, on an empty stomach. Both boats were 
soon full of water, and a cold wind coming 
in from the bay, but the only thing to do 
was to make tracks for camp. I went to the 
head of the creek, to a bridge, where I got 
a drink of fresh water and a few green ap- 
ples to eat; then down the other side, com- 
ing into camp, about 4 in the afternoon, 
completely done up. 

Rather than take the long tedious walk 
around again, for the boat, I had concluded 
to swim the creek and bring the boat back, 
now that the tide had set in; but Potter, 
by a lucky chance, found a piece of a raft, 
paddled across and was soon back with 
the boat. 

The relief at the thought of not being 
obliged to swim the ice cold creek, that 
afternoon, was a balm that soon put me 
to sleep. It needed only a good smell of 
the salt sea air, next morning, to put me 
on my feet again. 

We passed the best part of a week here; 
shooting ducks and grouse and catching 
elegant strings of trout. These took the 
bait of salmon eggs with an eagerness that 
was fatal to them. They traveled in little 
schools, with the tide, and when we found 
them it was no trouble to fill a basket. 

During the last few days we laid in a 
supply of fish and fowl for the folks in 
town, and then set sail on the homeward 
tack. A few hours later we were again 
sleeping on feather beds. 



Now doth the little busy bee 
Add much unto the woes 

Of Johnny, footbare on the lea, 
By getting 'twixt his toes. 

— Indianapolis News. 



OLD FORT SMITH. 



MAJ. E. R. P. SHURLY, U. S. A. 



In 1865, after the close of the war, the 
Government authorities had leisure to. take 
up Indian affairs. For some time the dif- 
ferent tribes had been in an unsettled state. 

Rich gold mines had been developed in 
the vicinity of Virginia City, and a general 
stampede of thousands of prospectors fol- 
lowed. In a short time the place grew from 
a straggling hamlet to a town of consider- 
able size. Now the route, West of Green 
river and the mountains, to Virginia City, 
was roundabout and difficult. There was 
another road, however, via Fort Laramie, 
up the Eastern slope of the Big Horn 
mountains. Most of the distance was 
through one of the finest countries in the 
world. Good grass, game in plenty, and 
magnificent scenery; but there was one 
drawback to this route — the Indians. 

The Sioux and Kiowas objected to hav- 
ing the last of their hunting-grounds dese- 
crated by the whites. Here were found 
buffalo in thousands, elk, antelope and 
bear. The country was fruitful, in season, 
with wild plums, grapes and berries; while 
the streams were alive with trout. Not- 
withstanding the objections of the Indians, 
the authorities at Washington decided to 
take possession, establish posts and open a 
shorter route to the Gallatin valley. 

The 18th infantry, to which I had the 
honor to be appointed, was stationed at 
Louisville, enjoying peace and the hos- 
pitality of that pleasant city. One day it 
received an order to repair to the " land 
of the Dacotahs " without delay; there to 
establish the necessary posts to protect 
emigration, and to open a route to Vir- 
ginia City, Montana. 

Why the 18th should have been selected, 
which had only recently returned from the 
front, was to us a problem, unless it was 
because the commanding officer was not 
in the graces of Secretary Stanton. The 
story was told that the Secretary, on open- 
ing another letter from our Colonel, who 
was after a " soft snap " in the East, turned 
to his clerk and demanded: " Which is the 
next place to hell to send a regiment? " 
" To the Powder river country," was the 
reply. 

'' Then order the 18th infantry there at 
once," commanded Stanton. 

It would have been well if the old 18th 
with its 3 battalions had gone; but before it 
could start, it was divided into 3 regiments. 
The 2d battalion was numbered the 27th, 
and sent to the Powder river country. This 
regiment did a great deal of fighting; and 
about 200 officers and men are buried at 
Forts Reno, Phil. Kearney and C. F. 
Smith, sacrifices to an impotent Indian pol- 
icy on the part of the Government. 



In 1866 not a wagon train passed up or 
down that did not have to fight its way. 
The 27th established the 3 posts mentioned. 
I was attached to the column of Gen. John 
E. Smith, who, in 1867, with 350 men, left 
Fort Sedgwick the 2d of May, arriving at 
Fort Phil. Kearney July 3d. The General 
was a gallant officer. He had made his 
mark while commanding a division in the 
Army of the Tennessee. 

When Gen. John E. Smith's column, as 
it was called, reached Fort Phil Kearney, 
it was suggested to the General that an old 
boiler and engine, then at the post, could 
be used toward building a saw-mill at Fort 
Smith. These were parts of a mill burned 
by the Indians. Accordingly, the quarter- 
master, Gen. Daudy, caused a 6-wheel 
truck to be made for transporting the en- 
gine. Drawn by 12 yoke of oxen, it was, 
after much trouble, hauled to Smith. Then 
it took all the expert mechanics in the 
ranks to get the thing into shape. 

It was a wonderful mill when completed. 
All of the running gear wa^ made of wood. 
An original saw-mill, surely; but by its aid 
the question of lumber for the new bar- 
racks was settled. 

Old Fort C. F. Smith was situated on 
one of the most pleasing sites in Wyoming. 
It was built on a bluff 500 yards from the 
Big Horn river, and a mile above the great 
canyon that extends Westward 100 miles, 
to the Stinking Water river. Fort Smith 
was one of 3 posts built to hold the Indians 
in check. It was a stockade post, and once 
stood an assault against a force of Indians 
20 times the strength of the. garrison. Af- 
ter our arrival, the old wooden barracks 
were replaced by buildings of adobe, the 
bricks being made by the men, the lumber 
sawed at the mill. 

The Indians were bad. The Government 
did not mean war, but the Sioux and Arap- 
ahoes and Kiowas did. They lost no op- 
portunity to let us know it. 

We were then considered as out of the 
world; and were so far as getting news 
from the East was concerned. Months 
intervened between mails. Wagon trains 
were strongly guarded, and even then there 
was constant fighting with the large bands 
of Indians, who took advantage of any inat- 
tention of the escort to li jump the train." 

The garrison a the fort was most of the 
time in a state of siege. A man going from 
the stockade to the river took chances. 
Occasionally our friends the Crows (Abs- 
racas) to the number of 300 or 400, would 
camp near us. Then we had lively times. 
Their old enemies, the Sioux, would come 
in to give them a fight; and the garrison 
would look on. 



122 



RECREA TION. 



Old Smith at times was- a monotonous 
post. The sun would rise out of the plains 
and disappear over the mountains. Slowly 
the days passed. Game was abundant. 
From the top of the stockade could be seen 
buffalo, elk, antelope and sometimes bear. 
Small game was equally plenty, but it was 
risking one's life to hunt. Many took the 
chances, however, so we were usually pro- 
vided with game. During the winter of 



'66 the garrison lived mainly on corn. No 
train came through, while the Indians, 
numbering thousands, had their winter 
quarters on the Little Horn river. 

I have not been in that country since 
1868, but I am told the remains of the old 
post are visible amid the civilization that 
has sprung up around it. The valley of 
the Big Horn now blossoms as the rose, 
and all is peace. 



IN THE LAND OF THE SHAG. 



F. J. CHURCH. 



A glance at a map of the United States 
shows the extreme Northwestern part of 
our country to be a peninsula, lying be- 
tween Puget sound and the Pacific ocean. 
Rugged mountain ranges practically cover 
this whole region. The coast line, mouths 
of rivers, and a few prominent peaks, are 
correct on the maps; but the interior is 
an unknown country. The greater ranges 
are on the North and East, but many long 
spurs run down to the Pacific, jutting into 
the ever tumbling waters in the shape of 
precipitous promontories of black and red- 
dish rock. These rugged cliffs have been 
worn into fantastic shapes by the action of 
the waves. Scattered here and there in the 
ocean, often 5 miles or more seaward, stand 
portions of former coast lines that have 
resisted the assaults of old Ocean. These 
small rock islands, often of much greater 
height than their horizontal extent, as well 
as the promontories, are dwelling places 
for sea fowl of all descriptions, but prin- 
cipally of the red-breasted cormorants, 
known as shags. 

They are peculiar birds, in appearance, 
in habits, and in odor — particularly the 
latter. Winter and summer, storm or calm, 
thousands of them may be seen sitting on 
some bleak rock, just beyond the full force 
of the billows, or flying with their yard of 
neck stretched out, their comparatively 
small wings flapping in an absurdly rapid 
manner. 

Three of us had spent nearly 2 months 
knocking about in the interior of the 
peninsula, packing our outfits on our 
backs; so right glad we were to hear the 
roar of the ocean, and feel the cold sea 
breezes. The giant Western forests are 
beautiful and wonderful, but when one is 
tramping among trees that grow as close 
together as the bushes in a thicket, with 
tops 200 to 300 feet in the air, the view is 
necessarily limited. The ocean beach, 
therefore, which gave us plenty of room, 
was a welcome change. 



Having rested over Sunday at the Gort 
agency, at the mouth of the Quinault ,we 
started out refreshed on Monday. After 
wading streams and climbing rocks and 
windfalls, the smooth, hard ocean beach 
seemed better than any pavement we had 
ever trod. 

Just North of Quinault, a long promon- 
tory juts out into the ocean — Pt. Granville. 
Through this a hole has been worn by the 
waves, some 15 feet in diameter. Clamber- 
ing over the slippery rocks that form the 
floor of this double-ender cave, we were 
gladdened by the sight of a long stretch of 
beach that would have put to shame the 
finest " pike " in the land. It is 3 miles 
long, nearly 500 feet wide, at low tide, hard 
and so nearly level that water stands in 
shallow pools all over it. 

The shag were everywhere, walking the 
beach, sitting on the rocks and cliffs, and 
flying about in all directions. To the West- 
ward, a constant stream of them were flying 
up and down the coast. We were guilty 
of shooting a number of them with our 
rifles; but they offered such exceptional 
marks, and made such absurd haste to get 
away when not hit — which was usually the 
case — that we could not resist the tempta- 
tion. 

The coast, from the mouth of the Quin- 
ault to Cape Flattery, is peculiar in its char- 
acteristics, in part decidedly dangerous. 
While there may be a quarter of a mile of 
beach at low tide, when the tide is in, there 
is no beach at all — the long giant rollers 
from the Pacific dash against the foot of 
the cliffs that everywhere fringe the coast. 

After plodding steadily onward for an 
hour or so, we saw with some apprehen- 
sion that the tide was running in rapidly. 
Off we started at the highest speed a long 
race and 60-pound packs would allow. Our 
object was, to make the mouth of the Raft 
river, where we could wait for the ebb tide, 
and get fresh water. Toward the end, mat- 
ters got entirely too interesting for com- 



IN THE LAND OF THE SHAG. 



123 



fort. We were constantly wading through 
the tail end of breakers, while occasionally 
a big one would cover us from head to 
foot; once or twice thumping us against 
the rocks. At last Castle rock, which juts 
up out of the beach immediately to the 
South of the Raft, was seen. With glad- 
dened hearts we pushed forward on the final 
spurt, reaching the sand dune, above high 
water, none too soon. A big fire of drift- 
wood dried our garments, while copious 
draughts of brackish tea warmed us. 

When the tide receded, we crossed the 
Raft in a small canoe, which was found 
behind a log. The mouth of the Queeto 
was reached at dusk. Here a crowd of 
dirty, disagreeable looking savages gath- 
ered around us, all jabbering at once. We 
wished to cross the river that evening, to 
have no delay in the morning; but we 
could not persuade any of these fellows to 
pole us over for less than 6 bits (75 cents). 
This we regarded as an imposition, as the 
distance was under 200 feet. We tried to 
bluff them by preparing to make camp, in- 
tending to borrow a canoe — when they had 
retired. They evidently knew exactly what 
was in our minds, for 'they carried all the 
poles and paddles into their shacks, then 
hauled the canoes up high on the pebbly 
beach. 

One miserable specimen of a man, robed 
in a single tattered blanket that was off 
more than it was on, stood around and 
chattered until we almost thought an 
Egyptian mummy was haranguing us on 
the deeds of his forefathers. We finally 
decided to give this ancient mariner his 
price if he would land us on the other side 
where there was fresh water. Once across, 
we ceased to be the suppliants, and when 
the ancient gentleman ' was unable to 
change $1, we simply shrugged our shoul- 
ders, told him we were excessively grieved, 
but could not help it. He hopped around 
in an awful state of mind; finally seizing a 
piece of bacon and an ax, and starting for 
his canoe. He was promptly grabbed by 
the long hair and yanked to the ground. 
Then he became very humble, telling us he 
would take " ictas " (odds and ends) in- 
stead of the " chickamin." We finally com- 
promised by giving him 30 cents and 2 
pounds of bacon. 

About 3 in the morning we awoke to 
find the entire camp under water, the tide 
having come in at a tremendous rate. Pots 
and pans were floating around in what, to 
a spectator, would have been a ludicrous 
fashion. When the sun appeared we found 
that the old reprobate of the day before 
had come back in the night and had stolen 
all of our bacon. As there was absolutely 
nothing to do but to grin and bear it, we 
made a breakfast of smoked salmon, 
" choke-dog," and tea; then shouldered our 
packs. 

Now fast progress was made along the 



smooth, hard beach. Again we were forced 
to follow an obscure trail over the cliffs, 
through salal brush 15 feet high, to get 
around some promontory. At Klalops 
creek, 4 miles North of the Queeto, we met 
a man named Brown, noticeable principally 
for his whiskers, which reached nearly to 
his knees. 

Brown was decidedly hard of hearing, 
and apparently thought every one else was 
afflicted with a similar complaint; for, al- 
though only a few inches from him, he 
roared as if he were trying to speak a ship 
in the offing. Paying no attention to our 
salutation, he walked up to us in a threat- 
ening sort of way, then bellowed: 

" Young men, do you know what you are 
standing on?" Not knowing whether he 
spoke of sacred ground, or wished to in- 
timate that we were on the edge of eternity, 
we jumped back and looked at the ground 
under our feet. Seeing nothing but some 
long, reddish streaks of sand, we answered 
in the negative. With dramatic gesticula- 
tions, he howled: "You are standing on 
gold. Wherever you see that ruby sand, 
there is gold." As we had just tramped 
over some 25 miles of it, we were not par- 
ticularly impressed, simply advising him to 
" get a hustle on him and start to digging." 
He told us he and his sons were staking 
out claims; so we bade him adieu, wishing 
him luck. 

As we were moving off, he yelled: " Say, 
do you boys want to kill an elk?" This 
query brought us to an abrupt halt, for it 
interested us more than possible gold 
mines on the Pacific beach. 

He told us there was a big herd of elk 
2 miles up the creek; so we walked to his 
ranch, left our packs, and started on the 
hunt. Our friends the shags were, as usual, 
all around us, a long stream of them going 
up and down the creek. It seemed queer 
to be hunting elk with these sea-birds flying 
about. 

If I ever have a particular grudge against 
anyone, I shall advise him to go up Klalops 
creek hunting. Between swamps, dense 
thickets of poisonous devil's clubs, and 
long stretches of salal jungles, that no man 
could force a way through without an ax, 
we had an awful time, being over 2 hours 
in making a mile. Sitting on a log, mop- 
ping perspiration, and resting, we nearly 
decided to turn back. Roland said he had 
not lost any jobs like this, while Frank 
thought, being so close to the clams, the 
elk were probably fishy, and therefore we 
did not want them. After puffing at our 
pipes, we felt better, and decided to go an- 
other half mile anyway. 

We had not gone over 200 yards when a 
cracking in the brush attracted our atten- 
tion. Looking in that direction, we saw 
a big cow elk standing under a hemlock, 
flapping her big ears to keep off the flies. 
Near her was a small bull, while farther 



124 



RECREA TION. 



off we saw 3 more cows and 2 calves. We 
wanted meat alone, as it would have been 
impossible to pack antlers; so, drawing 
lots for the shot, we knocked over the 
yearling bull. Cutting off as much of the 
meat as we could carry, we blazed trees in 
the neighborhood, so Brown could find the 
game. 

The remaining elk did not appear to 
mind us or the shot; several being still 
in sight when we turned back. 

Brown was surprised and pleased at our 
good fortune. I very much doubt if he 
knew the elk were there; although if he 
did not, it was a strange coincidence. As 
it was too late to make the Hoh that night, 
we spread our blankets in a hay-mow, on 
a small flat near the creek, and enjoyed 



well earned repose. On the morrow we 
reached the Hoh without particular in- 
cident. 

There we found a picturesque Indian vil- 
lage, peopled with the finest looking Si- 
washes we had seen; though not many of 
them would have taken prizes in a beauty 
show. One of the head men, Hoh William, 
treated us very generously indeed. He was 
a good Samaritan after the miserable little 
scamp on the Queeto. 

I asked Hoh William if he ever ate shags; 
to which he replied: " Yes, they are just as 
good as crow or cranes; " a statement we 
were unable to contradict. 

As curiosity and a desire to rest kept us 
several days at the mouth of the Hoh, I 
will leave the 3 tramps there for the present. 



FISHING IN THE MOUNTAINS OF MARYLAND. 



L. L. LITMAN. 



Early one morning, in August last, our 
party drove out toward the mountains. 
We were 2 sisters, a brother-in-law and I, 
and were leaving the hot and dusty city 
for a cooler atmosphere, and a few days' 
bass fishing. Our destination was Friends- 
ville, Maryland. We took advantage of the 
morning to make the drive of 28 miles. 
The horses seemed as anxious to be going 
as we were, for they trotted to the foot of 
the mountain, 3 miles distant, at a 3 minute 
gait. For the next hour the road took a 
winding course up Chestnut ridge, a spur 
of the Allegheny mountains, for a distance 
of 3 miles, to the summit. 

Here we stopped for a breathing spell, 
and to look back over the valley, 1,000 feet 
below. Then down, and up, until we had 
gone 17 miles over the old National road. 
This was built by the Government, in 1818, 
and until 1852 was the highway for trade, 
and the mails, between the East and the 
West. Henry Clay, Jackson, Harrison, 
Polk and other distinguished men were 
familiar figures to dwellers along the road, 
in their time. Fort Necessity, and the 
grave of General Braddock, may be seen 
from the roadside. 

At length, we saw the river hills, then 
in the valley below the Raging " Yough," 
wending its way through the little village 
of Friendsville. Away beyond a white 
speck nestled among the giant oaks and 
maples. It was our summer home. We 
were soon pleasantly settled in our cot- 
tage, and then followed golden days of fish- 
ing and of rest. 

The Youghiogheny is here a mountain 
Stream, clear, and pure; its waters, rushing 



and tumbling over a rocky bed, make a 
perfect home for black bass. I had the 
good fortune to spend several weeks of 
last summer along this stream, fishing 
when the spirit moved me, and it moved 
me often. Having the advantage of being 
able to wait for the best weather and water, 
I caught enough bass for our table at Bear 
creek. 

My experience does not warrant an at- 
tempt to advise any particular time to fish 
in the Youghiogheny, for I have taken 
bass there in May, June, July, August, Sep- 
tember, and October. However, if I had 
but 2 weeks of the summer to spare, I 
should choose August. Being «but one of 
a number who fish this stream, I should 
judge that hundreds, and perhaps thou- 
sands of bass were taken from it, each sum- 
mer. 

One should not go there expecting to 
fill his creel in an hour, or even in a day. 
Bass are plentiful enough, however, for 
anglers who are after real sport and who 
are not out to kill as many fish as possible. 

There are 2 sides to most fishing excur- 
sions: the bright and the dark. The bright 
begins days or weeks before the date of the 
contemplated trip. You go to bed each 
night thinking, and may be dreaming of it. 
Fishing clothes, minnows, and lunch are 
finally made ready, the night before the 
start, to be picked up when you are called 
in the morning. An early start is every- 
thing, for that is when the fish are feeding 
and are most likely to bite. As you wend 
your way through the field, and up the 
river, the bracing air, the picturesque sur- 
roundings, the thought of eating your 



FISHING IN THE MOUNTAINS OF MARYLAND. 



I2 5 



lunch on sonic big rock, in the middle of 
the stream, and more than all, the thought 
of making a fine catch — all these and a hun- 
dred other pleasures make you forget the 
laborious return trip. 

The laborious return trip! I was pictur- 
ing it in my mind as on the dark side. Let 
us see if it is. A few miles from home, 
tired, wet, and hungry. Your fish, basket, 
minnow-bucket, wet clothes and heavy 
shoes pulling you down; now wading the 
river, picking you,r way through laurels, 
over logs and rocks, with perhaps an oc- 
casional fall on the smooth bowlders; then 
home, a steaming supper, and to bed. 
" Hard work, and we will never go again," 
we say. The next morning, however, finds 
us seining minnows preparatory to another 
trip. So it is, and always will be. The dark 
side? Come to think of it there is none. 
It dwells only in imagination, for when 
memory takes its flight to other days, these 
2 sides blend brightly into one. 

Some days, when I tire of near surround- 
ings, I get on the train at Friendsyille, ride 
2^2 miles to Manon lands and walk a mile 
or so up the tram road that follows along 
the river. The scenery is picturesque: the 
river has more fall, making many pools; 
and bass are more plentiful than below. 
Then down to the river, with my Bristol 
steel rod, and usual trimmings, to give the 
finny tribe of the Youghiogheny an argu- 
ment; fishing first those places that can be 
reached from the shore, before going into 
the water. Without wading you cannot 
hope to be successful. It is well feo note the 
places where the large fish are li*kely to be. 
Then cast the tempting bait; let it sink to 
a depth of 2 or 3 ieet, and as you lead it 
here and there, should you lure from his 
haunts and hook a 2 pound bass, it will 
behoove you to use your finest art to land 
him. When you get a strike, out runs the 
line, your prize seeking the deepest part of 
the pool. Not relishing the barb, with a 
sudden plunge, he darts along, the reel 
making sweet music all the while. He 
shows his glistening sides, then, resisting, 
still, allows you to reel him in, and the 
struggle and excitement are over. 

You are thinking of a tale to be told of 
his capture, when you are again awakened 
from your reverie by the whirr of the reel. 
Ah, another. No! he hardly bends the rod. 
Gently he is disengaged from the hook' and 
thrown back. Let your work and sport be 
for a few large fish. They are worth many 
small ones. 

Of the many fishing excursions to the 
Youghiogheny, one of 2 hours, with a 
friend at Frederick's Dam, is often brought 
to mind. We went one evening in August, 
just at twilight. While we sat on the bank 
enjoying a lunch, the moon rose above the 
hill, shedding a silvery splendor over the 
valley. W r e could see the bass rising to the 
surface, making little swirls in the still 



water. After fishing 2 hours, we waded 
ashore with 17 bass. Within an hour, we 
were home and in bed, lulled to sleep by 
the murmurings of Bear creek. 

One who has fished during the day only, 
has yet a new experience to undergo. To 
move along in the semi-darkness, feeling 
your way over the rocks, you must be 
something of a gymnast to escape a wet- 
ting. Trees, logs, and rocks assume gro- 
tesque figures in the shadowy foreground. 
The noises of the day have given place to 
those of the night. Bats flutter overhead, 
with soft whirr of wings, uncomfortably 
close, at times, occasionally striking rod 
or line; while from some neighboring pine, 
on the hillside, come the doleful notes of 
the owl and the whippoorwill. 

Flowing into the Youghiogheny river 
are 15 or 20 tributaries; Bear creek is the 
largest. Its source is a small spring, in the 
Maryland hills, at an elevation of 2,000 feet 
above the sea. As it rushes down the 
mountain, numerous small creeks, clear and 
cold, flow into it. Here brook trout are 
found. In times past this stream abounded 
with them, but during the last year the de- 
velopment of timber resources along its 
course, has almost spoiled trout fishing. 
The forest is being cut down; saw-mills 
have been erected on one of the branches, 
and the deadly sawdust turned into the 
stream. To catch the logs, dams have been 
built, while dynamite was used to clear the 
creek of projecting rocks. So, during fresh- 
ets, thousands of saw logs are sent rushing 
down the stream to be piled in a jam at the 
mill, at the mouth of J;he creek. 

In spite of all this, trout may still be 
taken in the branches above the mills. 
Sawdust does not appear to affect bass. 
They run up the creek, from the river, oc- 
cupying the largest holes and growing fat 
on the minnows, mullets, and cray-fish. 

I was enjoying Bear creek breezes last 
July, when a party from Altoona, Pa., came 
to visit us. They had been looking forward, 
all winter, for this 2 weeks' outing. When 
the time arrived for their coming, my min- 
novv box was in the creek, filled and ready. 
My visitors brought with them a trunk full 
of photo apparatus and fishing tackle, but 
this world is full of disappointments. It 
was the summer of their discontent. The 
pleasures they expected in fishing, and the 
views they would take back, picturing the 
scenes and happy hours, were dreams that 
did not materialize. The sun hid himself 
the day they arrived, and the rain de- 
scended thereafter, for 10 days. The 
streams rose to a height never before 
known. Thousands of saw logs, parts of 
bridges and drift of every kind filled the 
streams. It was a beautiful sight but. poor 
comfort for the disappointed sportsmen, 
who had looked and hoped for better 
things. 

Determined that our visitors should at 



126 



RECREA TION. 



least have a taste of fish, I went one day to 
the river, when the water was at the highest, 
and with worms surprised myself by catch- 
ing 3 goo'd sized bass, in 4 feet of water, 
directly over a country road 

The day came for the return of our 
friends, just as the waters were falling. The 
next day the sun was shining as brightly as 
ever; the water fell rapidly, and I was 
alone at a time when I least desired to be 
so. There was fine sport with bass, in creek 
' and in river, after the waters fell. My 
journal tells me of 50 caught in Bear creek, 
and of many others taken from the Yough- 
iogheny. I have in mind one beauty, 
captured in Bear creek August 2, measur- 
ing 13% inches. 

The evening of August 26th found me 



and a companion standing waist deep in the 
river, in a pool. It was an ideal evening 
for fishing — the kind that did not come 
again during our stay. A warm South 
breeze came gently down the river, bring- 
ing hundreds of small flies — tempting bits 
to the bass, which were rising in all parts of 
the pool. The fish bit savagely for a while, 
and did not criticise our mullets. They 
did not care, seemingly, whether the bait 
was dead or alive. In 2 hours, we caught 
32 bass, and quit. 

The time' for our return to town came 
too soon, but we went back healthy and 
contented, taking with us the memory of 
a happy outing, and vowing the next sum- 
mer should find us again in the mountains 
of Maryland. 



CAMPED IN THE CANYON. 



JAMES HANKS. 



Wake ye, and punch up the fire, Bill, 

Let's have jest a little more light; 
I am tired enough but try as I will 

I can't go to sleep to-night. 
My thoughts have strayed out of sight, 

And I can't jest round 'em in; 
So I'll spin ye a yarn — 'twixt now and day- 
light. 

And now, while ye smoke I'll begin. 



Together we've braved the storms and the 
flood, 
Tryin' to find dirt that would pay; 
And at night we've slept like babes in the 
wood, 
And renewed our search the next day. 
But to-night something tells me thar's 
comin' a change; 
That we'll soon quit hunting for ore, 
And Bill, ye'll soon be alone on the range — 
Old Jim won't be with ye no more. 



For to-night as I lay here countin' the 
stars, 
Tryin' hard to get sleepy again, 
I tuck my back trail o'er a long stretch of 
years, 
And I seed what a failure I've been. 
Up from the dark, lonely canyon there 
came 
The roar of the falls and the rills, 
And it sounded to me exactly the same, 
As the wheels in the old Woodbine mills. 



And there came to my ears, 'bove the sound 
of the mill, 
The voices of children — and then, 
They passed, one by one, right before me, 
Bill, 
And renewed their glad laughter again. 
And out of the darkness there came to my 
gaze, 
(Now drop your pipe Bill — and breathe 
sorter low) 
The face of another, I knew in those days, 
■ And had loved in the long, long ago. 

Her hair was fast growing gray; I could 
see 
And — ah — how the time flies! 
Thar — smoke away Bill — no — never mind 
me; 
I — I — jist got some smoke in my eyes. 
I have seed the old mill so oft in my 
dreams, 
Where the river runs deep, and so still; 
And Bill, my happiest days — it seems, 
Were passed at the Woodbine mill. 

So when I have throwed my last lariat, 

And shovelled my last pan of ore, 
And a paper that reads — " this prospect to 
let" 
Is nailed to my old cabbin door; 
Bill plant your old pard where the violets 
grow, 
On the banks where the river runs still; 
And I'll be sung to sleep by the rumblings 
low 
Of the dear old Woodbine mill. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



BIG GAME IN COLORADO. 
REV. S. N. M'ADOO. 

The heart of the woods, the sinuous bank 
of a stream, the margin of a lake in the for- 
est, signs of wild game, a chorus of wolves' 
voices — these things have always had a 
greater fascination for me than the thor- 
oughfares of great cities. When, therefore, 
the mountains of Colorado were decided 
upon as the scene of my vacation last year, 
the idea was much to my taste. 

A Winchester rifle, 45-90, a field-glass 
and a camera were carried. If, with such 
an outfit, a man can not have a good time 
in the mountains, it is not the fault of the 
mountains. There must be something 
wrong with the man. 

In Denver I learned that Steamboat 
Springs, in Routt county, was a good place 
for big game. So I took the train to Wol- 
cott, and thence the stage to Steamboat, 
82 miles North, where we arrived the sec- 
ond evening. 

The next morning I got a saddle-horse 
and started for the mountains. Whether it 
was the roughness of the broncho, or the 
altitude, or both together, was not clear, 
but I had not gone far till I began to lose 
all interest in life. There I was in the 
heart of the game country, with the moun- 
tains about me, lifting their purple heads 
to Heaven — enough to put a man into rapt- 
ures; but my miserable stomach began to 
" buck,'" so I beat a retreat, ingloriously, 
to the hotel. 

That afternoon as I was sitting in the 
office talking to a hunter, who had, in his 
time, killed 16 bear, a good-hearted fellow 
thrust his head into the room and said: 
" A few of us are going out a mile or so; 
don't you want to go along? " 

An invitation I was glad to accept. I 
asked the bear slayer if he thought I might 
see a deer. "Well, hardly so near town; 
but then you might," was the reply. 

I took my rifle and joined the party. 
The others were after fish and birds. I 
separated from them and, with much toil 
and perspiration, climbed to the top of a 
hill. So far nothing had been seen but 
here and there a few tracks, or the place 
where a deer had lain down. 

When descending through a quaking asp 
thicket, I looked over the edge of a ridge, 
down into a valley. To my surprise and 
gratification there was a young buck. I 
watched him as he indolently brushed a fly 
from his flank. He was too far, but was 
coming nearer. I waited, but fear not with 
the calmness that befits a crisis. I soon 
lifted my head above the ridge again. This 
time he looked me full in the face, perhaps 



150 yards away. " Now's your time! " 
thought I. The next instant the stillness 
was broken by the voice of the rifle. 

Just here it would be very gratifying to 
tell the readers of Recreation the "deer 
dropped instantly, never knowing what hit 
him; but I can not do it. That young 
buck went off in the very best of health, 
if activity is an evidence. 

Well, when a man has done a piece of 
work like that, after going a thousand 
miles, too, he begins to think the fools are 
not all dead yet. If there had been some 
difficult situation, or ill condition of things 
to blame for the failure, it would not have 
been so bad; but to have a thing come and 
look you straight in the face, and say as 
plainly as words could speak it: " Will 
you be so kind as to shoot me?" Then, 
too, when you have done your best, to have 
your game turn tail in apparent disgust, 
shake the dust from its feet, and cut your 
acquaintance — that is humiliating. I have 
heard hunters tell of the fine shots they 
have made, but I suspect the animals have 
a good time when they get together and 
talk over the fine shots we have missed. 

Fortune was generous toward me that 
afternoon. A little farther down the moun- 
tain, as I stepped past a clump of bushes, 

1 looked off to my left, and saw, some 75 
yards away, a bull elk. His side was 
toward me and his head was thrust into a 
bunch of willows. He was either feeding 
or rubbing his horns. I made a few quick 
strides forward, stopped, aimed quickly and 
fired. Silence followed. I could neither 
see nor hear anything of him. Had he, too, 
forsaken me? I hastened to the spot. No, 
there he lay, having fallen at once. 

He was a magnificent animal, as smooth 
and round as a peeled saw-iog. When the 
news spread in the hotel that a tenderfoot 
from Minnesota had killed an elk, within 

2 miles of town, all were surprised, for elk 
were supposed to be off in the mountain 
tops. Some offered congratulations, but 
others were incredulous, and strongly 
hinted that it must be a big buck. All 
doubts were dispelled the next day, how- 
ever, when we brought the head into town 
— that antler-crowned head that now, from 
the wall of my study, looks down upon me, 
though with much milder expression than 
when it roamed the mountains. 



While out after snipe last season, I shot 
one, as he rose. It was about 2 feet above 
the grass when I fired. When I picked it 
up, there was another dead about a rod 
farther on, still warm, with his bill down 
in the mud, full length. 

J. A. P., South Bend, Ind. 



127 



128 



RECREA TION. 



THE ADIRONDACKS AS A RESORT FOR 
SPORTSMEN. 

SEAVER A. MILLER. 

Long before the " North woods," as the 
Adirondack region is sometimes termed, 
became famous as the resort of the invalid, 
many prominent men had discovered that 
here was the home of the red deer, the 
black bear, the beaver, the fox, the otter, 
the hare, the wolf and the lynx. These 
men had also learned that our lakes and 
streams were densely inhabited by trout. 

The beauty of the many Adirondack 
lakes, with their verdant shores, and green 
islands; the grandeur of the mountain 
scenery, have made this region famous. 
In fact it has been called " the Switzer- 
land of America," and has taken rank 
with the famous watering places of the 
nation. 

Among the well known men who early 
visited the Adirondacks, in quest of sport, 
were Ralph Waldo Emerson, James R. 
Lowell, Professor Agassiz, Dr. Jeffries 
Wyman, Dr. Estes Howe, John Holmes 
(the brother of Oliver Wendell), Judge 
Hoar, Horatio Woodman, Amos Binney, 
Joel T. Headley, and W. J. Stillman. Sev- 
eral of these have given to the world 
graphic accounts, in prose or verse, of some 
of their hunting and fishing experiences in 
these hills. 

Many people still have vivid recollec- 
tions of the famous " Murray raid," when 
hundreds of tourists and sportsmen rushed 
to the mountains, lured by the glowing de- 
scription by W. H. H. Murray in his well 
known book. 

Have the Adirondacks ceased to be, to 
the sportsman, the " Paradise " they once 
were ? Have the rod and gun no place 
here, since the advent of the invalid? Have 
the trout forsaken the streams, or the stal- 
wart buck and timid doe the forest ? 

No. Each year finds more people in the 
mountains than the preceding one found. 
An army of these come here purely for rec- 
reation and diversion. Official reports show 
that 5,083 deer were killed in the Adiron- 
dacks during the open season of 1896. 

In this section there are more than 200 
guides pledged to support and to aid in 
the enforcement of the forest and game 
laws of the state. The law allows each 
individual but 2 deer, and this provision 
has not been noticeably violated. Allow- 
ing to each man this number it appears 
that more than 2,500 sportsmen visited 
these mountains during the months of Sep- 
tember and October last. 

Within that period I had the pleasure 
of being one of a party of 5 which killed, 
by hounding, 5 deer in 3 days. Several 
other parties, in nearby camps, had even 
better success; while tourists and sports- 
men frequently saw 5 to 20 deer in a single 



day, proving that deer are as plentiful in 
the Adirondacks as ever. 

I consider the custom of butchering deer, 
by driving them into the water with dogs, 
unsportsmanlike, and it should be prohib- 
ited. 

The reports regarding the fishing are not 
less flattering than are those of the hunt- 
ing; for, in addition to the natural pro- 
duction, millions of trout fry are put into 
Adirondack waters annually. 

The Adirondack Guides' Association, 
consisting of 250 of the best guides, repre- 
senting every section of the Adirondack 
region, and nearly 100 honorary members, 
among whom are statesmen, bankers, brok- 
ers, lawyers, editors and hotel-men, has 
done a great deal toward enforcing the for- 
est and game laws of the state, in preserv- 
ing the fish and game of the Adirondacks, 
and in encouraging tourists and sportsmen 
to visit what Governor Hill aptly calls, 
" The Nation's Play-ground." 

With its thousands of acres of forests, 
filled with game; its innumerable lakes, 
rivers and brooks, filled with speckled 
trout and black bass, and with the enact- 
ment and enforcement of wise and prac- 
tical forest, fish and game laws, the Adiron- 
dack region will continue a popular resort 
for sportsmen, for many years to come. 



WING SHOOTING. 



R. C. BEECROFT. 



In a recent number of Recreation D. T. 
R. asked for hints on wing-shooting. 
Having hunted quails, woodcock, plover, 
snipe, teal, canvasback, wood-ducks, prairie 
chickens and ruffed grouse, I will give 
some ideas gained through observation 
and experience. 

For game not larger than woodcock, or 
bobwhites, use number 9 shot. For wood- 
ducks, prairie chickens, grouse, teal, etc., 
early in the season, use 7's. Later, when 
the birds are old, number 6 are better. 
For large water fowl and wild turkeys, 4's 
are large enough. 

In shooting at -a flying bird, the aim 
should not be directly at it, unless it is fly- 
ing straight away and about the height 
of the eye. 

When a bird has a rising flight, the aim 
should be a little above. If it is flying on 
a level, straight away and above the line of 
the eye, the aim- should be a little below. 
When a bird flies to the left or right, hold 
ahead. 

Always move the gun in the direction 
of the bird's flight, but do not " poke " or 
follow. Cover the object by a quick, 
steady motion; press the trigger at once. 
Some say to shoot with both eyes open. 
Others, to shoot the way that is most nat- 
ural. I believe in the Jatter. If one can 
shoot better by closing one eye, do so; but 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



129 



if as well with both open then that is the 
way for that person to shoot. 

If you miss with the first barrel, recover 
your aim and fire the other. Or, if there 
be 2 or more birds, and you hit with the 
first, instantly select another bird and fire 
the second barrel. 

When your dog stands or points game, 
do not hurry to flush it. Always try to 
drive the birds toward low, light covert in- 
stead of high or dense. 

Giddy-flying birds, such as snipe and 
plover, will rise against the wind, so the 
time to. shoot them is just as they turn. 
To do this, hunt down wind, if possible. 

Always wait, when the field is open* for 
a bird to steady its flight before firing. 
Game generally appears to be farther from 
you than it really is. At 30 yards all kinds 
of birds are most easily killed, and at that 
distance the shot do not tear. 

In quail and prairie chicken shooting, 
the dog should always retrieve the game 
as soon as it falls. If he does not, a 
wounded bird may run and be lost. 

Snap-shooting is done by raising the gun 
and firing as soon as it can be leveled — ab- 
solutely necessary for woodcock, and quail, 
in covert. 

Teal and canvasback ducks are rapid fly- 
ers, sometimes going 65 miles an hour. If 
the shot travel at the average rate of 800 
feet a second, how far ahead of a green- 
wing teal, flying at a right angle to the 
shooter, must one aim when the bird is 40 
yards away? 

It takes the shot, practically, 1-6 of a sec- 
ond to go 40 yards. In 1-6 of a second the 
duck flies about 15 feet. Then this is the 
distance one must hold -ahead. Of course 
this is not exact, but is near enough. A 
few trials will help one, and the eye soon 
becomes trained in judging distances. Per- 
haps, under ordinary circumstances, at 
what appears to be 40 yards, the lead 
should be about 10 feet, if it is a cross-shot. 
Less if the flight is diagonal. 

When the bird is flying toward you, al- 
low it to pass, before shooting. The breast 
feathers of water fowl are thick; then, too, 
it is difficult to allow for the flight of an in- 
coming bird. 

In quail shooting, bear in mind that the 
game is rarely killed at longer range than 
30 yards. Ordinarily the lead for a cross- 
flying quail should be about 3 feet, though 
no fixed rule can be laid down. 

In hunting with a companion, always re- 
frain from shooting birds flushed nearer 
him than to yourself. Remember " there 
are others." 

Treat an unloaded gun with the same 
care you would if it were loaded. Never 
drag a gun toward you from a boat or 
wagon. Many accidents have been caused 
in this way. 

Be very cautious when in thick covert; 
for, in such places, one may be near an- 
other shooter and not see him. 



ABOUT THOSE COYOTES. 

Gardiner, Mont. 

Editor Recreation: Your letter of May 
15th, informing me that my picture of 
" Game Keeper and Antelope " won 12th 
prize, at hand. In reply beg to state that 
in making the picture I used a No. 4 Bulls- 
eye Kodak, size 4x6 inches, with the regu- 
lar lens furnished with that instrument, and 
the film furnished by the Eastman Kodak 
Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Since writing you before I have left the 
army and am now located here, prepared 
to handle tourist parties for the Yellow- 
stone Park, and hunting parties for the 
game ranges of Montana, Eastern Idaho, 
and Wyoming. 

In June Recreation R. G. W., of Horr, 
Mont., quotes me as saying " I can stand 
in the streets of Gardiner and see coyotes 
kill antelope." He also says " I don't say 
anything about seeing or hearing of the 2- 
legged coyotes killing elk, for their teeth 
or horns," and that " when you hear of 
antelope being killed by coyotes you can 
bet the most of the killers have but 2 legs; " 
that " when the antelope got outside of the 
park, last winter, a party of brave guides 
and hunters (of Gardiner), surrounded 
them and killed about 100." 

I would like to say to R. G. W., and in- 
cidentally to the readers of Recreation, 
that when the antelope left the park, last 
November, it was still the open season for 
that game, in Montana; that certain resi- 
dents of this town, among them only one 
professional guide and hunter, killed an- 
telope for their winter's supply of meat; 
that none of the men killed any in excess of 
the number allowed by the law of Mon- 
tana; that previous to that time, and since 
then, I have seen the remains of antelope, 
killed by coyotes; that I have stood in the 
streets of this town and seen them killed, in 
the park; that I have seen (and can bring 
as witnesses a whole troop of cavalry) the 
remains of antelope, killed by coyotes, with- 
in 1 y 2 miles of Mammoth Hot Springs. If 
" R. G. W." is the man I think he is, he is 
one of the class he is pleased to term " 2- 
legged coyotes." I have heard that he 
killed antelope in his yard, at the time they 
left the park, last November, they having 
been driven out by the deep snow and the 
coyotes. 

As regards Geo. Scott and Will Decker, 
neither of them was a resident of this 
town. Mr. Scott lived at Aldridge, a coal 
camp adjoining Horr, and Decker lived at 
Cinnabar. It was proven on the trial that 
Decker did not kill any elk, but that he 
was employed by Scott to help pack out 
the meat. Decker, being only a boy and 
not knowing the park lines, was brought 
into this trouble through no fault of his 
own. 

The elk which " R. G. W." claims was 
killed by the residents of Gardiner, was 



13° 



RECREA TION. 



driven out by the deep snow, on the 13th 
and 14th of December. About 3,000 of 
them came over the trail from Hell-Roar- 
ing creek and passed out of the park over 
Crevasse mountain. I rode over that coun- 
try, on the afternoon and night of Decem- 
ber 17th, and saw where about 100 had been 
killed; but so far as I know none was 
killed by residents of Gardiner, in excess of 
the number allo'wed by law. Of all that 
number only one was killed for his horns. 
That one was killed. by Geo. Scott, within 
the limits of the park. Much of this game 
was killed by residents of Cinnabar, Bear 
Gulch and by people living near these 
places. All the meat was taken, showing 
plainly that the elk were killed only for 
food. 

During the winter of 1895-1896 elk and 
deer were killed in the park, near here, for 
the saddles and horns only. The men who 
did the killing were arrested, tried, con- 
victed and punished, under the laws then 
governing the park. 

During the past winter, so far as known 
by any of the persons patrolling the park, 
no game has been killed within or near the 
park, for tusks or horns. I have ridden 
over the country a great deal and have seen 
nothing to indicate that game has been 
killed for such purposes. The past winter 
was a hard one, and the game died by the 
hundreds. I have seen bunches of 5 to 9 
elk, all dead in one place, with their tusks 
gone; but from personal examination, I 
am positive they died from exhaustion and 
starvation. 

, Owing to the fact that all lawless char- 
acters caught in the park are brought here, 
when discharged and turned loose, some 
people seem to take a delight in claiming 
that all the residents here are lawless. To 
show the feeling that exists in regard to law 
and order in this town it is only necessary 
to state that last winter a man was arrested 
by the State Game Warden, for illegally 
killing elk, and was brought here for trial; 
but fearing he would be convicted here, he 
took a change of venue to Horr, where 
our law abiding friend " R. G. W." claims 
to live, and was promptly acquitted. 

William Van Buskirk. 



ON ARKANSAW LAKE. 



LEWIS C. BURNBLL, JR. 



The cool night air gently fanned our faces 
as we drove up to the " O " ranch. With 2 
companions, I was out for a hunt, and in a 
few minutes after reaching our destination, 
we were seated around the little table, try- 
ing to satisfy appetites made vigorous by 
an all-day's ride across the rolling sand- 
hills of Western Nebraska. After supper 
we gathered around the stove, to discuss 
the shooting on Arkansaw lake. 



This lake is in the heart of the sand-hills. 
Here, during the migratory season, geese 
and ducks gather in great numbers. One 
may find canvasbacks, mallards, redheads, 
bluebills and other varieties of ducks, 
where they come to feed on the wild rice 
along the marshy shores. 

The clock struck 10 as we rolled in for 
the night; and I was sure I had not slept 
15 minutes when I received a rude thump 
in the side, which I was half inclined to re- 
sent; but my friends were up and dressed, 
while the aroma of coffee filled the room. 

We probably looked somewhat like ar- 
mored knights of old, in the dim light, as. 
with hip boots and Stanley helmets; we 
marched across the hills. H. jumped a 
jack rabbit, and after giving it both barrels, 
watched it disappear over the top of a 
ridge. He redeemed himself soon, by kill- 
ing a grouse that crossed our front. 

Sharp-tailed grouse were plenty a few 
years ago, in Western Nebraska; but the 
merciless pot hunter, shooting before the 
law was off, killed the birds in such num- 
bers they are now a thing of the past 
Where hundreds could be found, only an 
occasional one is left. 

Arriving at the, lake, we saw many flocks 
of water fowl scattered over the glimmer- 
ing surface of the water. Stationing our- 
selves about ill the rushes, every thing was 
ready for the sport to begin. Presently 
some one got a shot and the ducks began 
to fly. A flock of mallards headed for my 
blind. Nearer and nearer they came, and 
in a moment were over me. Giving them 
both barrels, I was pleased to see 3 of the 
beauties strike the water. Next came a 
flock of bluebills, and 2 left the ranks at 
my summons. Then followed a miss. 

So the sport continued for an hour or 
more. The incessant banging, on my right 
and left, told that my comrades were not 
idle. From the noise, one might have 
thought there was a small battle going on. 

My attention was suddenly attracted by 
a steady " ho-onk, ho-onk." Glancing up, 
I noticed a long, V-shaped line coming 
straight toward me. Frantically I dug into 
my pockets for some shells loaded with 
heavy shot, and had just gotten them into 
my gun when the geese sailed over, not 50 
yards high. Covering the leader, I pulled 
the trigger and then gave number 2 the 
second barrel. Both birds fell with an im- 
mense splash; one striking so near I was 
drenched with water. 

The ducks having left for quieter places, 
I gathered up my birds. 

Throwing the spoils on the grass, I 
counted 2 geese, 2 canvasbacks, 4 mallards 
and 8 blue-bills. My comrades soon came 
up with 20 birds, making 36 for the morn- 
ing's shoot. 

In an hour we were back at the ranch, 
packing the ducks in the wagon for the 
start homeward. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



131 



DUCKING ON PUGET SOUND. 

North Yakima, Wash. 

Editor Recreation: A few years ago I 
sent word to George Sneider, of Hoaquim, 
Wash., I would be with him for a duck 
hunt. Now Sneider is a hearty, jovial fel- 
low who has shot ducks till he has it down 
to a system. He ran a sail-boat from 
Hoaquim to Owyehut, 17 miles, across the 
harbor. The boat was 30 feet long, carried 
a mainsail and a jib, and was well-builii 
throughout. He had about 60 decoys, 
mostly canvasbacks; a skiff, an Irish set- 
ter and a 10 gauge Lefever gun. 

When I met him at Hoaquim, he told me 
he had to take a small load of lumber up to 
the Humptulips, a river emptying into the 
harbor. This we landed in the evening, 
after a pleasant sail with the outgoing tide, 
and dropped anchor in the mouth of the 
river. During the night a storm arose and 
increased in violence. We could not ex- 
pect any shooting till it ceased. 

On the morning of the third day the 
storm lifted and we sailed for Owyehut. A 
stiff breeze blew inshore, and as we neared 
the landing, Sneider cried out: " Look at 
the canvasbacks! " 

The rough weather had driven them 
into this cove. There were hundreds of 
them, flying back and forth, about a quarter 
of a mile from shore, where they were feed- 
ing. We had to do our shooting before 
the tide came in too heavy; so we worked 
with a will, got everything into the skiff, 
and pulled for the shore, to get willows 
for a blind. With a boatload of willows, 
Sneider rowed to where the ducks were 
feeding. The blind was quickly built and 
the decoys put out. 

All the time we were at work, the ducks 
were flying. Many times I was tempted 
to grab a gun and shoot, but checked the 
desire. What a sight it was! Over 50 de- 
coys bobbing with the motion of the waves. 
The ducks were moving swiftly back and 
forth. Now, a good bunch comes right 
toward our flock. They drop a little but 
fly on up the bay. After going several 
hundred yards they wheel. This time there 
is no mistake. Some of them settled. 
Others were looking for a good place, 
when we opened on them. Three dead, one 
winged. " Shoot quick or you lose that 
bird! If he dives, he will not come up 
within range." Now the dog plays a part. 
He brings them all in. Even while he 
works, we drop others for him. 

This is a time when you live intensely. 
Every moment is full of thrilling interest. 
I remember distinctly how much I wished 
for a leather lining to Sneider's shell-box; 
for the noise of the shells, against the tin, 
sounded harsh. One feels that nothing 
should mar the completeness of the sport, 
in such a time. 

They came fast enough. We tried to get 



in a shot at all of them, but could not. 
Often a bird was hard hit and fell where 
the dog could not see it. Then out one of 
us would go, pulling as if for big wages; 
back again to the blind, eager for a chance 
at the dashing birds. How strong they 
are! What shooting it takes to kill them! 
What beauties they are, lying in the boat! 
Almost all canvasbacks, though there are d 
few mallards and pintails. 

Now the tide makes its way toward the 
blind. The ducks have ceased to come; so 
we row to the big boat, after 2 hours of the 
best shooting I ever enjoyed. Over 50 
ducks were unloaded and hung in the ware- 
house. 



SUMMERING IN THE TETON COUNTRY. 

Tampa, Fla. 

Editor Recreation: Any one who likes 
to travel, should go over one of the scenic 
routes in Colorado. Take in Salt lake and 
Salt Lake City, thence on to Market lake, 
Idaho. From there a good stage line will 
take you 80 miles to Teton City, thence 20 
miles, over the Teton Range, crossing it at 
9,000 feet elevation to the Jackson Hole 
country, fetching up at the hospitable ranch 
of that gentlemanly guide, S. M. Leek, of 
Jackson, Wyoming. 

A day or 2 spent resting at the ranch, 
and fishing in Snake river, will relieve all 
fatigue. Have Mr. Leek put a boat on a 
wagon and, either by vehicle or saddle and 
pack horses, go to Jackson lake, some 25 
or 30 miles away. Here the outing really 
begins. The mighty Tetons, clothed near 
the base with timber and verdure, lift their 
snow-capped heads something like 15,000 
feet high, while against their sides, at an 
elevation of 7,000 feet above sea level, lies 
beautiful Lake Jackson, 5 miles wide and 
20 miles long. The scene is so grand and 
so beautiful that one might liken it to an 
Alpine range; but such American scenery 
needs no comparison. 

There is a succession of lakes here, all 
near together, and connected by Snake 
river. The water is very deep and full of 
rainbow, salmon and other trout. Some 
have been caught that weighed 15 pounds. 
The air is so dry, clear and cool; the waters 
so cold and smooth; the scenery so capti- 
vating, that one will be loath to leave it, 
and several weeks will quickly pass. 

The country abounds in game, and one 
will doubtless see many elk, antelope and 
deer, but these can not be hunted before 
September. Grouse and sage hens are 
plentiful, and bear can be found in the re- 
mote mountain fastnesses. 

Should one tire, then on to Yellowstone 
National Park, only 2 days' travel. All 
along the route the scenery is constantly 
changing. 

On reaching the park you can take park 



132 



RECREATION. 



coaches, or, better still, continue by your 
own conveyance; see the geysers and other 
wonders, go via Yellowstone lake to Yel- 
lowstone falls. Here you can dismiss your 
outfit and take the stage to Cinnabar, and 
thence by the N. P. Railway home. I 
made this trip last season, and found July 
20th to September 1st the best time, as the 
mosquito season was then past. 

It will take you some time, after you have 
reached home, to digest all you have seen 
and learned. You will begin to realize the 
vastness of the country in which you live, 
and how little you know of it. Your mind 
will be broadened, you will look back upon 
the outing with pleasant recollections, and 
will wonder how you could have seen so 
much at so small an outlay; viz. $250 to 
$300. W. H. Beck with. 



LOOKING FOR WINTER MEAT. 

Jackson, Wyo. 

Editor Recreation: Having missed the 
elk when they moved into Jackson's Hole, 
which they did during a big snow storm 
in November, and when thousands of them 
passed within 2 miles of our place, we kept 
looking for more elk; but could not make 
much headway on account of the continual 
snowfall. At last I had to give up getting 
my winter's meat from that band. How- 
ever, my experience in»Northern Minnesota 
came in handy and I made a toboggan out 
of a plank, a pair of web snowshoes out 
of a wagon bow and an elk skin. Then, 
with a companion, I started out to get 
meat, on another tack. 

Having on a suit of white, canvas cov- 
ered clothing, with mittens and gun-cover 
white, I knew if I found game I was sure 
of a shot. We tramped 2 days, through 
ZV2 feet of snow and storm, to Cedar 
mountain, whose cone is usually swept bare 
of snow and where some game winters. 

Putting up at a ranch our first inquiry 
was for game. The man said he had seen 
thousands of elk pass and that getting be- 
hind a bunch of 300 he had driven them 
past his neighbor's door, and they killed 
enough to last till summer. He graciously 
offered us all we could haul home. How- 
ever, I knew deer were plentiful and wanted 
some venison. In the morning my partner 
and I started out. The weather having 
cleared we went to Cedar mountain and 
climbing it found ample signs of deer, elk, 
wolf, lynx and mountain lion but no game. 
They seemed to have gone up the river 
and into a large tract of willows. 

Separating from my companion we took 
to the open plain, or sage brush flat, as it is 
called. I went in the open and my partner 
skirted the foothills. Presently' I heard a 
shot and looking in the direction taken by 



M could see some deer running up a 

canyon. I could not get there in time to 
head them off. 

I went through a cut, in some low hills, 
and climbed a knoll. Presently a big 
buck jumped up, in a bunch of poplars, and 
started down the hill. I could not get a 
good shot and saw him join a bunch of 
about 30 deer that had been lying in the 
sage brush, on the flat. Then he left them 
and turned into some quaking asp, in the 
foothills. I followed and was making good 
headway when I heard a snort above me 
and looking up caught a glimpse of his 
flag going over the crest of the hill. 

On climbing up I saw where he had 
doubled on his track and waited just long 
enough for me to come in sight of him 
when he took after the bunch again. I 
took up the trail, skirting a bunch of wil- 
lows and soon saw 4 pairs of elk antlers. 

Going in I routed the elk, and waiting 
until they got into the open and started up 
the hill I picked the largest, fired and broke 
his back. The other 3 bulls ran about 50 
yards and stood on the side hill looking 
back. I did no;t shoot at them, for I had 
meat enough. 

I arrived at the ranch at 8 p.m. and found 
my companion had killed one small buck 
deer. Burt Harris. 



CONDENSED RATIONS. 

After careful deliberation, 45 of the most 
experienced officers in the U. S. Army have 
adopted a highly-condensed emergency ra-' 
tion — and now we wonder why this was not 
done long ago. The daily ration, as issued, 
weighs 35 ounces, and consists of the fol- 
lowing items: 16 ounces of hard bread, 10 
ounces of side bacon, in paraffin paper; 4 
ounces of pea meal (for soup), in a cloth 
bag; 2 ounces of coffee; saccharin (solid 
sugar), 4 gr.ains, in the form of 2 tablets; 
y 2 ounce of salt; ^ ounce of tobacco, and 
f ounce of pepper, in a pill-box. The total 
cost of the ration is 17^4 cents, and in bulk 
it is so small that when first issued it was 
viewed with anxiety akin to alarm. 

On May 18, Troop E. 1st U. S. Cavalry, 
commanded by Capt. W. C. Brown, left 
Fort Sill, I. T. for a 12 days' trip, through 
a wild and uninhabited country, to test the 
staying qualities of the condensed ration. 
On the last 10 days of the trip, the entire 
troop, of 2 officers and 44 men, subsisted on 
only 5 full rations each; or, in other words, 
Yz of an emergency ration each day. The 
soldiers found the ration better than it 
looked; that it fully satisfied hunger, and 
sustained health and full vigor, in spite of 
long marches and stormy weather. 

The continuous rain had a far more de- 
pressing effect on the troop than the half- 
rations. Although the men lost an average 
of 3 pounds each, in weight, in the 12 days, 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



*33 



they gained strength until the troop, as a 
whole, lifted, at the end of the trip, one ton 
more than when it set out. 

The possibilities of the condensed ration 
are almost infinite. A cavalry regiment 
can now move long distances quite inde- 
pendent of the slow-creeping wagon-train 
— which is the hostile Indian's best friend! 
The independence of the soldier, in a hot 
campaign, would certainly be doubled. 

The hunter and the explorer can now re- 
duce their packs very considerably; and if 
the condensed ration is soldered up in alu- 
minum boxes, to protect it from damp- 
ness until consumed, it may even enable 
him, with the aid of the sustaining kola 
nut, to reach the North pole, or to cross 
Borneo, from side to side. 



WHAT CONSTITUTES A REASONABLE BAG? 

The greatest duck, squirrel and quail 
shooting to be found anywhere is in Posey 
county, in the Southwestern part of Indi- 
ana. The year 1896 was a grand one. 

During the shooting season of that year 
Mr. Seth Leavenworth, of Mt. Vernon, 
killed over 300 squirrels. He is a hunter for 
the love of the sport, and never took more 
than he could use. He was frequently ac- 
companied by his wife, on his shooting 
trips. She is also a good shot and killed 
many squirrels. 

The quail shooters enjoyed a lot of fine 
sport. The best record made, in or , day, 
was that of Mr. John F. Kight, of Indian- 
apolis, who, in company with Sam Stall- 
ings, bagged 105 quail in a 10 hour hunt, 
last November. The birds were flushed by 
Stallings' famous setters, and were all killed 
on the wing. Most of them were used by 
Mr. K. who sent them to his friends. 

The best duck ground is Hovey's lake, 
where Mr. Charles J. Hovey has built a 
club house. Shooters from Louisville, 
Chicago, Indianapolis, Henderson, and 
Owensboro belong to the club. 

The prospect is good for 1897. The 
squirrel law expired on June 1st, and shoot- 
ers who have been out report them numer- 
ous. The number of young quails is said 
to be greater than ever before known. 
Great sport is expected next fall. 

P. W. Roche, Mount Vernon, Ind. 

Mr. Roche writes me a personal letter, 
in connection with the above notes, in 
which he says, " The men mentioned are all 
expert hunters, and not game hogs; so 
do not be mistaken and take them for 
such." 

I have a high regard for Mr. Roche, and 
for his opinion; though I cannot agree 
with him in his estimate of these men. I 
claim that the killing of 300 squirrels by 
one man, in one season, is excessive. It is 
out of all reason, and out of all proportion 



to what any ordinarily high minded sports- 
man would have the time, the opportunity 
or the desire to do. 

I claim that the killing of 105 quails by 2 
men, in one day, is also extravagant and 
unjust. In many states, there are laws 
which limit the killing of game, to each 
man, in open season. In the other states, 
and among sportsmen at large, there are 
unwritten laws which say only a reasonable 
number of birds or animals may be killed 
in one day, by one man. The consensus of 
these statutes, and these unwritten laws, is 
that 15 to 25 quails, or one dozen ducks, 
prairie chickens or squirrels, is enough for 
any decent man to kill, in one day. When 
any man goes beyond these limits, he is en- 
croaching on the rights of fellow sports- 
men. He is killing more than he is entitled 
to; and as game is gradually decreasing 
everywhere, at all times, he is helping more 
rapidly than he has any right to help, to- 
ward the total extermination. When a 
man makes such a bag as provided by the 
laws above cited, he should be ready to 
quit, even though the day may still be 
young, and plenty of game yet in sight. 
He should be content to sit in the shade 
and commune with nature, or with his com- 
panions, and to enjoy the results of his 
reasonable day's work. 

Suppose a man spends one day each 
week after squirrels, during the 3 autumn 
months. That would be 12 days of shoot- 
ing, and would certainly be enough for any 
but a game hog. Suppose he kills his full 
quota of 12 squirrels each day. He would 
then have, to his credit, say 150 squirrels. 
Mr. Leavenworth is credited, in the above 
report, with over 300 in one season. I 
therefore submit, to the readers of Rec- 
reation at large, the proposition that he 
has killed at least 150 more than he is en- 
titled to, or than he could reasonably wish 
to kill. 

Let me hear from my readers, on this 
subject. I should like a frank and free ex- 
pression on the question as to what really 
does constitute a reasonable bag, for a day's 
shooting, on any kind of game, in states 
where the law does not limit the number to 
be killed. Editor. 



PLENTY OF GAME. 

Jackson, Wyo. 

Editor Recreation: I came here 3 weeks 
ago for recreation, and find lamentable evi- 
dences of an unusually severe winter. The 
decaying carcasses of elk are to be seen 
everywhere. The natural supposition would 
be that elk are being exterminated: but 
from careful investigation I am satisfied 
they are increasing, rapidly. More elk have 
been seen the past winter than for years. 
This is no doubt due to the better pro- 
tection resulting from the enforcement of 



134 



RECREA TION. 



the game laws and the driving out of the 
Indians. 

The young elk seem to have fared worst 
last winter. It is estimated, and I think cor- 
rectly, that about 4,000 calves succumbed 
to the cold and snow. The old animals 
withstood the winter as well as usual and 
few carcasses of these can be seen. This 
great mortality among the young elk is due 
to their lack of strength to break the crust 
of the snow, to get at the feed. 

However there are more calves left than 
usual and fine sport may be anticipated 
later. Every day, for the first 10 days after 
my arrival, elk and deer could be seen from 
the ranch, feeding on the hillsides; but the 
disappearing snow has given them wider 
range, and they are passing back into the 
mountains. 

Antelope are traveling North, to their 
summer range. Bands of 20 to 80 are seen 
every day. 

Trout fishing is poor on account of ris- 
ing and muddy waters. However, a few 
small creeks yield fair sport. On the day 
after my arrival at the ranch S. N. Leek, at 
whose place I am staying, caught, with fly, 
9 trout that weighed 24 pounds — 4 of them 
weighing 16 pounds. All this in 3 hours. 
I have made (several fine catches, some ex- 
ceeding Steve's in numbers and total 
weight, but not so large. Ducks and geese 
are nesting as are, in fac*t, all kinds of birds. 

B. F. Jones, M.D. 



SALT LAKE, UTAH. WHERE TO GO. 

Editor Recreation: For the benefit of 
the devotees of rod and gun the following 
pointers are given as to the game to be 
found in the Rocky mountain country, 
about Glenwood Springs. Among the 
birds are the sage grouse, the largest of the 
grouse family. These are found in the open 
country. Blue grouse are found, in large 
numbers, along the trout streams and in 
parks. The pin-tail grouse inhabits the 
streams and willows. It is a quick bird and 
affords rare sport. The ptarmigan is about 
the size of the ruffed grouse and is found 
only above timber line. In winter its plum- 
age is snow white. The following varieties 
of ducks abound in the mountain lakes: 
Mallard, canvasback, redhead, bluewing 
teal, greenwing teal, cinnamon teal, golden 
eye, butter ball, wood-duck and shell-drake. 

Elk still abound and are in prime condi- 
tion by September, in which month they 
commence bugling.' Large bands are in 
the more remote parks, and near the flat- 
tops. 

Deer are at their best in the fall months. 
They frequent the valleys and lower moun- 
tain ranges until winter, when they move 
down to the low country. The sportsman 
who wants bear can have his chance of cin- 
namon, black, brown, silvertip and grizzly. 



As to the mountain lion, or puma, it has 
occasionally been captured in this neigh- 
borhood, measuring 9 feet 6 inches from tip 
to tip. Plenty of bob-cats, wolves and 
wolverines. Mountain sheep are to be 
found in the higher ranges. 
W. H. Hubbard, Glenwood Springs, Col. 



A curious case was passed on by Attorney-General 
Fowler, of Wyoming, with reference to the right of J. A. 
Adams, a Jackson's Hole ranchman, to retain, in his pos- 
session, 77 head of elk. These came into Mr. Adams's cor- 
ral, during the past winter, and were eating his hay, when 
he fastened them in and kept them. A demand for their 
release was made by the State Game Warden and Mr. 
Adams refused to comply, saying he intended domesticat- 
ing the animals and that as he had saved them from starva- 
tion he was entitled to their possession. The Attorney- 
General's opinion is to the effect that the elk are the property 
of the State and that their retention is a violation of the 
State game law, which forbids capture of wild game, by pit- 
fall or trap. — Salt Lake "Tribune." 

Above clipping is indeed an interesting 
one, in that it opens up a fine point of law. 

L. M. Earl. 



DEER IN THE ADIRONDACKS. 

Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

Editor Recreation: It is usual at every 
session of the Legislature to offer numer- 
ous amendments to the game laws. In my 
opinion, what we need is not new fish and 
game laws, but the enforcement of those 
we have. In some parts of the Adiron- 
dacks, the game laws are frequently violated 
every year. This is not, however, the fault 
of the Game Warden, but because of lack 
of sufficient resident assistants. 

The Adirondack Guides Association in- 
cludes the best guides from nearly every 
portion of the Adirondacks, and it seems 
to me proper the game protectors for this 
region should be appointed from among 
its numbers. 

I believe that killing deer in the water 
should be prohibited, and that if hounding 
is permitted at all, shooting on the run- 
way only should be allowed.* I think the 
majority of sportsmen and guides are 
agreed that the killing of does and fawns 
is inhuman, and should be prohibited. 
Anything that will preserve the game of 
the Adirondacks and increase the number 
of deer, birds and fish, will be beneficial 
to the region and to the business of the 
railroads, hotels and guides. 

Seaver A. Miller. 

* Hounding and jacking are now prohib- 
ited in New York, for a term of 5 years. — 
Editor. 



LOOKING FOR DUCKS. 

On the morning of March 8th, with 2 

friends, K and S , I left the train 

at Beardstown, 111., on the Illinois river. 
We rented a boat big enough to hold 3 men 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



135 



and pulled down stream; finally landing 
and engaging board at a farm-house. 

Now we were ready for the ducks. We 
could go in any direction, for the river 
was out of its banks and all over the coun- 
try. Crossing to the South side, I left S 

and K among the trees, while I rowed 

around to stir up the ducks. The men in 
the timber blew their calls until the woods 
echoed with their duck music, but the ducks 
could not be induced to come within gun- 
shot. We did not give up until approach- 
ing darkness drove us to the house. 

In the morning we rowed up a creek 
2 miles. The rain soon came and drove 
us to shelter. No ducks yet — rather dis- 
couraging, we thought. We stayed around 
the fire, at the farm-house, until about 4 

o'clock, when S started out alone. He 

saw some mallards go down in a cornfield 
and thought he could make a sneak on 
them. He did succeed in killing a duck — 
canvas-back, he called it — and came in 
elated. 

During the afternoon a member of the 
Griggsville Gun Club came to the house. 
On examining the duck, he said it had 

been wounded before S killed it, and 

was sick and not much of a duck anyway. 

We did not tell S of this, for fear he 

would be discouraged. 

That evening we all went out but failed 
to get any game. The next day, our suc- 
cess being no better, we returned to town. 
W. H. Whitney, Chatham, 111. 



AN UNWELCOME STORM. 

Glenwood Springs, Col. 

Editor Recreation: Bill and I had 
walked our soles thin in trying to get a 
shot at some elk we had seen, up in the 
mountains. Leaves and twigs were so dry 
game could hear us a mile away, in spite 
of our " noiseless, non-slipping, guaran- 
teed waterproof " shoes. 

After a pow-wow, we went to camp to 
await snow, which seemed about due. It 
came, and it was of the wet kind. We had 
a small tent, with a poor excuse for a cen- 
tre pole. At 2 o'clock in the morning we 
were called on to awaken. 

The pole had broken, and there we were. 
Dark as pitch, and snowing as it can snow 
only high in the mountains. After a con- 
sultation, we decided to take things coolly. 
This worked all right at first, but about 5 
o'clock, the warmth from our bodies began 
to melt the snow. The water came inside, 
in rivulets, until it would have been a credit 
to anybody to be jolly under such condi- 
tions. 

Another pole must be cut. After scrap- 
ping for half an hour, to see which should 
have the honor of going for it, Bill was 
victorious. When he came back with the 
pole, it was about 3 feet too long. I 



thought it would be a good plan to stand up 
under the tent, letting it rest on my head, 
while he was chopping off the pole. 

In pulling the tent around, to get the 
centre over my head, I found a slit 15 
inches long, made by the pole in breaking. 
My head slipped through this before I 
knew what had come over me; but I felt 
sure half a ton of the beautiful went down 
my back. 

Like 2 jays, we had pitched the tent un- 
der a balsam, for the shade, not thinking 
of the snow that might come. While I was 
shouting to Bill to hurry with the pole, he 
knocked all the snow off the tree, from the 
ground up. I was right where I got the 
only snap I ever had in my life. 

I did not have a camera and a flash-light, 
but I would give a good price for a picture 
of Bill in his " nighty," out in the snow, 
cutting a pole just the right length; and 
the other fellow taking a snow-bath at 5 
a.m. on the 22d of October. However, 
we killed an elk. All's well that ends well. 

J. E. M. 



WHERE DID HE STAY THAT NIGHT? 

Editor Recreation: Last September our 
party of 4 left this place for a 2-weeks' deer 
hunt in the Adirondacks. While there, we 
had a peculiar experience. If any reader 
of Recreation has had a similar one, I 
should like to hear from him. 

We camped at our old grounds of several 
years before, on Twitchell creek, Herkimer 
county. In '95 I shot 2 deer within ^2 
mile of this camp; but last fall game was 
not so plentiful. 

While 2 of our hunters were returning 
to camp one evening they fell in with a 
guide. As they were all walking on a skid- 
way, about 5 rods apart, a deer bounded 
across their path. The guide gave it 2 
shots; the next hunter fired 5; while 2 
more were given it by the 3d man. At the 
last shot the deer dropped, or at least dis- 
appeared. 

On going to the spot where it was sup- 
posed to be, nothing was found. Tracks 
led to that spot, but no farther. The hunters 
circled for a quarter of a mile around, but 
not a sign of a deer. About 20 rods from 
the mysterious spot, at a point where the 
skid-ways joined, the hunters stood and 
talked the matter over. 

The peculiar part of the story is that 
on the following morning, at the very 
spot where the consultation was held, the 
deer was found dead. Five bullets had hit 
it; 2 of them, ordinarily, would have 
dropped a deer at once. 

Now, where was that deer when we were 
looking for it? Schenevus. 

As water is the standard in specific grav- 
ity, Recreation is the standard of sports-> 



136 



RECREATION. 



men's periodicals. Although not a hunter 
myself, and, in fact, unable to stop the 
easiest mark that walks the woods, I do 
not believe in game destruction. During 
October the number of outside hunters in 
this State was large. A Wisconsin Central 
railroad man told me he saw over 300 
sportsmen, from Ohio and Indiana, un- 
loaded from one train, between Chippewa 
Falls and Abbotsford. The State law for- 
bids the shipping of game out of the State, 
and none of these men ever sell what they 
kill. So there certainly is, on the one hand 
a needless destruction of game, or an un- 
lawful shipment of venison out of the State. 
It is safe to say that fully 1,500 visiting 
sportsmen come to Wisconsin each year. 
L. J., Marshfield, Wis. 



The law protecting quail in Indiana, al- 
* lowing no open season for 2 years, has re- 
sulted already in a notable change in the 
habits of the birds. They are tamer, and 
are nesting in the meadows and orchards, 
on all sides. In one of 2 nests, found 
this week, were 17 eggs; and in the other 
40 — an extraordinary sitting. Two broods 
in a season are frequent, in this latitude, 
and such a nest of eggs shows how rap- 
idly quail may propagate if left undis- 
turbed, for a time, now that so many of 
their natural enemies have become practi- 
cally extinct. 

The law allows the shooting of young 
squirrels, with the beginning of June, and 
thereafter the beech woods of this hilly re- 
gion — Orange county — will echo with the 
sound of shotguns and rifles. Just now 
there appears to be a gray squirrel for ev- 
ery bush. 

Stanley Waterloo, Paoli, Ind. 



That was an interesting article, in Rec- 
reation, on " Wing Shooting." The boys 
should be delighted with it. It contains 
such a fund of information and pointers, 
that they should have no difficulty, how, in 
becoming expert shots. 

Why not give the fish hogs a rest and 
turn your attention to those miserable 
suckers who call themselves sportsmen and 
who, in your part of the world, have been 
out killing off the snipe and woodcock, as 
they land from abroad, on your hospitable 
shores? Do you know the birds have their 
eggs and young, with us? How much ear- 
lier must they be with you? Don't you 
think it a cruel, beastly shame to shoot 
these birds in spring, when the females are 
carrying their eggs, and in some cases have 
their nests and even their young? I can 
not understand why any fair minded sports- 
man would countenance such murderous, 
brutal, unfeeling and damnable action. 

Get out from under such a stigma, as 



quickly as you can. Use your best efforts 
to protect, instead of to destroy, birds and 
their young. 

Get your wise senators to pass a law to 
keep these migrants from landing on your 
shores, Let the birds come on here, and 
we will see that they are not destroyed in 
the breeding season. 

H. Austen, Halifax, N. S. 

Mr. Austen is right. The killing of any 
game bird, or animal, in spring, is nothing 
more nor less than slaughter, and all the 
better class of sportsmen have long since 
quit it. The other kind should be com- 
pelled to quit. — Editor. 



Your latest number of Recreation at 
hand, and it is all right, of course. They 
all are. I thoroughly agree with you in 
the stand you take for better game protec- 
tion. 

There is more money to a community of 
business men, working-men, or farmers, for 
every head of large game honestly killed 
and used by sportsmen, than for an equal 
number of domestic stock. Every outfit 
that goes into the hills pays $10 to $100 a 
head for all the game it gets. This money 
is left where it is most needed. Therefore 
I say " Why kill the goose that lays the 
golden egg? " 

I believe in a small license for non-resi- 
dent hunters, merely nominal; say $1; 
just to require them to show their good 
intentions, and to place each man on rec- 
ord. A. R. Randies, Seattle, Wash. 



There is practically no game here, al- 
though a few years ago excellent small 
game shooting was to be had. Game hogs 
have done the work. To see a gray squir- 
rel, ruffed grouse or quail is now a rarity. 
Formerly there was fine bass fishing in the 
streams and dams, but the carp have 
cleaned the good fish out. I think the carp 
more of a curse than the English sparrow. 
Several men here have been prosecuted for 
illegal hunting. I am glad to see it, and 
am pleased to know that brother sports- 
men are touching the thing up in other lo- 
calities. 

I have Recreation on my desk and can 
say of what it advocates, " them's my sen- 
timents too." J. H. C, Salem, O. 



The following is a list of the officers 
elected at the annual meeting of the Bergen 
County Gun Club, held in Hackensack, 
N. J., June 10th, 1897. 

President, G. P. Griffiths; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Marshall Herrington; Treasurer, H. 
D. Warner; Secretary, E. A. Jackson. 
Trustees Graham Van Keuren, H. N. Hall, 
H. J. Blauvelt. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



*37 



This club was organized in June, 1896, 
and had its first shoot on July 4th of that 
year. Since that time the club has trapped 
100,000 targets and has sold, on the club 
grounds, 17,000 loaded shells. It has 85 
active members on its list, and no honorary 
members. The club shoot is on the 4th 
Saturday of each month. The principal at- 
traction, on the calendar, is the impending 
shoot for the Recreation cup, represent- 
ing the amateur championship (clay tar- 
gets) of the State of N. J. This trophy is 
shot for once every 2 months, during 1897, 
on dates as announced by the Club. 

There is a regular practice shoot each 
Saturday afternoon, and all readers of Rec- 
reation are invited. 



Sportsmen have been very successful in 
this county, the past hunting and fishing 
season; but the pot-hunters were also ac- 
tive. We have, about here, woodcock, 
pheasants, Wilson's snipe, ducks, rabbits, 
and squirrels, enough to please any rea- 
sonable man, if he knows their grounds. 
Black bass, pickerel and carp are caught 
in fair numbers in the streams and lakes. 

The non-enforcement of game laws has 
made some hunters, who may call them- 
selves sportsmen, bold in their shooting, 
out of season. They come here under the 
pretense of shooting woodcock, early in 
the season, and kill many young ruffed 
grouse. My old woodcock dog nearly al- 
ways turns tail and skulks away, on meet- 
ing such men in the brush, as if ashamed to 
be seen near them. 

Enough of this " calamity wail " ! All 
that we lovers of rod and gun ask, is to 
have a fair field and game killed only in 
season — none for market. 
H. H. E., Springboro, Crawford Co., Pa. 



New Petersburgh, O. 

Editor Recreation: Squirrels and rab- 
bits are plentiful this year, although a 
great many were killed by -the market 
hunters. One party of 2 killed over 400 
gray and fox squirrels during last open 
season, September 1 to December 15. 
Many were killed out of season, also. 

Another party killed, in one day, 53 rab- 
bits and 64 quails. I heard a game butcher 
say he killed 16 quails at one shot, as they 
were on the ground, huddled together. 

I went squirrel hunting one afternoon 
last season, starting about 2 o'clock. I 
hunted till 5, killing 8 grays, which was as 
many as I wanted. 

Recreation is the best magazine pub- 
lished, and I would not be without it for 
3 times the regular subscription price. 

Wm. Dwyer, M.D. 



to the law of this State governing the kill- 
ing of moose and caribou. 

Our last legislature passed a new game 
law and the following is the provision, at 
present, on this subject: 

" No person shall hunt, catch, ship or 
have in possession, or under control, at any 
time, any moose or caribou; except that 
antlered moose and antlered caribou may 
be killed between the 5th day of November 
and the 10th day of November, in the same 
year; but no person shall kill more than 
one moose and one caribou in any one 
season." 

The law has the usual provision, forbid- 
ding shipment out of the State. 

W. W. S., Duluth, Minn. 



On returning from my Florida hunt- 
ing trip, I found Recreation awaiting me. 
I derived so much enjoyment from it that 
I feel like thanking you and doing some- 
thing in return. 

A writer in Recreation mentioned 
shooting quails in trees, and the idea was 
ridiculed by some hunters. While in Flor- 
ida, I had the misfortune to have a yellow 
cur for a companion; and he was better for 
snakes than for quails. He thrashed around 
50 to 100 yards ahead, frightening the birds 
so they often took refuge in the pines. I 
killed more from the trees than on the 
wing. I imagine I hear shouts of laughter, 
from wing-shots.* D. T. T. 



A green match at live birds took place on 
May 12, 1897, under the auspices of the 
Recreation Gun Club, of this place. Prof. 
B. P. Gentry and C. E. Darrow challenged 
Dr. C. E. Still and H. E. Patterson to 
shoot a friendly match of 10 live, birds, at 
25 yards rise, 100 yards boundary. None 
of the gentlemen had ever shot at a live 
bird, from a trap. All however have had 
some experience in the field, and at inani- 
mate targets. 

The birds were exceptionally tame, and 
fairly good scores were made, considering 
everything. Following are the figures: 

Gentry 9, Darrow 6—15; Still 8, Patter- 
son 10 — 18. H. C. D., Kirksville, Mo. 



Allow rne to correct the statement of " E. 
L. B.," in June Recreation, in reference 



We have a fish and game association, 
with 34 members. We turned out 10 dozen 
quails last year, and had fine shooting in 
the fall. In 10 minutes after leaving town, 
one afternoon, my dogs were standing a 
large bevy. I killed 6 and returned, being 
gone only an hour. If we had more sports- 
men who would turn out birds in the 
spring, use common sense and not try to 
kill them all in one day, no one would have 
to take a week every fall to kill a few birds. 
W. H. C, Dunellen, N. J. 

* It is not unusual for quails to light in trees ; but it is 
unsportsmanlike to shoot any bird while sitting in a tree 
or on the ground. — Editor. 



138 



RECREA TION. 



We have all kinds of game here, and it is 
on the increase, excepting deer. Quails 
have increased 50 per cent, in the last 5 
years, owing, perhaps, to the law prohibit- 
ing killing them for 5 years. 

Would say to A. M. C. I am using a 16 
gauge gun, and for small game, such as 
rabbits, grouse, and ducks, I find it equal to 
a 10 or 12 gauge. 

In answer to G. M. C, in regard to Red 
lake, Minn. — there are ducks, geese, deer, 
grouse, chickens and rabbits in that 
vicinity. 

I am getting some subscribers for Rec- 
reation, for I think it the best magazine 
published. E. W. D., Augusta, Wis. 



Greater slaughter than was visited on the 
rabbits last season has not been seen in this 
locality for many a year. It was not un- 
common for some of our Indian pupils to 
bring in 6 or 8, each, daily, caught in wire 
snares. Previous years the majority of the 
older hunters thought it beneath their dig- 
nity to go rabbit hunting, but this year 
every one who could shoulder a gun was 
stricken with the rabbit fever. Big game, 
too, was very plentiful. 

The Indians report that the deep snow 
had little effect on deer and moose; but 
when thick crust forms after the snow be- 
gins to melt, destruction comes to them 
from the game hogs who prowl about the 
reservation. K. H. C., Leech, Minn. 



In the vicinity of Hammonds Plains, 
this Province, as good woodcock shooting 
can be had as in any place I know of. That 
is about 15 miles from Halifax. Ed Thomp- 
son, of Hammonds Plains, and I have 
bagged, in one day, 15 cocks and 10 ruffed 
grouse. 

There is good moose shooting near here; 
also fine fishing. Trout are taken weighing 
4 and 5 pounds. During June, July and 
August, sportsmen can generally kill good 
numbers. C. F. R., Halifax, N. S. 



About the middle of March I saw a deer 
cross the Delaware, at this place. The river 
was high and full of running ice. The little 
buck plunged in, swam a short distance, 
then clambered up on a cake of ice. In this 
way, swimming and floating, he crossed; 
-but a crowd of boys started for him. The 
buck turned and plunged in again; swam 
to the New York shore, where he was once 
more scared into the water. This time he 
drifted down the stream, probably making 
good his escape. This was the first deer 
seen here in a long time. 
Louis Boettger, Callicoon Depot, N. Y. 



Texas is a big state, and a good field for 
missionary work in sports. I think the best 
way is to get Recreation well circulated. 
It will undoubtedly do the rest. 

Quails are abundant here, but trapping 



is thinning them out rapidly. There is a 
restaurant keeper here who kept about 2 
dozen live quails in his window all winter, 
killing and serving them whenever called 
for; the supply being kept up by his game 
hog accomplices. I never went past the 
place that I did not feel like smashing the 
window — and the proprietor too. I would 
like to see the guilty parties roasted, brown. 
The English language is too poor to ex- 
press my sentiments. 

G. A., Ft. Worth, Texas. 

I am willing to stop spring shooting if 
laws are passed prohibiting it; but I hope 
a law limiting the number of ducks killed, 
in the fall, will pass first. Some bags we 
read of being made, down in Texas, ought 
to start an army down there with guns; 
not to shoot game but game hogs. 

I would like to see a national law passed, 
limiting the amount of game to be killed 
or held in possession, at one time, to 1 deer, 
5 geese, 10 ducks or grouse and 20 quails. 
Would not all sportsmen be benefited by 
it? E. S. Billings, Syracuse, N. Y. 



I greatly enjoy reading Recreation, and 
look for its coming each month. We have 
many sportsmen here, and a good many 
game hogs. I know one man who killed 
over 90 grouse last fall. If our game is not 
protected, in the near future, it will soon 
be as scarce as eels' feet. We have excellent 
duck shooting here, from about the first of 
September till about the middle of October. 
My favorite hunting ground is along the 
shores of the beautiful Richelieu river. 

Some good catches of fish have lately 
been made. E. G. F., Noyan, P. Que. 



We have just organized a gun club, of 20 
members, in our ward, and have named it 
the Recreation Gun Club. We have had 
quite a discussion in the club as to the 
proper drop of a gun. An answer from 
some of the readers of Recreation would 
be appreciated. 

F. W. Kutz, Easton, Pa. 

I thank you, gentlemen, most heartily, 
for the honor you have conferred on Rec- 
reation, in the choice of a name for your 
club, and it affords me great pleasure to 
send you herewith a handsome flag, appro- 
priately inscribed. Editor. 

A den of red .foxes was unearthed, from 
a hay stack near here, recently. Five pup- 
pies were found and the old ones were 
seen, but they kept just out of gun range. 
The finders intend to domesticate the little 
fellows, which appear to be about 4 weeks 
old. 

Bob Whites, pinnated grouse and fox 
squirrels are plentiful. I flushed 3 ruffed 
grouse a few days ago in the woods near 
my residence. Sangamon, Ellsworth, 111. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



139 



I would like to say a few words about 
game protection. I see the different states 
are passing laws limiting the number of 
deer to be killed or held in possession, at 
one time. This is right. It strikes directly 
at the game hog and the market shooter, 
alike. I favor neither but consider the 
market shooter the better of the 2. 

I read a great deal about spring duck 
shooting. Some men go out in the fall 
and kill 20 or more birds in a day. Would 
it not be better for that man's health if 
he went out one day in the fall, and killed 
10 ducks, then stopped and killed the other 
10 some day the next spring? Would it 
be any worse on the ducks, provided shoot- 
ing was stopped. after April 1st, before the 
ducks begin to nest? 



It would please all true sportsmen if 
these game hogs would, when they so long 
to slaughter something, adopt the same 
plan we did, last Saturday, at the Wood- 
land Gun Club grounds, and scatter in- 
animate targets all over a 5-acre lot. When 
this was done there was just as much game 
in old Connecticut as before and we were 
just as happy as if we had killed 100 birds. 

The following scores were made, out of 
a possible 50: Burbridge, 49; Bisley, 47; 
O. B. Treat, 44; Lucas, 44; Geiselman, 43; 
Cushman, 42; See, 36; Owen Treat, 35; 
F. Olmstead, 33; Pitkin, 27, and Water- 
man, 27. 

Geo. W. Lucas, Hartford, Conn. 



I live in a nice little city, at the highest 
point of the Ozark mountains, in South 
Missouri. We have nearly all kind? of 
small game, i.e., foxes, coons, 'possums, 
red and gray squirrels, quails, ruffed grouse, 
turkeys, minks, and some deer. The 
streams furnish plenty of fish, both for 
home and shipping. There are bass, pick- 
erel, cat, suckers, red-horse, perch, buffalo 
and carp. The game laws are so strict as 
not to allow much chance for " game hogs." 

Recreation is the best sportsmen's book 
published. 

T. A. Chapman, Mountain Grove, Mo. 



Game in this locality wintered well. 
Mountain sheep are seen here quite often. 
Last spring the swans sat around on the ice 
for over a month, waiting for the lake to 
thaw out. They fed in the creeks at night. 
They get very weak, and it was sometimes 
possible to catch them in the creeks, as they 
could not rise without having 50 yards of 
straight course. I think Recreation is 
getting better all the time. I could not do 
without it. J. B., Magdalen, Mont. 



charter members. The following officers 
were elected: President, H. P. Bennett; 
Vice-President, C. B. Woolley; Secretary, 
C. L. Edwards; Treasurer, H. G. Woolley; 
Captain, H. C. Mapes, Jr. 

The new club will shoot on the Kensing- 
ton Park grounds. 

Chas. L. Edwards, Long Branch, N. J. 



I have been so busy this spring I went 
hunting only twice. Got 2 ducks each time, 
but as spring shooting is not a good thing 
to engage in, I am not sorry I did not kill 
more. The prospects for fishing and huntn 
ing, the coming season, are good. 

Enclosed find $1 for renewal to Recrea- 
tion. Can't do without it. 

J. J. McN., Cimarron, Col. 



I am an enthusiastic sportsman, but have 
had no outing for 3 years, except to wheel 
15 or 20 miles, occasionally, and to shoot 
gophers with a little Winchester 22. In the 
winter I hunt rabbits, with the same rifle, 
just after a light snow. There is worse fun 
than that, when a fellow can get nothing 
better. A. McE., St. Paul, Minn. 



We have not much game here, owing to 
the game laws not being enforced. The 
foreigners, who work in the glass factories, 
from lack of information or with no regard 
for the laws, kill game at all seasons. I 
have known some of our enlightened 
American citizens to do the same. 

J. H. C, Springdale, Pa. 



I am interested in game and its preser- 
vation. This part of Colorado was at one 
time full of game, but the redskins and 
game hogs have thinned it out. We have 
a new game warden who means business. 
Perhaps things will improve. 

R. B., Durango, Col. 



I like Recreation, as does everyone 
who once reads it. Good duck shooting on 
the lakes and ponds along the Big Muddy 
last season. Market was glutted with mal- 
lard, teal, and other wild fowl all the time. 
G. A. H., Kansas City, Mo. 



Several deer have been seen here this 
winter. Ruffed grouse are very plentiful, 
but Bob Whites are scarce. These, with 
foxes and rabbits, are our only game. 

H. B. B., Kent, Conn. 



The Kensington Gun Club was organized 
here, on Wednesday, May 12th, with 20 



Please send me the names and addresses 
of all the sportsmen of your acquaintance, 
in order that I may send them sample 
copies of Recreation. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



TROUT CULTURE IN MONTANA. 

Editor Recreation: I am thinking of 
starting a private fish hatchery here soon, 
and intend to raise various kinds of trout, 
land-locked salmon, and grayling. 

What is the best trout to stock with? 
The ones that grow quickest and to the 
largest size, are what I want. 

I also want some books on fish culture, 
in all its stages. What are the best books 
on this subject? 

I think of stocking my pond with black 
bass, also, but understand they and trout 
cannot live together. Will you kindly tell 
me if this is so? 

W. Plunkett, Toston, Mont. 

I referred this letter to Prof. B. W. Ever- 
mann, who replies as follows: 

" Nearly all the species of trout will do 
well in the waters of Southwestern Mon- 
tana. The native species, the cut-throat 
trout, will do especially well. In addition, 
I would recommend such of the other va- 
rieties of that species as he can get. Among 
them are the Columbia river trout, Rio 
Grande trout, Colorado river trout, Yel- 
low-finned trout, etc. 

" The Rainbow trout {Salmo irideus) is 
one of the most hardy and most rapid 
growers. The grayling and the Rocky 
mountain whitefish are excellent fishes to 
experiment with. The black bass should 
not, of course, be put in the same ponds 
with trout, if you want the trout to live. 

" Here is a list of the more important 
books on fish culture." 

" Domesticated Trout : How to Breed and Grow 
Them," by Livingston Stone. For sale at Cold Spring 
Trout Ponds, Charleston, New Hampshire. Fourth Edi- 
tion, 1891. 

"Practical Trout Culture," by J. H. Slack, M.D. For 
sale by The American News Company, 41 Chambers St., 
N. Y. 

" Fish Hatching and Fish Catching," by Seth Green and 
R. B. Roosevelt. Union and Advertiser, Rochester. N. Y. 

" Trout Culture," by Seth Green. For sale by Morey & 
Co., Rochester, N. Y, 

" Artificial Propagation of Fish," by Theodatus Garlick. 
For sale by J. B. Savage, Franklyn St., Cleveland. Ohio. 

" American Fish Culture, 1 ' Thaddeus Norris, Porter & 
Coates, Philadelphia. Pa. 

"Fish Culture," by Francis Francis, 128 Grand St., 
N. Y. 

" The Goldfish and its Culture," by Hugo Mulertt, 173 
Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

"The Amateur Aquarist," by Mark Samuel, 10 E. Six- 
teenth St., New York. 

" Carp Culture," by L. B. Logan, Youngstown, Ohio. 

" The History of Howietoun," by Sir Ramsey Gibson 
Maitland. For sale by J. R. Guy, Sec. Howietoun Fishery, 
Stirling, N. B. 

"An Angler's Paradise," by J. J. Armistead. For sale 
by Wm. Wesley & Son, 28 Essex St., Strand, London, 
W. C. England. 

" The U. S. Fish Commission will soon 
publish special reports, or manuals, on the 
culture of several species of trout. They 
will be just what Mr. Plunkett will want, 



and I shall have copies sent him as soon 
as they are published. 

" Mr. Plunkett will find it helpful to visit 
the U. S. Fish Hatchery at Bozeman, 
Mont., and to confer with the Supt., Dr. 
Henshall." 



In reply to Professor Evermann Mr. 
Plunkett writes again: 

Editor Recreation: Your letter, enclos- 
ing Prof. Evermann's, and list of books on 
Fish Culture, received to-day. 

In Helena there is a great demand for 
Eastern brook trout, and they command 
nearly double the price paid for Montana 
trout. Under these circumstances I should 
like to stock my pond with these fish, and 
should like to know if they would do well 
here. Could I obtain yearlings, from the 
Government, to stock my pond with? How 
many fish can be kept healthy (without 
feeding) in a pond 300 yards long by 100 to 
150 yards wide, with a depth of 20 feet at the 
lower end and sloping back to nothing? 
The pond is fed by spring water, and has a 
steady flow, in and out. It has also an 
abundance of natural food — small snails, 
etc. W. Plunkett. 

To this second letter Professor Ever- 
mann replies: 

" I have no doubt the Eastern brook 
trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) would do well 
in Mr. Plunkett's pond. The experience 
of the Commission indicates that he would 
have no trouble in rearing them in that 
region. The number he can keep will de- 
pend largely on the abundance of natural 
food in the pond. With plenty of food, 
such a pond would accommodate at least 
600 to 1,000 adult fish; but this question 
of food will be an important one. 

" I can not say whether he would be able 
to get a supply of yearlings from the Fish 
Commission or not; but would advise him 
to send to the Commissioner for blanks, on 
which to make his request for the fish. 
When he receives the blanks he should fill 
them in and forward to the Commissioner 
through his Congressman." 



EXCESSIVE CATCHES. 

Carritunk, Me. 
On May 28th I went to Indian Pond to 
meet Mr. W. Y. Wadleigh and Mr. A. E. 
Wheaton, of Boston, who were making 
their annual fishing trip to Mike Marr's 
camps; but owing to the high water and 
poor fishing we only remained there 2 days. 
We then went to Parlin Pond, where N. W. 
Murphy has a fine sportsmen's hotel. We 
arrived there June 1st and caught 20 trout, 
in one hour, in the afternoon. Wednesday 



140 



FISH AND FISHING. 



141 



we went in to Grace Pond, 5 miles from 
Parlin, where Mr. Murphy has some good 
log cabins for the accommodation of his 
guests. Wednesday afternoon Messrs. 
VVadleigh and Wheaton took 120 trout, in 
one hour. Thursday, in 3 hours, they took 
130 trout. Friday morning they took 162 
trout, and returned to Parlin Pond in the 
afternoon. All the trout were taken with 
the fly. Grace Pond is one of the best fish- 
ing Ponds in Maine. I have seen 100 trout 
taken there, on the fly, in one hour. These 
trout are not large — running from 1 pound 
down — but they are very gamy. 

On this trip we saw 26 deer, 5 of which 
were seen from the hotel at Parlin Pond, 
where they come to feed, in the fields, night 
and morning. Deer are increasing rapidly, 
owing to the light snow last winter, and to 
the vigilance of the game wardens. 

Geo. C. Jones. 

Please note the statement that on 
Wednesday afternoon Messrs. Wadleigh 
and Wheaton took 120 trout, in one hour. 
This is, we will say, 60 to each man, or one 
trout each minute to each man. What kind 
of fishing is that? It reads as if the men 
" yanked " the fish out, yanked the fly from 
their mouths and returned it to the water 
as quickly as possible. That is not the way 
sportsmen fish. 

Further: Mr. Jones says these men took 
120 trout on Wednesday, 130 on Thursday 
and 62 on Friday — a total of 412 trout for 2 
men in 3 days. What kind of fishing do 
you call that? In what department of the 
animal kingdom do these men belong? 
Will the class in Natural history please 
answer? Editor. 



IS THE BULL-HEAD THE REAL OFFENDER? 

New York.- 

Editor Recreation: I noticed on page 
372, of May Recreation that " E.C." says 
" a man caught 200 bull-heads in one after- 
noon." This statement elicited the remark 
from you, that he should be branded as a 
fish-hog. If those 200 fish were trout, or 
even pickerel, there might have been some 
excuse for your censure; but as it stands, 
I don't think there was. 

I had the pleasure of spending all of last 
summer in the Adirondacks, at Indian lake, 
Franklin County, where fair trout fishing 
is to be had, by going some distance for it 
There was a time, not very long ago, when 
the lake was simply filled to overflowing 
with trout; but about 6 years ago, some 
short-sighted person emptied 2 pailfulls of 
bull-heads into that lake, and now where 
are the trout? 

m The spawn of the trout has a peculiar fas- 
cination for bull-heads, and this is the 
cause of the decrease in the quantity of 
trout; while the bull-heads live, multiply 
and continue the work of destruction. 

To be sure, numbers of sportsmen visited 



the lake, during the summer months, and 
helped to rid it of trout; but the bull- 
heads are the principal offenders. 

Now, Mr. Editor, if these bull-heads are 
not " fish-hogs," who are? If the lake, " E. 
C." speaks of, is as full of bull-heads as 
Indian lake is, there is no fear that human 
hands will ever rid the place of them. They 
are, also, a constant nuisance to those who 
are fishing for trout, sometimes in their 
greediness even taking the fly. 

Instead of an indirect censure, I think a 
vote of thanks should be extended, by all 
trout loving anglers, to this fisherman, who 
has killed 200 fish-hogs in 1 afternoon. 
Surely his was a most noble day's work. 

It has been plainly shown that trout and 
bull-heads cannot peaceably occupy the 
same waters, and of the 2 which is prefer- 
able for eating and for sport? To show the 
little value of the bull-heads, they are un- 
protected, and, in my mind, it would not be 
going too far to offer a bounty for them. 

I am a close reader of Recreation, and 
like it very much. I especially like the stand 
you have taken against market-hunters, 
game and fish hogs; but in this instance, I 
think the fish itself was the fish-hog. 

W. G. C. 

If the lake in which the man is said to 
have taken the 200 bull-heads is trout water, 
that would put an entirely different phase 
on the subject; but it was not so stated in 
the note referred to. Editor. 



Editor Recreation: Your magazine is 
the best of its class published. In fact, it 
is in a class all its own. But once in a 
while your level head gets wrong. You 
take exception to the appointment of the 
Rev. Z. T. Sweeney as State Fish Commis- 
sioner of Indiana, for some unknown * rea- 
son. You are doing a clever gentleman and 
an ardent sportsman a great injustice. He 
has been in office but a few months, and has 
accomplished great good. He has broken 
up two gangs of dynamiters and seiners, in 
the Northeastern part of Indiana, and has 
captured and destroyed over 100 seines. 
He has compelled a number of factories to 
build fish ladders. This, in addition to ap- 
pointing a good staff of deputies, is his 
record, up to date. 

Give him a chance. He is so far ahead 
of any of his predecessors that the improve- 
ment is noticed already. He will prove the 
best fish protector Indiana ever had. I am 
not personally acquainted with Mr. Swee- 
ney, and am not defending him for any 
reason, other than that his record is such a 
contrast with that of former officers that it 
is deserving of praise. I welcome the 
change. It means that our waters (and 

* I did not object to Mr. Sweeney's appointment, for an 
"unknown reason." My reasons are fully and frankly 
stated on pasres 468 and 469 of Tune Recreation. I am 
deliphted to learn, however, that Mr. Sweeney is doing such 
good work, and heartily commend him for it. — Editor. 



142 



RECREA TION. 



there are none better for game fishes), are 
to be protected if it is in the power of man 
to do so. 

P. W. Roche, Mount Vernon, Ind. 



Why is it no salmon are seen, or caught, 
in a pond which several years ago was 
stocked with both land-locked salmon and 
black bass, the salmon being the larger at 
that time? What is the proper time of 
year to fish for the salmon? What bait is 
best? Is deep or shallow water best for the 
fishing ground? 

Mrs. O. R. Hood, Abingdon, Mass. 

Experience has shown that it is never 
safe to put black bass in the same pond, or 
stream, with any other fish, if you want the 
other fish to live. 

The life of a land-locked salmon is not 
worth much when pitted against that of the 
large-mouthed black bass. In the case men- 
tioned it is impossible to tell just why the 
salmon disappeared, without knowing more 
about the conditions which exist there. 
Granting that the physical conditions were 
equally favorable to salmon and black bass, 
which was probably not the case — then if 
the salmon disappeared they were either 
caught out, or the bass had something to 
do with it. The bass could easily keep any 
salmon that might be hatched in the pond, 
from growing to any size. 

Don't put bass and salmon in the same 
pond. It is hard on the salmon. 

A gentleman who has had much experi- 
ence fishing for land-locked salmon, in 
New England, says the last half of May, 
and during June, is the best time to fish for 
them. They take the fly readily; but are 
also taken with live minnows or smelt. At 
that season they rise to the surface readily 
and can be found in shallow water. 



Editor Recreation: I enclose you a 
newspaper clipping re a big salmon, caught 
in the Columbia river, which will perhaps 
interest your readers and give them an idea 
of the size to which some of our salmon 
grow. 

The largest salmon ever caught in the Columbia river 
was delivered at a packing house at Astoria last week. It 
was a royal chinook salmon and measured, from tip to tip, 4 
feet 5^ inches. Its largest circumference was 3 feet, the 
girth, close to the tail, being fully 1 foot. The spread of 
the tail was 1 foot 4 inches, and the exact weight 81^ lbs. 
The head, when severed from the body, weighed 8%lbs. On 
being cooked and jpacked the fish filled 5^ dozen one-lb. 
cans. 

Some prominent fish dealers tell me 
larger salmon have been caught in these 
waters, but the largest I have seen, weighed 
only 78 pounds. What a shame that such 
a grand specimen of the king of fishes 
should be cut up and canned, instead of 
being preserved, whole, for exhibition! 



tirely unlike the usual fish yarn, it is abso- 
lutely true. The Yellowstone lake, in 
shape", is similar to an open hand. On the 
shore of what is known as the West Thumb 
of the lake, is a small cone-shaped geyser, 
which, like others, gives up its boiling 
water. A wonderful feature of this geyser 
is the fact that it is half covered by the ice- 
cold waters of the lake. On the crest of 
this wonderful little geyser I stood, fishing- 
rod in hand, and, baiting the hook with a 
grasshopper, threw my line into the icy 
waters of the lake, hooked a 3 pound trout, 
reeled it in, dressed it, and with the line in 
hand dropped the fish into the-boiling gey- 
ser, cooked it, and 3 of us ate the fish with- 
out its having left the hook. It took just 
6 minutes to cook the trout, and during 
that time it was pulled out twice in order to 
ascertain whether or not it was sufficiently 
done. During the time consumed in catch- 
ing the fish, dressing and cooking it, I did 
not move 4 feet. 

L. M. E., Salt Lake, Utah. 



I noticed an article in Recreation com- 
menting on a press despatch from Ashland, 
Wis., regarding the fishing on the Brule. 
It is said lumbermen are driving on this 
stream. This is true, and they have driven 
it for the last 8 years; but the lumbering is 
on the lower part, below the clubhouse. 

I live about 11 miles from the head of 
the Brule, on Ox creek, and have been 
here 9 years. Ox creek is 9 miles North- 
east of Gordon station. This stream is as 
good as the Brule. Last spring we caught 
trout that weighed 2^ pounds. A Y-2 pound 
trout is thought a big fish, on the Brule. 

F. B., Gordon, Wis. * 



A paper published at Neenah, Wis., 
says: Will Nelson and E. F. Taylor fished 
yesterday on Lake Winnebago, and made 
the largest catch ever reported by any 2 
fishermen,* for one day's fishing, with the 
spoon hook. The catch included pike, 
black bass and silver bass, and numbered 
in all 246 fish. Johnny Garvey and Cliff. 
Lansing, in an afternoon's fishing of 3^2 
hours succeeded in catching the modest 
number of 77 of like species. Many other 
large catches were reported by all out from 
the Neenah mouth of the Fox, and South- 
ward. 



A short fish story may be excusable, in 
this connection, and while it may be en- 



Denver, Colo., May 28, '97. 
Editor Recreation: I enclose a clipping 
from the Denver Times, which may be of 
interest to Recreation's many readers. 

Justice Hunt this morning found F. Oppenheim, propri- 
etor of a restaurant, guilty of violating the new state game 
law by selling fresh mountain trout and having it on the bill 
of fare. The minimum fine allowed by the law, $25 in each 
case, was assessed, but was remitted by the court on the 

*The reporter should have said " fish hogs" instead of 
" fishermen." — Editor. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



H3 



showing made by defendant's counsel, that the law was not 
yet printed. 

The new law is the most sweeping one, on the subject, in 
any state, and is designed to make Colorado a sportsman's 
paradise. The law prohibits the sale of mountain trout, by 
any hotel or restaurant, at any time of the year, and makes 
it an offense to even print it on a bill of fare. If the fish, as 
in the Oppenheim case, are imported from another state, 
the defendant must show that the fish were lawfully taken, 
according to the laws of the state where the trout were 
caught. This is a difficult matter, as the laws of Utah, 
Wyoming and Idaho are now almost as strict as the new 
Colorado law, and prohibit the exportation of mountain 
trout beyond their respective limits. 

The open season for catching trout, in this state, is from 
June to October, inclusive. They must be caught by hook 
and line, all other methods being punishable by heavy fines. 
From the public waters of the state they can only be caught 
for consumption, and no one person can take to exceed 20 
pounds in one day. 

I hope our new Fish Commissioner will 
be as zealous throughout his term as he is 
now. C. E. Rich. 



The unusually high water, in the Wall- 
kill river, has receded from the meadows, 
leaving hundreds of German carp stranded 
on the lowlands. They have adapted them- 
selves to circumstances, are drawing 
around themselves little patches of leaves, 
and, like robins, are nesting. It is no un- 
common sight to see the males going from 
nest to nest, and looking after the eggs, 
to insure the hatching process. 

The females seem content in their nests, 
while the males bring them food. They do 
not seem to mind the change, from water 
to dry land, and are getting along nicely 
out of their natural element; the occasional 
rain storms being sufficient to keep them 
in good condition. 

This looks as if we were never going to 
be rid of this inferior fish. 

Any adverse comments, on this article, 
by carping critics, will be resented. 

Biff, Middletown, N. Y. 



Spirit Lake, la. 

Editor Recreation: The hotels and the 
fishing season opened here on May 15th. 
The fishing is better than last year, as a 
result of the law having been enforced. 
Bass, wall-eyed pike, croppies, pickerel and 
perch, have been taken in good numbers. 

With 2 railroads running directly from 
Chicago, sportsmen are enabled to reach 
our lakes very conveniently. 

This was an ideal hunting and fishing- 
ground for the Indians; no wonder they 
objected to leaving it. Here, too, the 
mound - builders lived and built their 
mounds. 

Recreation comes regularly. It is the 
best of all the sportsmen's journals! That 
is saying a good deal, but not too much. 

M. 



in our locality, there are probably many 
readers of Recreation to whom they are 
strangers. These islands, with numerous 
smaller ones, form a group at the upper 
end of Lake Erie. Around them, and on 
the adjacent reefs, bass congregate, in May 
and September. 

The middle of last May, C and I left 

Sandusky, Ohio, by steamer, for Kelley's 
island, where we arrived toward evening. 
By 6.30 the next morning we commenced 
to fish. 

Trolling with spoon or live minnows is 
the way most of the fishing is done. We 
used live bait, Bristol steel rods and heavy 
sinkers. Fishing until the middle of the 
afternoon, we took 25 bass, ranging in 
weight from one to 4 pounds. 

C. V. W., Sandusky, O. 



Please settle a dispute between me and a 
friend. 

Is there any tarpon, or other fish, caught 
with rod and reel, weighing 100 pounds or 
over? Has there ever been one caught 
with rod and reel so large? 

Yes, a great many fish, weighing 100 
pounds and upward, have been caught with 
rod and reel. A few tarpon have been thus 
taken thai weighed over 200 pounds. In 
the Gulf of Mexico, and at Santa Catalina 
Island, jew fish and horse mackerel are 
sometimes taken, with rod and reel, weigh- 
ing upward of 200 pounds; though these 
very large fish are usually taken with hand 
lines. 

Of course, special tackle is required for 
such fishing. The tarpon rod is usually 
not more than 6y 2 feet in length and is 
often a half inch in diameter at the tip. A 
large reel is used, holding 200 to 300 yards 
of 15 thread line. There is not much spring 
in such a rod, when •simply testing it by 
hand, yet a 200 pound fish will bend it 
into a half circle. Editor. 



Although the names of Pelee, Put-in bay. 
Old Hen, Middle, and Kelleys islands, and 
the splendid fishing near them, are known 



In reply to inquiry of W. B. McE., Mar- 
shall, N. C, I will give my experience of 
7 years ago on Big Horicon, Little Hori- 
con, Shut In, Pigeon river, Catalouche 
creek and Deep creek — all in the mountains 
of N. C. 

Although I fished only in the early 
spring, I took good catches from each of 
these streams. I advise him to get a 6-oz. 
fly rod, good reel, light oil silk line, and 
a few each of Black Gnat, Brown Hackle, 
White Miller, Professor. Silver Doctor, 
Dark Montreal and Red Ibis flies. Those 
tied on No. 8 hooks are a good average 
size, where only a limited stock is carried. 

I carry about 2 gross, tied on sizes 8 to 
16, and have had good success with the 
small flies, when trout would not rise to 
the larger ones. R. P. B., Rutland, Vt. 



144 



RECREA TTON. 



What do you think of this: A special 
from Peshtigo, this State, to the morning 
papers says, apparently with pride, that the 
farmers in that vicinity have found a new 
fertilizer. They go to the lakes and rivers, 
with teams and dip nets, and catch thou- 
sands of suckers. A few of these are eaten, 
but the remainder are thrown on the farms 
for fertilizing purposes. 

The State fish commissioners have placed 
millions of trout, pickerel and the like in 
streams throughout the State. 

Here is another: 

Local fishermen think they have found a way to evade 
the new fish law. They allow their consignments of 
dressed fish to be seized and sold at auction, buying them 
back at about 80 cents a hundred lbs. They are then 
shipped to Chicago, netting the consignor $5 to $6 a hun- 
dred. About 8,000 pounds of fish were handled this way 
last week. x 

The law makers must try again. 

L. J., Marshfield, Wis. 

I enclose $i, which I wish to add to the 
fund for the poor children of your city. 
We are blessed with such quantities of pure 
air, beautiful flowers and birds, up here, one 
forgets the dark corners of our domain. If 
10 cents helps one of His unfortunates, 10 
of us here wish to aid 10 with you. We 
thank you for calling our attention to the 
little ones. 

I heard of a fish hog catching 200 trout, 
in a near-by county, recently. The state in- 
spector is looking up the case. It may not 
have been done regularly, you know; and 
it is well to be positive, for it is exasperat- 
ing to a fellow who gets his ^> dozen a trip, 
and charges up the balance of his recrea- 
tion to pure air and a clear conscience. 
Dr. W. A. H., Owego, N. Y. 



We have good fishing in the Hocking 
river. Although there are no trout or salm- 
on, we have some game fishes, such as 
black bass, pike, and perch. The latter are 
just beginning to bite, while the bass rise to 
the fly frequently. 

The river was recently stocked with sev- 
eral varieties of fish. I hope they will be 
protected, and think they will, as the State 
game warden has been severe on some of 
the violators of the law in this vicinity. 
Last week he had 5 fellows arrested for 
spearing fish. They were fined $25 each 
for their fun. W. B. C, Athens, O. 



A party consisting of F. A. & G. E. 
Pearsons, of Vt., Guy C. Dewey and me, 
while -fishing at Wardner's, Rainbow lake, 
a few weeks ago caught the largest brook 
trout that has been taken in the Adiron- 
dacks for some years. It weighed 4 pounds, 
2 ounces and measured 21 inches in length 
and 13 inches around. Mr. G. E. Pearsons 
was the lucky angler and Mr. Dewey 
handled the landing net. 

F. J. Taylor, Malone, N. Y. 



The West branch of the Brandywine af- 
fords as" good fly fishing, for black bass, as 
any stream in Eastern Pennsylvania. This 
is known to fishermen of Reading, Wil- 
mington and West Chester; and scarcely 
a day goes by during the season, when rep- 
resentatives from some one of these cities 
are not along the stream. The bass are 10 
to 14 inches in length, and hard fighters. 
Lenape, West Chester, Pa. 



The trout season opened in this section 
with rain and high water. Few fish were 
caught in the near by streams, but a friend 
and I went to Clark's creek, 10 miles from 
here, and caught 39 good ones. Most of 
them averaged 11 inches long. We expect 
the fishing will be good from now on. 

W. V. B., Lykens, Pa. 



Where can I buy good trout flies, and 
artificial minnows? 

S. B., Denver, Col. 

You can get good flies, made to order, 
from Dr. Wm. Greenshields, Romeo, 
Mich., and minnows, or other fishing 
tackle, from Cornwall & Jesperson. These 
people advertise in Recreation and are 
thoroughly reliable. Editor. 



Herewith I hand you a clipping from one 
of our evening papers, of recent date. 
Would you call them successful fishermen, 
or game hogs? 

X. Y. Z., Williamsport, Pa. 

John Washam, John Updegraff, John Thomas, John 
Herman and James Updegraff returned last night from a 
10 days 1 fishing trip through Potter county. They fished 
Slate run, Kettle creek and Youngwoman's creek and 
caught over 1,200 trout. 

These are of the genus swinus icthus. 

Editor. 



A correspondent writing from Eagle 
river, Wis., says: "A. Balaman caught a 
10 pound muskalonge, and W. O. Connor 
caught one weighing 16 pounds, in Yellow 
Birch lake. -M. Frankel caught 21 pike, in 
2 hours, in Cranberry lake." 



Hundreds of pickerel are being caught 
here, and some large ones have been 
taken, the largest weighing 16 pounds. 
Two Mauston boys recently caught 75 
trout. F. V., Mauston, Wis. 



Have been taking a rest, and incidentally 
catching trout, 8 to 13^ inches long. Will 
get up another club for Recreation soon. 
M. V., Lykens, N. Y. 



We have good trout fishing here. 

J. E. B., Dingman's Ferry, Pa. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



BIG BORES FOR BIG GAME. 
R. S. B. 

Editor Recreation: I wish to corrob- 
orate what Mr. E. E. Van Dyke says. Also 
to help him out of a slight error he made in 
stating that the penetration of the 45~75- 
405 cartridge is nearly one-half greater 
than that of the 45-90-300. I have looked 
up some data and present 5 types of guns 
for comparison. 



lations between different guns I take up 
the last 2 as representing the extremes of 
large and small bores. The united energy 
of the guns, in foot pounds, would be rep- 
resented by formula 

p y a in which P is the weight of ball in pounds. 

it 1. y n <t velocity in feet per sec. 

2-0 " " 9 = 32.16 gravity. 

Which worked out for No. 4 gives 2092 foot pounds. 

<< » .« s <• 2308 " 

Thus showing that No. 5 has the greater power again. 
But the energy per inch of cir. of ball would be repre- 



No. 









Velocity ft. 








per sec. 


I, 


45- 


70. 405- 


1271 


2, 


45- 


90 300. 


1480 


3i 


40. 


90 370 


1357 






(U. S. new 


navy.) 


4- 


.236. 


i35 


2306 


5. 


50. 


105. 450 


1383 



-Penetrations. 



14. y % " boards plain ball. 16%. V B. patched ball 

13' 19- 

16 " " " " 23 



16" 



62 
23 



Momentum. 


90 


ft. 


lbs 


77 


" 


" 


89.7 


it 


it 


56 


" 


it 


125 


11 


it 



By looking at the table some queer com- 
parisons are to be seen. No. 3, the old 
Sharps, was my ideal rifle. Mr. Van Dyke 
uses Nos. 1 and 2 and says the new No. 5 
would be his ideal. I claim that No. 3 was 
the best rifle, 10 to 15 years ago, for my 
use on the plains and in the foot hills. Mr. 
Van Dyke's ideal is a little larger. Prob- 
ably he can carry a cannon better than I 
could; but his gun has the same penetra- 
tion, in pine wood, as mine. I admit Mr. 
Van Dyke has picked the better of the 2, 
as it is the gun that has the most power 
with loads given, as shown in the column 
of momentums; and just here is where the 
whole business centres. The fine adjust- 
ment of powder charge, gauge, and weight 
of ball, granting the gup perfect in other 
respects for certain resistance is admirable. 
No one gun is adapted for all kinds of 
shooting. 

The various governments have been try- 
ing, for years, to produce the best gun to 
kill men. Now it seems they want to do it 
in a nice, gentlemanly way — by pushing 
lead pencils through them. No. 4 in the 
above table is that kind of a gun. It has 
high velocity, great penetration and is sup- 
posed to revolve a ball so rapidly that it 
will tear a large hole. Granted. But if that 
gun were given to me, or I dare say to Mr. 
Van Dyke, and we were ordered to go 
hunting with it, we would look for nothing 
larger than jack rabbits. You all seem to 
overlook the fact that it is not the ball that 
does the killing. It is the resistance the 
animal presents to said ball that determines 
whether or not he is to yield to it. If the 
nerve centres, or main nerve cords are pen- 
etrated, you will paralyze and kill your 
game in a much more humane manner than 
by letting him bleed to death, and you are 
more sure to get him. 

To continue the research as to the re- 



sented by formula 



PV2 

292 r ir 



in which P, V & 9 are the same 



as above, r=radius of ball in inches and ^=3.1416. 

Worked out we have for No. 4 2851 foot pounds per inch of 
circumference of ball. 

Worked out we have for No. 5 1841 foot pounds per inch of 
circumference of ball. 

The circumference of No. 4 ball is .-j-/' or area .04 sq. in. 
" 5 " 1.25" " " 1. 21 " ". 

The area of No. 5 ball is nearly 3 times that 
of No. 4. 

Now as to results in killing animals. 
That depends on the elasticity or resistance 
of the parts struck; and on this point we 
have as yet no reliable coefficients by which 
to work out formulas. 

Referring again to the table: The known 
penetration of pine boards is as follows: 

For No. 4, 62%" boards, 54.25 inches X .04 sq. in. = 2.i7 
cu. in. clean hole cut. 

For No. 5, 23% // boards, 20.125 inches X 121 sq. in. = 2.43 
cu. in. of clean hole cat. 

Thus it is seen that No. 5 has actually cut 
or penetrated more area of wood, or the 
wood has presented more resistance than 
to the No. 4 ball; but it is claimed that No. 
4 will cut a larger hole in proportion than 
No. 5. The increase in size is due to the 
plug of material carried ahead of the ball 
having a tendency to spread out; as a log 
or boat propelled through the water forces 
water ahead of it; this being retained by the 
pressure of the side water, till this accumu- 
lation of bow water overcomes the resis- 
tance of the side water, when it passes off 
in bow waves. The sharper your cut water, 
and the finer your boat lines, the less re- 
sistance is presented by the water to the 
propelling force of the boat; and this is 
certainly true of your ball. The twist of 
the ball does not increase the size of hole 
very much. Old hunters use soft nose, 
hollow, or quartered point bullets. Or they 
cut the point by casting around a piece of 



145 



146 



RECREA TION. 



ipaper in the mould, so as to cause the ball 
to flatten or mushroom, thereby making a 
larger wound. 

I read all the articles on guns and ammu- 
nition in Recreation, and am much inter- 
ested in them. I agree with Mr. R. W. K. 
as to hitting the brain. His gun may be 
good enough for him but I will tell you 
what I saw of it. It was in the early 8o's. 
I was on Ten Mile creek, Colorado, look- 
ing after some mines. Some friends of 
mine, from New York, wanted to come out 
and look at the mines, and have a bear 
hunt; so I told them to come. 

At last they showed up, each with a 
beautiful 44-40-200 Winchester. One morn- 
ing I heard their guns going as fast as they 
could work them. I ran down the moun- 
tain to get sight of the performance. As 
soon as the old bear saw me, he made 
straight for me, in no very good humor. 
I did not encourage him nor do a thing to 
him, till he got within 15 yards of me. I 
then pulled down fine on his frontal, and 
handed him my card, endorsed by " old 
reliable " 40-90-370 Sharps. He received 
the same in the brain and sat down. We 
all sat on him and talked of " old reliable " 
and its work. They had hit the bear 8 
times — I hit him once. 



30-40 VS. 45 "9°* 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Editor Recreation: I saw, in May 
Recreation, the article " Big Bores for 
Big Game " and should like to tell of my 
experience with large and small bore rifles. 

I have always used a 45-90 and it does its 
work well. Have found it good for all 
game, from a woodchuck up to a moose; 
but of late— since the 30-40' s and 30-30' s 
have become so popular I have studied 
these guns with great care and interest. 
From the tests I have made of them, I have 
been convinced and have lain aside my 
45-90 — probably for ever. 

To consider each point of advantage in 
the small bores, over those of the 45-9A is 
the only way in which to thoroughly un- 
derstand them. 

First: The 45-90 weighs 10^ to 11 
pounds, when loaded; while the 30-40 
Winchester, box magazine, weighs but 8 
pounds. 

Second: There is great difference in the 
recoil of the 2 guns. 

Third: The flat trajectory of the 30-40, 
as compared with that of the 45-90. The 
trajectory, or drop, of a 45-90 ball, in 300 
yards, is 27.25 inches; while that of the 
30-40 is but 14.14 inches. A man with a 
45 calibre must calculate his distance on a 
deer carefully; and if his calculation be 
wrong he makes a clean miss. With the 



30-40 all he has to do is to shoot well up 
on the shoulder and if he misses it's be- 
cause he didn't hold steady. 

The little steel cased missile travels 
through space with a velocity of 2,06^ feet 
a second; while that of the 45-70 and 45-90 
is between 1,170 and 1,480 feet a second. 
High velocity materially adds to the pene- 
tration. The 30-40 has a penetration of 
58 dry pine boards; while the 45-90 cuts 
through but 19. 

Another thing which is greatly to the 
advantage of the hunter is the lack of 
smoke, in the use of the small gun. I have 
had the cloud of smoke, from my 45-90, 
hang so long after firing that I have lost 
many a deer that might have fallen to my 
second shot, had I had a smokeless rifle. 

An important question as to the 30-40 is 
its power to kill. From the tests I have 
made I can truthfully say these are amaz- 
ing. My first test was on an old horse, 
which I first shot through the head. The 
bullet entered a little to the right of the 
centre of the head. The skull was smashed 
to atoms. We were unable to locate the 
ball, which cut through the neck and must 
have lodged somewhere in the shoulders. 

After propping up the carcass I shot once 
through the pouch and once through the 
shoulders, and the results were wonderful. 
The ball that passed through the pouch 
never touched a bone. The hole where it 
entered was hardly discernible but on the 
other side we found a hole iy 2 to 2 inches 
in diameter. The ball fired into the shoul- 
ders passed through them, making a ghast- 
ly wound and breaking the bones of both 
shoulders. We recovered one of these 
balls and it was mushroomed to the size of 
a 45 or 50 calibre. 

I agree with Mr. Van Dyke that the 22, 
32, 38 and 40 black powder cartridges are 
too small for big game. They have not 
the necessary power of penetration. Some 
one may ask why a 38-55 or 40-70 has not 
the power of a 30-40. This is easily an- 
swered, when you consider that 40 grains 
of smokeless powder is equal to 100 grains 
of black. You can easily see where a 30 
calibre ball gets its velocity and penetra- 
tion. 

Mr. Van Dyke let a fortune slip through 
his fingers when he neglected to preserve 
the heart of the elk he shot, with his 45-90, 
and that ran over 100 yards. His story 
sounds fishy, when medical men claim that 
if the heart be punctured with a needle it 
causes paralysis and instant death.* 

I would like to hear from some one else 
who has used and tried this 30-40 gun. 

Syracuse. 

* Mr. Van Dyke's story is not in the least improbable. 
No modern medical man so far as I know, makes any 
such claim. There are plenty of instances on record, of 
large animals having run ioo or 200 yards after being shot 
through the heart. — Editor. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION 



147 



REPEATING SHOT GUNS. 

In answer to A. H. W., Amarillo, Tex., 
regarding the use of the Winchester re- 
peating shot gun, I will give my experience 
for what it is worth. 

About 12 years ago, when the Winches- 
ter repeating lever action shot gun made 
its debut, I fell in love with it, and bought 
one. I used it several years, with perfect 
satisfaction. Then I swapped it for an- 
other gun. 

During the next few years I used 3 or 4 
makes of double guns, both hammer and 
hammerless, until the Winchester company 
brought out a shotgun with a forestock ac- 
tion. This struck me as being a good 
thing; so I bought one of the first pair 
that came to Southern California. I had a 
gunsmith cut off 3 inches of the barrel, 
at the muzzle, as I wanted the gun prin- 
cipally for use on quails and doves. It was 
a good shooter and many a duck has it 
brought down, at 50 to 60 yards, with No. 
8 shot. The barrel was now only 27 inches 
long, with cylinder bore. 

This gun had but one fault. It would 
balk, by jamming the cartridges, just when 
I needed it most. The Winchester people 
have now entirely overcome this fault, by 
the adoption of a cartridge guide which 
makes the passage of the cartridges, from 
the magazine to the barrel, sure and posi- 
tive. 

Last year I went on an expedition into 
Old Mexico, and lower Southern Califor- 
nia. On this trip I took a later and im- 
proved Winchester shot gun, with a fore- 
stock action and with barrel cut off. The 
way it would bring down quails and doves 
would do any sportsman's heart good. Sev- 
eral times I stood on one spot, and with- 
out moving from my tracks killed 4 and 
5 birds, in almost as many seconds. On 
this Mexican trip we sent home, to friends, 
several bags of birds, of which the little 
pump gun could rightly claim a large per- 
centage as its share. 

I now have gone back to my old and first 
love, a Winchester lever action. It is the 
ideal action for me. Well balanced, easily 
operated, quick and sure. If you will only 
use a gun like this, with the barrel cut off 
one or 2 inches, and regularly read Recre- 
ation you will always get more game than 
any one else in the party. Jack Beldin. 



AS TO LYMAN SIGHTS. 

Helena, Montana. 

Editor Recreation: In your issue of 
May I noticed a query, by one of your 
many readers, as to the virtue of peep 
sights on rifles, and beg to give my views 
on this subject. 

I use the Lyman hunting sight for the 
rear. It is adjustable to any range and my 



rifle, a 40-65 Winchester, will carry from 
point blank up to almost 1,000 yards with 
proper adjustment of this sight. Any one 
not used to these sights would be surprised 
at the accuracy that can be secured, at dis- 
tances far beyond those to which a bullet 
can be sent with any chance of hitting, with 
the common open sights. For a front 
sight I use one of copper, made to order, 
with the least possible bead. 

I have hunted with these sights 3 sea- 
sons and have found I can shoot at least 
50 per cent, better than when I used open 
sights. In rapid shooting (and there is 
often where the game is bagged), there is 
no over shooting. Looking through the 
peep the game is in plain view and all there 
is to do is to put the bead just where you 
want the bullet to go, and pull. With the 
open sights the mistake is often made of 
holding the gun on the game; but with 
too much of the front sight showing. This 
cannot be done with the peep sights. 

Another advantage of the Lyman sight 
is that good shooting can be done with it 
in the evening and the early morning twi- 
light. With the open sights everything 
would be a blur; but looking through the 
little peep the bead comes out finely and 
the game can easily be covered. 

These are but a few of the good points 
of the peep sight; but any one who uses 
it would never use any other. The best 
way to learn all of its virtues is to try it. 
Do not go at once to the hunting grounds 
to do this; but after having your sight 
properly adjusted test it at target until 
thoroughly familiar with it. At first you 
will think it impossible to hit anything, 
with the whole country spread out before 
you, through the little hole; but a few tri- 
als will convince you that you can do a 
great deal better shooting in this way than 
in any other. R. C. Fisk. 



AN EARLY HAMMERLESS. 

Roswell, N. M. 

Editor Recreation: I have an interest- 
ing old gun that was made by Wm. Green- 
er, father of the late W. W. Greener of 
London. It is a double barrel gun — a rifle 
barrel on top of a shot barrel. It is finely 
made and sighted. Was a flint lock and has 
been changed to a percussion lock. This 
was done by Peter Powell, of Cincinnati. 
The gun was sold to the father of Abraham 
Lincoln and afterward became the prop- 
erty of the late President. He" brought it 
from Kentucky to New Salem, 111., near 
Springfield. 

My father, J. A. Denton, traded a yoke 
of cattle and 10 cords of wood to Mr. Lin- 
coln, delivering the wood to the firm of 
Lincoln & Herndon, Attorneys. 

I have used the gun ever since 1852, and 
the ducks, geese, rabbits, etc., I have killed 



148 



RECREA TION. 



with it I do hope will not all gather around 
my death bed; but I trust they will let the 
old, gray haired hunter die in peace. 

About 20 years ago a young lady visited 
our family, from Boston, and when as- 
signed the best room in the house she ob- 
jected to it on account of " a horrid old 
gun," being in it; so father told, me to 
take the gun to the shop and have the 
hammers both taken off, so it surely could 
not shoot. But the sweet girl said, 

" Oh yes, old rusty guns are the very 
worst to shoot when they are not supposed 
to be loaded." 

So I gritted my teeth, with as sweet 
a smile as possible, took the gun and bowed 
myself out of her presence, while father 
kindly put both arms around her to hold 
her while I moved the " horrid thing " to 
the shop. 

I was in such a jolly humor, at thinking 
how father got a good hug, that I re- 
moved the hammers and have never seen 
them since. I never told mother, either. 
But how I did really love that sweet girl! 

And that is how the gun became a " ham- 
merless." It is so old the name and dates 
are all rusted off, but " New York," and a 
faint " m " and " London." It had a load- 
ing stick on the right side for the rifle, and 
one on the left for the shot barrel; so that 
from a muzzle view it looked like a 4 barrel 
gun. G. Denton, Roswell, N. M. 



was expected, but was still much less than 
the penetration which would have been ob- 
tained from the bullets if they had entered 
wood when they started upward." 



A FALLING BULLET. 

Mr. P. McCarthy, Yonkers, N. Y., asks 
whether a rifle ball, fired straight up, would 
have the same velocity as if fired horizon- 
tally; also whether, on its downward 
flight, it would acquire a velocity and 
penetration, at the earth's surface, equal to 
that given by the powder charge when fired 
horizontally or vertically. 

I referred this question to Gen. G. W. 
Wingate, who' replies as follows: 

" In going up the bullet is kept point 
first, and straight, by the twist. Conse- 
quently it attains a great velocity. Coming 
down it would turn so that the heavy end 
would be downward, and it would ' wobble.' 
Not only is its velocity reduced, from these 
causes, but in addition, the rule of falling 
bodies is that after they have obtained a 
certain speed they go no faster, on account 
of the resistance of the air. This velocity 
is not very great, and is far from being 
equal to the velocity which the ball has 
when it starts out of the rifle to go upward. 
Where the bullet is thrown so as to de- 
scribe a curve and come point down, as in 
the new rifled mortars, it strikes much 
harder. 

" In firing the Springfield cartridges 
from a gattling gun, on such a curve that 
the bullets would fall quite close to the 
gun, they penetrated, I believe, from iy 2 
to 2 inches of plank. This was better than 



AN ALL ROUND GUN. 

Bellevue, Ky. 

Editor Recreation: I have, for 3 years 
past, used a gun that was about a pound 
too heavy, and with a stock of Yi inch too 
much drop. Hope none of my brother 
readers have been similarly handicapped. . 

I think E. W. S. in April number, has 
about the right idea in regard to an all- 
round gun, i.e., 12 gauge, 30 inch barrels, 
right modified choke, left full choke, etc. 
Personally I prefer both barrels full 
choked, on account of superior range and 
killing power; as well as on account of an 
excitable temperament. I have better suc- 
cess, at wing shooting, when making 
rather long shots. 

If you load your own ammunition, such 
scatter shells as may be needed can be 
loaded, by dividing the shot charge in 2 or 3 
equal parts, with cardboard wads between, 
and using only 1 ounce of shot. With pink 
or black edge wad on top of shot this 
makes a load that is good for brush shoot- 
ing. 

The consensus of opinion, as expressed 
in letters to Recreation, seems to be that, 
other things being equal, the bigger bore 
will do the greater execution; though I 
see in the last issue an advocate of the 16 
gauge. The arm in question weighs 7^ 
pounds, has 28-inch barrels, right modified, 
left full choke, and the writer says he uses 
1 ounce of shot for all shooting. I also 
am an advocate of 1 ounce of shot for 
quail and general shooting, when No. 7 or 
smaller shot is used, and when extreme 
range is unnecessary. 

I hope to have a new gun, some day, and 
wishing to be satisfied with same, and being 
unable to see how the above 16 gauge 
would be superior to a light 12 gauge, 
would like the following queries answered: 

Would not a 12 gauge, 28 inch, 7 pounds 
or less, full choke, shoot 1 ounce of shot 
as well or better? Is not the ammunition 
as cheap and more easily procured? Can 
more than one ounce of shot be used in a 
16 gauge, with good results? Does it shoot 
the larger sizes of shot as well as a 12 
gauge? If the 16 does not shoot the 12 
gauge charge of shot (iVg ounce), how can 
it have the killing circle, or range? 

C. D. K. 



ANOTHER REPEATER MAN. 

Britt, la. 
Editor Recreation: As everyone seems 
to have a right to express his opinion, re- 
garding the best make of gun, I will give 
you mine. I am particularly fond of a re- 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



149 



peating shot gun, 12 gauge, medium choke. 
I have used one nearly 6 years and if you 
want a game gun, and can shoot one of 
these, it is the gun for you. I have hunted 
with good shots, with 10 gauges, and never 
saw them kill as many birds as I could with 
my 12 gauge. Some of them have traded 
fine 10 gauge double guns for repeaters and 
think they are the best on earth. The only 
objection to the repeater is that it uses a 
2Yz shell. 

I have" killed 5 cranes out of one flock, 
passing over me, and 4 geese. I have made 
scores on other game that can't be beaten 
by any 10 or 8 gauge gun. 

L. S. Van Vliet's idea, in not getting a 
full choke gun is right. At- short range a 
full choke gun, if held on the bird, cuts it 
up till it is almost worthless. Furthermore, 
on windy days, or in timber and cornfield 
shooting, the best shots cannot do good 
execution with a full choke, and I don't 
think weight has anything to do with the 
question of hard shooting. With the 10 
gauge more shot can be used; but you will 
have to load considerably heavier to get 
the penetration of the 12 gauge load, and 
most of the good makes of 12 gauge guns 
will shoot right. 

We are too quick to find fault with the 
gun. Most of the trouble is with us. We 
all have off days. I have seen smooth bore 
rifles, not much larger than 44 calibre, 
shoot shot as hard as any of our shot guns. 
I prefer a 12 gauge 30 in. gun, 7 pounds. 

What is the best rifle for big game? 

R. S. Brickey. 



Can you or any of your readers, tell me 
where I can get a book on old guns and 
pistols? 

I have a collection of over 100 old arms, 
including U.- S. Army flint lock, made in 
Harper's Ferry, 1809; Queen Anne flint 
lock, 6 ft. long, used in the Revolution, and 
a lot of old cap and ball pistols, with no 
maker's name or date. Have some dupli- 
cates, which I would be glad to trade. 

Recreation seems to treat of every- 
thing, from a " chipmunk " to a moose, and 
from a minnow to a whale. I could not 
do without Recreation, and have it sent 
to my camp, in the wilds of Maine, when 
there; so I expect a flood of light from 
you, or from your readers, a'bout old fire- 
arms. C. R. Richards, Rochester, N. Y. 

" The Gun and its Development," by W. 
W. Greener, published by Charles Scrib- 
ner's Sons, N. Y., has a great fund of in- 
formation about old guns. Captain Philip 
Reade, of the U. S. Army, has contributed 
to Recreation a series of illustrated ar- 
ticles on old guns, which have been printed 
within the past year. 

Will my readers please send me such in- 
formation, and photographs, as they may 
have, on this subject? — Editor. 



I would like to tell the readers of your 
king of magazines about some of the work 
of the 25-35 Winchester. It is all a mistake 
to think it good only for small game. I 
have killed bear, elk and deer with mine, 
and have never handled a gun that could 
do better work. I killed a deer last fall 
that would not have known he had been 
hit if I had used a black powder gun. He 
was standing quartering to me, about 150 
yards away. I intended to hit him in the 
point of the shoulder; but under shot, and 
only " ticked " his breast, cutting a gash 
in the hide 1^ inches long. He ran 20 
steps and fell dead. Now what killed him? 
I examined his heart and it was a mass of 
clotted blood. If Repeater, of Conners- 
ville, Ind., thinks of killing small game, 
with one of these rifles, he will have to hit 
it in the head; for if he hits the body of a 
duck, or a grouse, he won't have any game 
to take home with him. A 32-40 or 38-55 
would be a better target rifle. 

I have had 25 years' experience in the 
Rockies, and the 25-35 is by far the best all- 
round rifle I have ever used. 

M. P. Dunham, Woodworth, Mont. 



On page 467, of your June number, P. J. 
M., Maxwell City, N. M., asks the opinion 
of those who have used them, as to the 
Lyman sights. 

For 8 or 10 years past I have used these 
attachments and am highly pleased with 
them. 

When first examined one is apt to think 
them impractical; but after using them to 
fire a few hundred shots no hunter would 
go back to the old " buck horn " and 
" knife-blade " affairs. 

On standing game one can " catch sight" 
from one to 2 seconds quicker than with 
an open sight; and that often makes just 
the difference between getting a shot and 
not getting it. 

On moving objects there is no compari- 
son, at all, to be made. Wm. Lyman has 
never put a bad thing on the market. 

Allow me to suggest that you exclude 
from Recreation all illustrations showing' 
any person leaning on the muzzle of a gun. 

Our sons and daughters are imitative 
creatures and Recreation should con- 
tribute nothing to aid the fool factories. 
Just wait a little and give your readers a 
portrait of the corpse. V. B. 



In my opinion the " best gun " is the 
Burgess repeater. Beside being one of 
the smoothest working guns in the market, 
it has no equal for- close, hard shooting. 
The rapidity and accuracy with which its 
6 charges can be delivered into the midst of 
a flock of ducks, bagging — in almost every 
instance — ducks that would have gotten 
away from a double barrel, warms the heart 
of a sportsman. I have seen an entire flock 



i5° 



RECREA TION. 



of 6 ducks bagged, with a Burgess — not one 
getting away.* 

It works as well on a sand bar, in a gale 
of wind, as in the woods. I have been 
using a Burgess, for nearly a year, at the 
trap and in the field. Its shooting qualities, 
for all sizes of shot; its simplicity, rapidity 
and durability, beat any gun I ever saw or 
owned and I strongly advise any one look- 
ing for the " best gun " to get a Burgess. 

Rau McDonald. 




I enclose a copy of a target I made, in 
testing a 25-20 Marlin. You will notice 
the vertical line of shots can all be nearly 
covered with a lead-pencil, and having 
used only open sights I consider it an ex- 
cellent target. I believe the Marlin or Bal- 
lard barrels cannot be excelled. 

L. A. Stave, Champaign, 111. 



Editor Recreation: I have read Rec- 
reation for a long time and have never 
found a magazine that comes up with it, 
though I take a good many. I notice that 
nearly all the houses I deal with, and deem 
responsible, advertise in your magazine. 
If some of the dealers who do not advertise 
in Recreation, would try an " ad " in it 
they would no doubt be surprised at the 
returns. I noticed that last year a house 
that was opposed to Recreation went un- 
der. A hint to the wise is sufficient. 

Will some kind reader give me his ex- 
perience with a 16 gauge gun? Tell me 
what you think of it. What load is best 
for it and what powder? 

What calibre rifle would you recommend, 
for deer and bear? 

What do you think of the model '90 Win- 
chester, 22 short? 

C. R. W., Oak Park, 111. 

* Why kill an entire flock ? Why not let a few remain for 
seed? Was the shooter trying to exterminate game? Or 
was he in pursuit of legitimate, manly sport? — Editor. 



Replying to A. H. W., who wishes infor- 
mation concerning the Winchester repeat- 
ing shot gun: The first 2 guns assembled 
by the company were shown to the public 
by J. R. Stice and me. Shortly after this I 
won one, in a free for all shoot, used it 2 
seasons, at the traps, and found it a close, 
hard shooter. 

Although I never used one of these guns 
in the field I should feel handicapped if I 
were obliged to carry a double gun where 
game was plenty, while a companion had 
a Winchester. I have often broken 3 clay 
birds, thrown from 3 traps at the same time, 
and I know that, on an average, these guns 
will give as good pattern and penetration 
as any $100 gun in the market. 

T. R. W., New Haven, Conn. 



Someone has asked about the 16 gauge 
shot gun, and I should like to give my ex- 
perience. Twelve years ago I bought a 10 
gauge gun and used it 3 years; sold it and 
got another, which I used 3 years. 

Then I got a 12 gauge and then another 
and used them 6 years. Last fall I got a 16 
gauge, weighing 6 pounds 15 ounces, and 
would not trade it for all 4 of the other 
guns. It shoots as well as any, and is so 
much lighter to carry. Besides 20 or 30 
shells for this gun do not load down a 
hunting coat as the others did. The 16 
can be swung on to game quicker; and 
that little extra speed means a great deal, 
sometimes, when the game is just start- 
ing, especially in thick cover. 

Get a good American 16 gauge gun; and 

load with 2.y 2 drams American smokeless 

powder and % or 1 oz. shot; and you can 

get the game if you could with anything. 

E. S. Billings, Smyrna, N. Y. 



W. G. E. wants to know the advantages 
and disadvantages of the new 30-30 and 30- 
40 Winchester rifles. If killing power is 
what he wants the 30-40 has the best of it; 
but if he wants camp meat the 30-30 is best. 
My partner, and one of the neighbors, use 
30-30's. They first used the soft nosed bul- 
let, but soon quit them, as they spoiled too 
much meat; and are now using the full 
cased bullet. There is no gun made that 
can beat the 30-40 Winchester, with soft 
nosed bullet, for killing qualities. 

M. P. Dunham, Woodworth, Mont. 



In reply to an inquiry in Recreation, 
regarding Lyman sights, I will say they are, 
without doubt, the best all-round sights on 
the market. I have them on all my rifles 
and think they improve my shooting at 
least one half. The receiver sight is par- 
ticularly good, for it can be raised or low- 
ered quicker than the others. 

Recreation is another good thing. It 
is a perfect magazine for sportsmen: in 
fact, the best published. P. B., M.D. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



WHY DO WOLVES "DOPE?" 

Editor Recreation: Mr. Ernest Seton 
Thompson asks, in June Recreation, if 
any of its readers have ever seen wolves 
rolling in carrion. Yes, I have. A few 
years ago I was hunting elk, early in Sep- 
tember, on the head waters of White river, 
Colorado. Late one evening I fired at a 
bull elk, standing in an open park near the 
timber. After the crack of my rifle, a few 
strides took him under cover of the spruce. 
It was too dark to trail, but returning early 
next morning, I found my game had run 
through this strip of timber, some 200 
yards in width, and after going 40 to 50 
yards in an open park had given it up. My 
ball had passed through behind the shoul- 
ders, to the skin on the other side. 

The meat was soured; so I took off the 
head skin, with the antlers, for mounting. 

Some 2 days later, I was packing in an- 
other elk I had killed, and came past the 
first carcass. I discovered that 2 or more 
bear had been to the carcass, had disem- 
boweled it, -and had made a great feast. The 
carcass was lying in an exposed place, and 
although at a high altitude it created con- 
siderable stench. I decided to return on 
the 2d evening, thinking I might encounter 
" Old Ephraim." I did so but was not fa- 
vored with a visit from Bruin. I went back 
the next morning, and while approaching 
the carcass, discovered the wind was wrong 
for me; so I circled, which threw me some 
300 yards off and above the carcass, at the 
edge of another strip of spruce. On creep- 
ing to the edge and looking over, I saw a 
large timber wolf at the carcass. I had seen 
several of these animals in Wisconsin, 
Michigan and Minnesota, but this was the 
first one I had ever seen in the mountains. 
I watched him carefully, through my glass- 
es, and crawled a little nearer, under cover 
of a clump of willows. I found he was not 
eating, but " lolling " about the carcass. I 
saw him roll on it repeatedly. He would 
sit up, lick himself, jump over the carcass, 
and at it again. How long before my ar- 
rival the " circus " had opened, I cannot 
say. 

I levelled my gun for a 250 yards' shot, 
and cut loose. I saw a grayish streak with 
a funnel end to it, reaching from the carcass 
to the timber, but haven't seen the wolf 
since. I approached the carcass and found 
the wolf had not eaten a morsel of it, but 
had contented himself by rolling in it. 

I have frequently seen dogs roll in and 
about the carrion of a cow or horse, with- 
out eating of it. Why they do it I cannot 
say, unless they have the instinctive desire 
of all carnivorous animals to linger about 
flesh, either fresh or carrion; and if it has 
passed the eatable stage they roll in it to 
carry that " in-stink-tiveness " with them. 
Dall De Weese, Canon City, Colo. 



WOLVES, DOGS, AND CARRION. 

Noting the communication of Mr. 
Thompson, in June Recreation, concern- 
ing the habit of wolves rolling in carrion, 
I desire to say this is not limited to wolves; 
but you will find all hunting dogs — espe- 
cially the Gordon setter, do it. 

I have noticed this for years and could 
not give any solution save that the odor 
was pleasant to the dogs. I have known 
my dog to put his nose into the air and 
dart off, at a fast gait, notwithstanding my 
orders to return. Later he would come 
back with the smell of carrion about him. 

I have found great pleasure in Mr. 
Thompson's articles and pictures, in Rec- 
reation, regarding wolves and their habits. 
During my service in the regular army, in 
Arizona and New Mexico, we were greatly 
troubled with wolves and in one instance 
a herder was torn to death; but that was an 
isolated case and when a heavy snow had 
been on the ground a long time. 

James S. Kennedy. 



With regard to the query of Mr. E. S. 
Thompson, in June Recreation, touching 
the propensity of wolves for rolling in car- 
rion, may I in measure reply to his theory 
by asking, why it is that dogs do the same 
thing? I have noticed it often, not only 
among common curs, but among high bred 
sheep dogs. 

This habit of the dog being identical with 
that of his wolfish cousin, I think his reason 
for indulging it is the same. Mr. Thomp- 
son's theory that the wolf wishes to dis- 
guise his personal scent is good, but how 
about the dog? Does it not seem more 
likely that both wolf and dog, finding the 
taste of decayed flesh agreeable, find the 
smell of it equally so? 

H. H. Sauber, Willows, Cal. 



Mr. Thompson's guess, as to why wolves 
roll in carrion, may be a good one. I con- 
sider it " one of those things that no fellow 
can find out." I suppose he knows a great 
many dogs have the habit (or rather the in- 
stinct) and the worst dog in the whole heap 
is the pointer. He takes more delight in 
a rotten hog, an old skunk skin, a dead 
snake, or something of that kind, than any 
other living dog.. I have studied your ques- 
tion for years, and have whaled my pointers 
repeatedly, for doping; but why they want 
to be such fools, I have never been able to 
find out. They are willing to take a thrash- 
ing to get a wallow on a bad smelling 
article of that kind, and will sneak around 
to do it. They seem to want to rub their 
shoulders good, in the dope; and are not 
satisfied until both are well fixed. I would 
like to know " why is it? " 

L. W. Byram, Kansas City, Mo. 



151 




THE LITTLE STRIPED SKUNK. 

One day when Dame Nature was in a 
merry mood, she made the striped skunks, 
of which Spilogale putorius, from Florida, 
and shown herewith, is the type. At this 
late day it cannot be determined whether 
her original intention was to turn out a 
white animal with black markings, or the 
reverse. At all events, the result is a four- 
legged harlequin. One glance at him is 
enough to fix him in the memory for all 
time, even though the acquaintance stops 
at sight. 

I am fond of animals generally, but at 
the skunk I draw the line. I have known 
him from my small-boyhood, and I'm 
" agin him." His reputation always was 
bad, but his acquaintance is worse. He 
has the colors of a bloody pirate, the im- 
pudence of a Piegan Indian, and a breath 
like a turkey buzzard. He gets into your 
mink traps when you don't want him; he 
kills your chickens in the "close season," 
and when your dogs attempt to remonstrate 
with him, he sends them into quarantine 
for 14 days. When you are tenting on the 
plains he is eternally wanting to get in 
bed with you, even though there are mill- 
ions of other camping places available. 
If you object, he bites you, and either 
gives you hydrophobia, or a tremendous 
scare. 

In some portions of the South the little 
striped skunk is commonly called the 
" Hydrophoby Cat," in the belief that its 



bite always produces that distressing fatal- 
ity. While it is undoubtedly true that a 
number of persons have died from skunk 
rabies, it is also true that even the skunks 
of the South and Southwest are not half so 
often afflicted with hydrophobia as people 
generally suppose. Many persons have 
been bitten by skunks not so afflicted, and 
of course without fatal results. The trouble 
is, however, there is but one way to recog- 
nize a rabid skunk, and even that is not al- 
ways satisfactory. Let the skunk bite an 
Indian. If the Indian dies, the skunk has 
rabies, and should be killed. If he does not, 
the skunk is sound and healthy; and the 
Indian should be killed. 

At present there are 15 species of skunks 
in the United States — all bad. Ten of these 
belong to the genus of striped skunks 
(Spilogale), and several quite closely re- 
semble the species figured herewith. Nine 
of the 10 species inhabit the arid regions of 
the Southwest. 

Mr. Ernest Seton Thompson calls atten- 
tion, for the first time I believe, to the fact 
that the little striped skunk is a good ex- 
ample of protective coloration, inasmuch 
as " its peculiar black and white markings 
are calculated to identify the animal with its 
surroundings Tin the South] when the light 
sand is barred with the heavy shadows cast 
by the palmetto fingers, under the rays of 
the vertical sun." 

Possibly Mr. Thompson has correctly di- 
vined Natures's intention in coloring this 
creature so fantastically, but I must say that 



152 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



153 



of all the animals with which I am ac- 
quainted our jet-black-snow-white skunks 
are certainly the most conspicuous. Either 
in the woods, with their ever shifting shad- 
ows, on the brushy uplands, or on the 
prairies, no small mammal at rest ever 
catches my eyes so quickly as does a skunk. 
But the doom of the skunk is sealed. His 
fur is now in fashion (under various names 
not its own). It is good, durable, reason- 
able in price, and when the black dye has 
" knocked the spots " out of it, even a 
skunk catcher would have hard work to 
recognize it without an introduction. 

W. T. Hornaday. 



THE WEST INDIAN SEAL. 

For 50 years zoologists have believed 
the West Indian seal (Monaclus tropicalis) 
totally extinct, and that not even one 
stuffed skin survived, as a record of its 
form and pelage. In 1844, however, a skin 
came to the National Museum, from Cuba. 
Then, in 1887, Mr. Henry L. Ward and 
Professor Ferrari Perez, of the Mexican 
National Museum, re-discovered the spe- 
cies, alive but fast asleep, on some tiny 
islets called the Triangles, in the Gulf of 
Campechy, about 50 miles from the coast 
of Yucatan. These naturalists collected 
about a dozen good specimens, which have 
been distributed among our largest mu- 
seums. 

Three weeks ago Mr. Cobb, of Pensa- 
cola, Fla., walked into the office of the New 
York Zoological Society, and offered to 
deliver any reasonable number of live seals, 
of this species, for a modest consideration 
in cash. It appears that on April 20, the 
fishing smack " Maude Spurling," of Pen- 
sacola, Captain Thos. Miner, visited the 
Triangles, and found there about 35 seals. 
Of these Captain Miner picked up 2 and 
carried them aboard his vessel, but killed 
none! 

The seals lay asleep on the beach, so 
tame and sluggish that the .whole colony 
might easily have been killed with clubs. 
This is just as they were described by Mr. 
Ward. The largest of the seals were about 
7 feet in length. 

The pair abducted by Captain Miner 
reached Pensacola alive and in good con- 
dition, and created a great sensation. They 
have been bought by men who will exhibit 
them at the Nashville Exposition. Four 
specimens have been ordered, of Captain 
Miner, for the Washington Zoological 
Park. Dr. Bean immediately ordered 3 for 
the New York Aquarium, and Captain 
Miner has gone to procure them. 

The West Indian seal is not a handsome 
animal, nor is it endowed with an over- 
supply of intelligence. As for activity, it 
cannot spell the word. Its color is a uni^ 



form, dull gray, except where its back is 
green with moss and algae. Its head is 
coarse and homely, and its voice — well, it 
lacks culture. Inferentially it may be said 
there must be some tired fis'h around the 
Triangles, or Monaclus tropicalis would 
surely starve to death. But what will our 
3 think of life in New York, after they shall 
have found out what it is like? 



FEEDING SUGAR TO A WILD BEAR. 

The brave and fearless frontiersman is 
not alone in opportunities to come in con- 
tact with the wild beasts of the forest. 
There is an estimable lady in this city who 
fed sugar, from her own fair hand, to as 
fine a specimen of female bear as was ever 
seen among the mountains of the West. 
Bruin weighed 600 pounds and had a fur as* 
sleek and glossy as velvet. It had not been 
5 minutes since she had left her cubs in the 
vast pine groves, on one of the mountain 
sides, within -the borders of the Yellow- 
stone National Park. 

It came about in this way: This female 
black bear makes a practice of entering the 
hotel office, at Old Faithful geyser, in the 
upper basin, Yellowstone National Park, 
every evening between 8.45 to 9.15 o'clock. 

Of course every one takes the story with 
a large grain of salt, on hearing it; especi- 
ally that bruin should be so prompt in mak- 
ing her calls. After spending 2 days at the 
geysers, paint pots, etc., in the Fire Hole 
basin, we proceeded to the Upper basin, 
where are situated the Giant, Giantess, Old 
Faithful and many other wonders. 

The first thing on our programme, for 
our first evening at this point, was to prove 
the truth or falsity of the bear yarn, and 
promptly at 8.30 p.m. we all entered the 
hotel office. We took our seats and formed 
a circle. The manager of the hotel left the 
door open, and we noticed he filled his 
pockets with loaf sugar and cake. Promptly 
at 9 p.m. the beautiful specimen of the bear 
family entered and walked to the centre of 
the circle of visitors. She sat down on her 
haunches and was fed by the hotel keeper 
and by the lady referred to. Bruin lives in 
the wild forest; has never been caged or 
chained, and we were told she had 2 cubs; 
also that she drove all other bears from the 
locality, and had been coming into the of- 
fice to get her sweets every evening for 2 
seasons. She has never heard the report 
of a gun, and it would not be well for any 
one to attempt to harm her. The hotel 
keeper does not make a practice of allowing 
others to offer Bruin sugar, cake, etc., but 
Mrs. E pleaded so hard, for the privi- 
lege of feeding a real live bear, that he gave 
her a handful of loaf sugar and the lady 
fed the bear. 

L. M. Earl, Salt Lake City, Utah. 



154 



RECREATION. 



A LAMB-KILLING RABBIT. 

A pet white rabbit is about the last creat- 
ure one would suspect of being likely to 
develop a taste for bloodshed and murder. 
Ordinarily a white rabbit is about as dan- 
gerous as a dove. The truthfulness of the 
following item, copied from the Shelby 
(Ohio) " News," is vouched for by one of 
Recreation's correspondents at Shelby- 
ville, Dr. R. D. Pratt. 

Another strange freak is reported by Mr. J. L. Zaring, 
who lives on the Smithfield pike, and its truthfulness is at- 
tested by him as well as by all his neighbors. 

For some time he had noticed the devastation wrought 
among his young lambs and had attributed it to foxes. He 
instituted a watch and was dumfounded when he dis- 
covered the lambs were being killed by a pet white rabbit, 
belonging to his little son. It would attack the lambs by 
throwing them down, biting them in the side and tearing 
them to pieces. It killed 10 of the lambs before being dis- 
covered. 

Dr. Pratt writes: 

" Mr. Zaring is a truthful man and I have 
not only his assurance that the story 
•is true, but his wife also vouches for it. He 
got the rabbit from his brother-in-law, and 
it was given to him because of its destruc- 
tiveness of its own kind, it having killed a 
good many other pet rabbits. This par- 
ticular rabbit Mr. Zaring gave to a friend, 
after he discovered it was killing his lambs, 
and it was accidentally killed. 

" I regret I could not get possession of 
it and keep it under observation." 



A SINGING COWBIRD. 

That really valuable bird, the cowbird, 
is not popular but he certainly has intelli- 
gence. He and his flock follow the cattle 
and are not over choice as to food. He is a 
polygamist, and the ladies of his family 
have simply no character at all, living aban- 
doned lives and laying their eggs in the 
nests of other birds. Yet the cowbird de- 
stroys many undesirable insects, and a re- 
cent incident shows that he has unsus- 
pected vocal powers. 

M. A. G. Towle, of Chicago, has been 
interested in a ranch near Niobrara, Neb., 
and has spent some time there. He noted 
the great number of cowbirds following the 
herds and one day saw a single specimen 
fluttering about on the ground, with a 
broken wing. He took the bird to the 
house where its wing soon healed, though 
the bird remained unable to fly. It was 
placed in a large cage, hanging near that 
of a canary. A few weeks later the family 
was one day astonished by hearing the cow- 
bird attempt to sing, evidently in imitation 
of the canary's notes. This effort continued 
until a fair degree of proficiency was at- 
tained. Is not this an isolated case? 

Stanley Waterloo, Chicago. 

The measurements first given, of my big 
buffalo head, are incorrect, owing to a lack 
of knowledge on the part of the gentleman 
who made them. He did not understand 



just how to go about this work. For my 
own satisfaction, for the benefit of your 
readers who wish to know just how large 
the head is, and in order to set myself right 
with my fellow sportsmen who want things 
correct, I have had an expert measure the 
big buffalo head and the following figures 
are correct. 

Circumference at base, right horn, 14^4 
inches. 

Circumference at base, left horn, 15 
inches. 

Length of right horn 19 inches. Length 
of left horn 21 inches. 

Spread of horns, at tips, 30^ inches. 
Spread of horns at widest point 41^ inches. 

Nose to top of skull 28^ inches. Nose 
to base of horn 22 inches. 

These measurements were made by Mr. 
Benjamin Batchelor, taxidermist, of this 
place. 

As above stated they are absolutely cor- 
rect and he, as well as other reliable men 
here will certify them at any time if de- 
sired. J. Gunther, Middletown, N. Y. 



In your May number, G.S.G., Meadow 
Creek, Montana, gives measurements of a 
deer head, the spread of which is stated as 
32> l / 2 inches, with 15 points. He inquires 
who has a larger head? R. & W. Gilfort, 
Orange, N. J., have several heads which 
compare favorably with the Meadow creek 
deer, and which possibly surpass it. They 
have the skull and horns of a mule deer, 
killed in Idaho, the horns of which meas- 
ure scant 2>ZVa inches and have 40 points. 
This specimen is a perfect one and has not 
horns of abnormal growth. 

Another, larger in spread than G.S.G.'s, 
if not in points, is a mule deer killed in Sis- 
kiyou County, California, which measures 
34^2 inches scant spread, and has 10 points. 

Two other specimens measure 32^ inches 
and 32y 2 inches and have, respectively, 18 
points and 21 points. 

Messrs. R. & W. Gilfort have 900 speci- 
mens of horns alone, and their collection 
represents specimen horns of nearly every 
animal on the globe. Messrs. Gilfort are 
readers of Recreation and are anxious to 
have G. S. G. bring his measuring rod to 
Orange. 

E. H. E., Newark, N. J. 



A friend and I were strolling through the 
woods, one morning last spring, when we 
met a hunter and his dog. We joined them 
and were making our way through some 
bushes, bordering a small stream, when a 
fox darted out from them. The dog was a 
fox hound, and he immediately went in hot 
pursuit. The hunter did not have a chance 
to get a shot at the fox, and when we 
emerged from the brush the fox was not to 
be seen; but the dog was scratching and 
nosing around what seemed to be a rabbit 
burrow. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



i55 



Noticing that the dog was biting at some- 
thing in the hole, the hunter pushed him 
away, reached into the hole and pulled out 
the fox, which was stone dead! Not a shot 
had been fired at him and we concluded he 
had been smothered to death. 

He had evidently been close pressed by 

the dog, and had tried to get into this hole, 

which proved too small for him. He was a 

red fox and his fur was in good condition. 

A. K., Sheboygan, Wis. 

Within the last month, the daily papers 
have reported the death of a Nebraska boy 
in a badger hole, also from smothering, 
like the fox described above. Ed. 



I would like to trap sparrows and cat 
birds. Also would like to know how to 
pickle different fresh water fish. 

R. E. Borhek, 
1st Ave., W. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Answer. — You should not trap wild birds, 
at all; for the chances are as 10 to 1 they 
would languish in captivity and soon die. 
About the only way to make cage pets, of 
wild creatures, is to take the young, and 
rear them in comfortable confinement. 
With birds this is exceedingly difficult, and 
boys should never attempt it unless they 
have big cages, and know all about bird 
food. 

To preserve fish in alcohol, buy " proof 
spirits " and dilute with 1-3 water. Open 
each fish, by making a slit along the belly. 
Remove the entrails, unless they are spe- 
cially wanted. Wash the fish clean; then 
immerse in the spirits. Do not crowd the 
specimens. A large fish requires plenty of 
spirits, renewed after 10 days. Seal the jars 
air tight, to prevent evaporation. 

Editor. 



You ask if the buffalo head, on the front 
cover of May Recreation, is a record 
breaker? From the looks of it should say 
no. The skin seems too tightly stretched. 
If he looked that way alive I should say he 
had been mixing up with poison ivy and 
was badly swelled. I should also say the 
set of horns was low; or rather that they 
lopped down sidewise. I am inclined to 
think an artificial skull was inside and that 
the horns are not curved in enough. So 
far as the circumference of base of horn is 
concerned, if they are loose, and mounted 
on pith, they might be boiled or steamed 
and expanded to a considerable degree by 
manipulation. However, I am not in the 
horn business and have none to sell, 
mounted or otherwise. 

Onyitta, Manchester, N. H. 



" Why is it? " asked the Elephant of the 
Lion, " that when any mischief is done in 
the jungle, the Leopard is always suspected 
first? " 

" Well," replied the Lion, " he is spotted 
J>y nature." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



Are 6 toes common to cats? We have 
4 kittens, 3 of which have 6 toes on each 
fore foot, and 5 on each hind foot. The 
other kitten has 7 toes on each fore foot 
and 6 on each hind foot. 

J. H., North Abingdon, Mass. 

Answer. — Six-toed or " double-pawed " 
cats are quite uncommon, although occa- 
sionally known, from time immemorial. 
This peculiarity is often transmitted to off- 
spring, but it does not occur with any cer- 
tainty. However, it is quite likely that by 
careful selection, a six-toed race could be 
produced. The " double-pawed " cat is 
even a greater curiosity than the six-toed 
freak. 



In June Recreation Angus Gaines, in 
speaking of the brown thrush, says: " Her 
4 eggs are of a delicate light blue color, 
with perhaps a light shade of green, but 
free from all spots and markings." 

I agree with him as to the color; but 
think he has made a mistake when he says 
they are free from spots. I 'have examined 
a number of eggs, and have a set before 
me; and all are spotted with fine dots of 
reddish brown. 

Frank A. Tapley, Haverhill, Mass. 



I would like to know what is the best 
book on Taxidermy, that will teach me the 
rudiments, as I want to learn the business. 

F. E. Parsons, 
8 Union St., Danbury, Conn. 

" Taxidermy and Zoological Collecting " 
by W. T. Hornaday, is the best book in 
the world, on taxidermy. It is published 
by Charles Scribner's Sons, 153 5th Ave- 
nue, New York City. The price is $2.50. 

Editor. 



How can the male and the female jack 
snipe be told apart? 

L. McC, Little Rock, Ark. 

There is no way of certainly distinguish- 
ing the male from the female jack snipe 
(Gallinago delicata) excepting by careful dis- 
section. The females average a little small- 
er, but otherwise are exactly like the males 
in appearance. 



While dissecting a great blue heron, re- 
cently, I took a pickerel from its throat, 
16J/2 inches long. T. W. Fraine, 

Taxidermist, Rochester, N. Y. 



Please send me the names and addresses 
of all the sportsmen of your acquaintance, 
in order that I may send them sample 
copies of Recreation. 



Getting subscriptions for Recreation is 
easy. The magazine does its own talking. 
Turn to the premium list, on page xlviii., 
and see what you can get by sending in a 
club. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



SOME SENSIBLE ADVERTISERS. 

Among the advertisers who are carrying 
full pages in Recreation, regularly or al- 
ternately, are The Marlin Fire Arms Co., 
Gas Engine and Power Co., The Century 
Co. (Century dictionary), Erie R. R. Co., 
The Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co. 
(Vim tires), The J. B. Williams Co. (shav- 
ing soap), B. T. Babbitt, Northern. S. S. 
Co., Santa Fe Railway, John H. Woodbury, 
Overman Wheel Co., Eastman Kodak Co., 
Rochester Optical Co., Manhattan Optical 
Co., The Kenwood Mills, Fowler Cycle 
Mfg. Co., E. R. Durkee & Co., Puncturoid 
Mfg. Co., Acme Cycle Co., E. C. Stearns & 
Co., Wing & Son (pianos), Monarch Cycle 
Mfg. Co., Gundlach Optical Co., The Hor- 
ton Mfg. Co., Forehand Arms Co., Henry 
C. Squires & Son, Yawman & Erbe (auto- 
matic reels), Ames Mfg. Co. (bicycles), 
Hall & Ruckel (Sozodont), Hiram Ricker 
& Sons (Poland water), C. B. & Q. Rail- 
way, National Gramophone Co., Derby, 
Abercrombie & Co. (tents and sleeping 
bags), John F. Douthitt (interior decora- 
tions), B. & O. Railway. 

Many of these people started in Recrea- 
tion with quarter pages, or half pages, for 
short terms, and have since contracted for 
full pages, for long terms. Any advertiser 
who is in doubt as to whether Recreation 
is a good medium is invited to correspond 
with these houses. 



but boycott this one. Then why should I 
advertise their wares, in my reading col- 



Here are the names of some of the good 
stories that are booked for September 
Recreation: " Hunting Near Steamboat 
Springs," by S. N. McAdoo; "A Yale- 
Princeton Foot Ball Game," Courtland 
Nixon; "A Canoe Trip to Rainy River," 
Harry Silver; "The Bear, the Belle, and the 
Blackberries," Francis Webster; " Catch- 
ing A Tartar," Captain J. G. Leefe, U.S.A.; 
" The Opening of the Season," R. B. Buck- 
ham; "A Bicycle Race, With A Sequel," 
Miss C. H. Thayer: "An Autumn Horse- 
back Ride," J. F. Gordon; "A Buck Ind- 
ian and a Buck Deer," J. B. Jennett. 

The departments will be as generously 
filled as usual. 



Several strong testimonials of guns and 
rifles, not advertised in Recreation, have 
lately been sent me, for publication, but all 
have been promptly returned to the writers. 
It is a rule as old as the printing press that 
the man who does not advertise gets no 
free puffs in the reading columns. Rec- 
reation approves of this rule and adheres 
♦ to it, in all cases. 

Some of the makers referred to adver- 
tise in all the other sportsmen's journals, 



umnsr 



Sportsmen who like Recreation will be 
slow to buy goods from people who fight 
it. 



Two ladies of Williamsport, Pa., Miss L. 
M. Schneider and Mrs. C. V. Taylor, have 
recently sent in clubs, of 75 subscribers, 
each, and have received, in return, high 
grade bicycles. Williamsport is credited, 
in the census reports, with a population of 
27,132. If 150 subscriptions can be ob- 
tained in Williamsport, in a week, why not 
in any other town of like size or larger? 
Why walk when you can get a bicycle for 
nothing? Several smaller clubs have been 
sent in from Williamsport within the past 
2 years. 



The Vim Tire people write me they con- 
sider Recreation the best advertising 
medium, of its class, published. They have 
tried it, with full pages for 3 months past, 
and should know. 



I am always glad of suggestions as to 
how to improve Recreation. Every read- 
er is invited to speak out in meeting, and 
say what he thinks is wrong about it. 



There are still some unfortunate sports- 
men who are not readers of Recreation. 
If you know any such send in their names, 
and greatly oblige them and 

The Editor. 



Will some of my California readers please 
send me some fine, sharp photos of a rabbit 
drive? I want them to illustrate a story 
of that peculiar institution. 



Don't fail to read " A Montana Dream," 
on page 158 of this issue. It is good, and 
you will like it. 



I have been in a good many game coun- 
tries, but this is the best I have ever seen. 
Goats and bear are more plentiful than 
needed, for good sport. Elk are fairly nu- 
merous; mule deer are plentiful on the 
mountains, and white tail deer are thick on 
all the bottom lands There are blue grouse 
on all the mountains and fool hens and 
ruffed grouse in the low lands. The fish- 
ing cannot be beaten. I have seen a good 
many elk this summer. 

M. P. Dunham, Woodworth, Mont. 



156 



BICYCLING. 



THE TRAMP CYCLIST. 
THOS. CUNNINGHAM. 

" I've got $100 to bet there isn't a cyclist 
around here that can beat my boy in a 
race." 

The speaker was Squire Holcomb, and 
he addressed a crowd of admirers, who had 
gathered around to congratulate him on 
his son's victory in the 2-mile race, which 
had just been run from Brown's crossing 
to the church. 

His son, Edward, owned a handsome 
Victor racer, geared to 80, and had ridden 
a wheel for years, while most of the other 
boys had only recently purchased bicycles. 
These were second-hand wheels, such as 
are often termed " ice wagons." Only one 
boy in the village, Harry Wesley, owned 
a wheel that could be compared to Ed- 
ward's. This was a Tribune, also geared 
to 80, but Harry had ridden it only 2 
months, so had not had time to " train 
down." 

It can be seen, therefore, that Edward's 
victory hardly warranted the Squire's en- 
thusiasm, but he continued to repeat the 
offer, until, finding no takers, he ex- 
claimed: 

" I'll give this $100 to anyone here who 
will race Edward and beat him." 

" I suppose that offer is open to me as 
well as to any one else." 

Surprised, everyone turned to look at 
the speaker. As the man stood in the mid- 
dle of the road, where he had arrived un- 
perceived by any of the group, he was a 
picture of that specimen of humanity so 
familiar of late years — the " hobo-dude." 

"Well, am I in this?" drawled the 
tramp, as he adjusted his straw hat and 
dusted his dilapidated patent leathers. 

"No, you're not in it!" stormed the 
Squire. " Do you suppose I'd have my 
boy race with a tramp? " 

" Oh, it doesn't make any great differ- 
ence with me, only I supposed you were 
a man of your word." 

At this, the Squire grew red and white 
by turns. The tramp had touched him in a 
weak spot; for the Squire prided himself 
on keeping his word. 

" But you have no wheel," exclaimed the 
Squire, hoping to escape in this way. 

" That's easily fixed," quoth the tramp, 
as he stepped to Harry, and possessed him- 
self of his wheel. The latter offered no 
objection. 

" Ah, a Tribune," cried the tramp. " The 
last wheel I rode was a Tribune. When 
you're ready, gentlemen, say the word." 

The Squire, seeing no way out of it, ap- 
pointed 3 of the boys to accompany the 



riders to Brown's crossing, as starters, 
while he and 2 others were to be referees. 
The tramp threw off his coat and hat, re- 
vealing, instead of a white shirt, only the 
bosom of one, to which was attached a 
paper collar. A pair of cuffs of the same 
material were fastened to his coat-sleeves. 
He then rolled his trousers up above the 
knees, displaying a pair of legs that made 
Edward look rather dubious. 

These few arrangements completed, he 
mounted his wheel, Edward following, and 
accompanied the 3 boys to the place of 
starting, where the 2 riders were placed in 
position and the signal given. 

At the start, Edward led by several yards, 
the tramp apparently finding it difficult to 
" limber up." Their positions remained 
the same for the first mile, when the tramp 
spurted and passed Edward, getting the 
lead by about 50 yards. Edward was un- 
able to close up the gap, and was still about 
this distance behind, when, on rounding 
a slight bend in the road, with the goal in 
plain view, half a mile distant, a startling 
thing occurred. 

A young girl rushed out of a lane, about 
100 yards ahead, crying loudly for help. 
As the tramp reached this point a few sec- 
onds later, he had to spurt to avoid a col- 
lision with a furious bull, which at that 
moment dashed into the road after the 
girl. 

With a glance the tramp took in the 
situation. Paying no attention to the bull 
behind him, he rode as close as possible to 
the child, stretched out his right arm and 
swept her up on the handle-bars in front 
of him. At the same time, a red sash (the 
cause of all the trouble) which she wore 
around her waist fluttered to the ground. 

" Put your arms around my neck," he 
cried, then bent to his task, and drove the 
wheel ahead with fierce energy. 

Had he looked behind, he would have 
seen that the race was virtually ended, for 
the bull had stopped and was tearing the 
sash to pieces; while Edward, having rec- 
ognized in the little girl his sister Alice, 
had become completely unnerved. Losing 
control of his wheel, he took a header and 
was now on all fours in the middle of the 
road, looking in a dazed way at the antics 
of the bull. Unaware of this, the tramp 
sped on and passed the crowd at the 
church, amid great cheers, for they had all 
been anxious spectators of the clever res- 
cue. 

When he had checked the wheel, and re- 
turned to the church, he was greeted with 
congratulations from all sides. The Squire 
extended his hand, exclaiming: " My 
friend, forgive me for my treatment of you. 
Your recent conduct compels me to admit 



J 57 



i58 



RECREA TION. 



the truth of the old saying: Clothes don't 
make the man.' " 

" Ah, that reminds me," drawled the 
tramp, and stepping to the spot where he 
had left his coat and hat, he put them on. 

" Come with me," cried the Squire, " you 
mustn't wear those things again." 

" On the contrary, I must," was the re- 
ply. " You see, I'm trying to introduce 
this style; and that's my object in traveling 
around — a sort of advance agent of the 
Prince of Wales you understand." 

At this moment Edward rode up looking 
very tired. 

" Down from that wheel, Edward, and 
turn it over to this man," cried the Squire. 
Then to the tramp: " Here, my friend, is 
the $100, and the wheel goes with it — you 
have shown yourself worthy to ride it." 

The tramp thanked the Squire in his 
drawling way; then, fishing in his pockets 
and producing a cigarette, he lit it, doffed 
his hat gracefully to the crowd, mounted 
and pedalled slowly down the road. 

That evening at the village store, when 
the usual crowd had gathered to talk over 
the events of the day, the Squire appeared 
with a $100 bill. " I've got $100," he said, 
" to bet there isn't a man around here that 
can beat that tramp. Any takers?" 



Touching the tandem, let's decide, 
If they shall fall in love who ride — 
Or if, as may be, this is all, 
That they who ride in love, shall fall. 
— Detroit Journal. 



USEFULNESS OF THE BICYCLE. 

Lack of suitable means of conveyance 
has practically excluded many people from 
the study of certain branches of science 
and art. For instance, the study of micros- 
copy. The student of the smaller things 
in nature soon exhausts his immediate 
field of investigation, but when the coun- 
try, for miles around, is presented him by 
use of the wheel, interest in the microscope 
and bicycle are jointly augmented. The 
discovery of new pools, each teeming with 
a world of microscopic life, new plants and 
insects, all add to the value of the wheel in 
the estimation of the microscopist, and 
whenever he goes out he is pretty sure to 
carry his paraphernalia for gathering speci- 
mens; so that he not only benefits by the 
outing, but also secures the means of pass- 
ing many profitable hours indoors. This 
applies also to the geologist, mineralogist, 
botanist, or any other student of nature. 

To the artist the bicycle is the missing 
link between himself and nature. It carries 
him outside of brick walls and burning 
pavements, into open fields, among trees 
and rocks and picturesque buildings where 
he may sketch or study subjects in their 
natural environment. 

The photographer finds in the wheel his 



natural ally. It carries him and his camera 
to the objective point, and widens his range 
beyond what could ever have been con- 
templated before the invention of the bi- 
cycle. 

Appliances are made for carrying, on the 
bicycle, the instruments and apparatus of 
these out-door students of nature, and it 
would seem a simple matter to provide 
others which would enable the wheelman 
to proceed on his journey of investigation 
without hindrance. 



The first American made bicycle was 
sold March 13, 1878. 



" Give her air! Give her air! " "What's 
the matter? Has the woman fainted?" 
" No; her bicycle tire has flattened." 

— Philadelphia North American. 



A MONTANA DREAM. 
JOHN V. COLE. 

I heard of a widow, one time; 

She was plump, she was pretty and neat. 
At that time I hadn't a dime, 

But I wanted this widow, so sweet. 

She had stock on the ranges, they said; 

She had mines of both silver and gold; 
It put me most out of my head, 

For where she was at, no one told. 

My cabin was lonesome and drear, 
My placer mine all was dug out; 

My grub it was gone — pretty near, 

And my gum boots leaked all round 
about. 

I was mending these old boots one night, 
I had seated myself on the floor, 

When a lady rode up, on her bike, 
And punctured her tire, at my door. 

She was hungry, and tired, and lost, 
So I cooked her a meal right away; 

That gum boot cement it was boss 
For mending bike tires so they'd stay. 

I saddled my broncho up then, 
And escorted the widow to town; 

I stayed there to chat until ten, 
And I felt like a man of renown. 

Now I've traded my bronk for a bike, 
With seats for my wife, self and boy; 

And I gladly remember that fortunate 
night, 
For it filled my life chuck full of joy. 



" Our cook is crazy about bicycling." 
" Does she ride much?" 
" Ride? She gets on her wheel to hang 
out the washing." — Detroit Free Press. 



BICYCLING. 



159 



WHEELING FOR PLEASURE. 

In February, '96, I undertook to find out 
how many miles a person, riding merely 
for pleasure, could cover in a season of 10 
months. 

At the close of the season I was sur- 
prised to learn that I had ridden 3,000 
miles; enough to have covered the dis- 
tance from New York to Yuma, Arizona. 

We' had a very dry, pleasant summer, 
that year, and the roads were in excellent 
condition for wheeling. My riding was 
done mostly on Sundays, and evenings, 
with my club friends. By starting in the 
morning and returning the same day we 
managed to visit most of the cities, towns, 
and villages, within a radius of 60 miles of 
New York. 

I rode, during September and October, 
874 miles, making only 2 centuries in that 
time, and these were with the club. The 
greatest distance I ever rode in one day 
was 128 miles. This was done in 12 hours. 

In all this riding I have never received 
a scratch. I have been in several collisions, 
but my wheel always got the worst of them. 
In one instance I had to ride 22 miles, with 
only one pedal, the other having been 
broken off at the crank. 

Geo. A. Einsetter, 
Century Wheelmen, New York. 



CHOICE OF NECKS. 

See the girl! 

The girl is falling on the neck of the 
man. 

Does the girl fall on the neck of the man 
because they are alone in the gloaming? 

Partly. 

Chiefly, however, the girl falls on the 
neck of the man because she is learning to 
ride the wheel, and the man is her in- 
structor, and she chooses to fall on any 
old neck rather than on her own. — Detroit 
Journal. 



GOOD ROADS. 

A writer in the L. A. W. Bulletin says: 

I saw a gang of prisoners, in Atlanta, Ga., 
building a first-class road. They were 
working out their salvation, giving the 
county good roads; conflicting in no way 
with free labor, and who can say they were 
not better off, morally, in God's free air 
than when penned up, in idleness, in a foul- 
smelling prison? 

On the island of Jamaica, where I made 
a bicycle tour last winter, and where they 
have the best roads this side of the Atlantic, 
we saw 2 large prison gangs at work pre- 
paring material for roads. There must 
have been over 300 in each gang, but we 
could not make a careful estimate of the 
number because we had to keep moving. 

There could be no more effective plan 



for getting rid of tramps, or of that class 
of men who steal and fight, and are sent 
up for 6 months, filling our jails at great 
cost to the people, than to make them 
work. They should be compelled to earn 
their living by working on the roads, where 
they would do free labor the least harm. 



RUBBING IT IN. 

He was all out of breath as he jumped 
from his wheel, hastened to a ticket office 
in the little suburban station, and anxiously 
inquired: 

" Can I catch the 4.30 express to Jersey 
City?" 

Never a hair turned the official, as he 
looked up from the paper he was reading 
and answered: 

" That depends on how fast you can ride, 
young fellow. She left here 5 minutes 
ago." — Exchange. 



William H. Baldwin, president of the 
Long Island Railroad, has joined the L. A. 
W. and is planning a great scheme for the 
benefit of wheelmen. His proposition is 
to convert Long Island into a wheelman's 
paradise. He proposes to do this by ap- 
pealing to and encouraging the different 
communities on the island to improve their 
highways, to. build cycle paths and to ar- 
range for the generous treatment of all 
touring and visiting riders. 

President Baldwin has employed a spe- 
cial agent, in connection with the passen 
ger department of his road, to- get up 
printed matter and maps, showing the va- 
rious routes for wheelmen with descrip- 
tions of roads, scenery and hotel accommo- 
dations, showing where best to start from 
in making short runs or long tours. This 
literature will be spread broadcast for the 
information of riders. He says " Long Isl- 
and will be made a cyclists' paradise before 
we get through with it." 



One of the most delightful bicycle rides, 
out of New York, is that over what is 
known as the Seabright circuit. To make 
this you leave from foot of West 14th 
street, by steamer Mary Patten or Elberon, 
at 8.30 or 9 a.m. and reach Seabright at 12 
m. Here you disembark and ride down 
Ocean avenue 6 miles, crossing the 
Shrewsbury river at Pleasure Bay, near the 
Hotel Avenel; go West to the famous 
Rumson road and North on this to Sea- 
bright, where you connect with the return 
boat, reaching New York again at 8 p.m. 

The sail is about 60 miles and the ride 22 
miles, over the finest series of roads in the 
country. Steamboat fare, for the round 
trip, is but 50 cents. 



BOOK NOTICES. 



Hon. John S. Wise's dog book is out, at 
last. It has been referred to in a previous 
issue of Recreation, but lest some unfor- 
tunate reader may have neglected to order 
a copy of it, I will state, again, that the title 
of it is " Diomed; " that it is the most 
charming dog story ever written; that it is 
a work of 330 pages, with nearly 100 beauti- 
ful illustrations, and that it sells for the very 
easy price of $2. 

John S. Wise, the author, has done as 
much to promote a love for dogs, in the 
minds of the people, as any other man liv- 
ing. He has also done a great deal to ele- 
vate field sports and to improve the blood 
of field dogs. He was for many years presi- 
dent of the Pointer Club of America. 
When he took that position, dog shows 
drew only sportsmen, and few of these. 
Now these shows are crowded by society 
people, many of whom care nothing for 
shooting, but all of whom like a good, well 
bred dog. Mr. Wise has been largely in- 
strumental in bringing about this change. 
His name, in connection with any dog 
show, or field trial or strain of dogs, has 
been, for many years, a guarantee that 
fairness and squareness could be expected 
from that source, and this, I am sorry to 
say, was not the case when he entered the 
field of dogdom. 

Diomed is the life story of one of Mr. 
Wise's famous hunting dogs, purporting 
to have been told by the dog himself. It is 
told so naturally, and in so graphic a way, 
that the reader forgets, entirely, that the 
beast is dumb and that some one else is 
speaking for him. 

At a recent dinner of the Camp Fire 
Club, Mr. Wise was invited to read a favor- 
ite chapter from his book, and did so. The 
50 ladies and gentlemen present were fas- 
cinated, and spellbound by the intensely 
dramatic interest of this small portion of 
the narrative, and at every pause they ap- 
plauded, heartily, and cried " Go on." 
They would have had Mr. Wise read the 
entire book, that evening, if they could. 

At the close of the reading, there was a 
perfect tumult of applause, and dozens of 
the guests crowded around Mr. Wise to 
commend and congratulate him. 

This book is bound to sell, by the thou- 
sands, and I trust no reader of Recrea- 
tion, who has not already a copy of it, will 
go to bed without ordering one. Send your 
order direct to John S. Wise, 44 Broad 
Street, New York. It will warm the heart 
of the veteran sportsman, and you will get, 
in return, a book that will warm your heart, 
through many a long evening. 

Do not forget to mention Recreation, 
when you write for the book. 



" How to Listen to Music " should be in 
every home and every library in America. 
It is one of the most satisfactory books of 
the year — as fascinating as a romance and 
as instructive as a text-book. Mr. H. E. 
Krehbiel, to whose keen perception of our 
deficiencies and our desires, we owe this 
delightful book, has been for many years 
musical critic for the " New York Trib- 
une," and is the author of " Studies in the 
Wagnerian Drama," " Notes on the Cul- 
tivation of Choral Music," etc.; but he 
never struck a happier note than he has in 
this, his latest work. It appeals to every 
lover of music, though Mr. Krehbiel mod- 
estly disclaims the attention of professional 
musicians. It is doubtful if there are many 
of that class who would not enjoy reading 
this book; yet it has evidently been written 
with a genuine desire to reach and benefit 
a far more numerous class — those who are 
fond of music, but in the vague, untrained 
way due to lack of knowledge. For these 
people, Mr. Krehbiel analyzes the elements 
of music, defines the kinds, describes and 
explains the composition and scope of the 
orchestra, outlines the various divisions of 
pianoforte music, classifies opera and treats 
of the value of choral music. His knowl- 
edge of the history, purpose and meaning of 
music is apparent in every line, and is im- 
parted with wonderful clearness and force. 
He has sifted the learning of a lifetime into 
a form and compass within the reach and 
understanding of everyone; but he has 
served a higher purpose, as well, for no one 
can read this book without being inspired 
with a desire to know more of music, both 
by hearing the best and by studying its 
historical and intellectual side. 

The sales of " How to Listen to Music " 
have already been enormous and will surely 
increase as the fame of the book grows. 
It is seldom so much of value can be had 
for $1.25. Twelve fine half-tone plates il- 
lustrate various orchestral instruments, 
each in the hands of a master. The public 
owes a debt of gratitude to Mr. Krehbiel 
and to Messrs. Chas. Scribner's Sons, his 
publishers. 



Percy Selous and H. A. Bryden have 
written an interesting book entitled " Tray- 
el and Big Game." It is a collection of 
disconnected stories of hunting trips, made 
by the authors in various parts of _ the 
.world. The following chapter headings 
indicate the nature of the book: "By sea 
and land;" " Hunting and trapping in 
Canada;" "Desert hunting;" "Leopard 
hunting in Bechuanaland:" "After griz- 
zlies in the Rockies;" "Hunting wapiti 
and moose in North America;" " Lion 



160 



BOOK NOTICES.— PUZZLE CORNER. 



161 



hunting in South Africa;" "Lions again;" 
" How I shot my rhinoceros;" " Shooting 
hippopotami on the Limpopo river;" 
" Once more in the Rockies;" " Giraffe 
hunting;" " After buffalo and zebra." 

There are several full page illustrations 
by C. Whymper but they are not so good 
as several of our American artists would 
have made. English artists are away be- 
hind the Americans in the matter of wash 
drawings. 

Travel and Big Game, by Percy Selous and H. A. 
Bryden. Longmans, Green & Co., New York. 

" Life and Immortality; or Soul in Plants 
and Animals," is the name of a new book 
by Thos. G. Gentry. This is a carefully 
prepared study of the life and habits of 
many of the smaller birds and animals, as 
well as of certain plants. The book con- 
tains 489 pages and many illustrations. 
These latter are not, by any means, what 
they should be, in an artistic sense; yet 
they are in the main correctly drawn, and 
the pictures are thus highly instructive. 
There are many new and interesting facts 
brought out, in this book, and it will cer- 
tainly be of great benefit to students of nat- 
ure. 

Life and Immortality, or Soul in Plants and Animals ; 
by Thos. G. Gentry, Sc. D. Burk & McFetridge Co., 306 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia ; $2.50 



Charlie Fee, General Passenger agent of 
the Great Northern railway, is always doing 
something handsome for the public, and 
his " Wonderland " book, for '97, is one 
of the most beautiful souvenirs he has ever 
put out. The pictures in it are a perfect 
panorama of the great Northwest. They 
portray the wheat fields, the cattle ranges, 
the hunting and fishing countries, the fruit 
orchards, the mining camps, the mountains 
and that greatest of all wonders, the Yel- 
lowstone National Park. 

You can get this book for 6 cents in 
stamps, by mentioning Recreation, and 
it is worth $2. Write Chas. S. Fee, G. P. A. 
N. P. Ry., St. Paul. 



The Erie Railway Co. has issued 2 beau- 
tiful books, one entitled " Summer 
Homes," and the other " Fishing on the 
Picturesque Erie." Both are beautifully 
and artistically illustrated, and contain a 
great deal of valuable information. The 
reproductions from photographs are 
among the finest I have ever seen and no 
one can look at them without longing to 
be among the hills or on the waters they 
so charmingly represent. Write D. I. Rob- 
erts, G. P. A., 21 Cortlandt st., N. Y., for 
copies of these books, inclosing 6 cents in 
stamps. Say you saw it in Recreation. 



catalogue I have ever seen. It abounds in 
half tone reproductions of photographs, of 
a large number of the famous steam and 
naphtha yachts of the country. Many of 
these pictures are works of art, in which all 
amateur photographers, especially, will de- 
light. Yachtsmen will examine them with 
keen interest and every lover of art will 
appreciate both the pictures and the typo- 
graphical and press work of the book. 

Altogether this is a catalogue that every 
reader of Recreation should have. It can 
be had for the asking, if you mention this 
magazine. 



PUZZLE CORNER. 

HIDDEN LETTER PUZZLE. 

There are just seven letters in 
My bi-syllabic name, 
Three vowels and 4 consonants, 
With 2 of each the same. 

The first 2 are in Wheeling seen, 
Two in Lawn Tennis stay, 
The fifth in Coaching, but the sixth 
And last are in Croquet. 

In playing golf on Scottish links 
My whole is often found 
Its fragrance cannot be excelled 
Where'r it doth abound. 

ENIGMA. 

I am composed of 20 letters and of ingre- 
dients which are absolutely pure. 
My 4, 9, 7, 13 is a part of the face. 
My 14, 10, 19, 1 is a part of the ear. 
My 18, 17, 11, 20 is a bivalve. 
My 8, 2, 16, 6 is a vegetable. 
My 15, 5, 3, 12 is a house made of cloth. 
My whole is useful all the year round, but 
invaluable in warm weather. 

Here are 2 new puzzles. A package of 
merchandise is offered each person who 
solves it. This offer is good until Septem- 
ber 30, '97. 

Always state on what page the ad. is 
printed, which contains the involved word. 



I received my gold watch and thank you 
sincerely. I am much pleased with it, as 
it is better than I expected. I intend work- 
ing harder than ever for Recreation. 

Eddie Cousins, Toronto, Ont. 



I received the Premo camera you sent 
me, as premium for 20 subscriptions to 
Recreation. I am much pleased with it, 
and recommend your magazine to all. 

O. Vermilye, Sandwich, 111. 



The Gas Engine & Power Co. and Chas. 
L. Seabury & Co., Morris Heights, N. Y., 
have lately issued the most beautiful yacht 



Thanks for the Ideal reloading tool, 
which I received O.K. I have tested it and 
find it complete. Can hardly tell the shell 
I loaded from the factory one. 

A. McKay, Seckerton, Ont. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



HOW TO USE BROMIDE PAPER. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Editor Recreation: Mr. P. F. Shea, 
Chicopee Falls, Mass., requests some ama- 
teur photographer to inform him, through 
Recreation, how to use Eastman's bro- 
mide paper. He does not state whether he 
wants to use it for contact printing or for 
enlarging purposes. However, I have had 
some experience in both, and take pleasure 
in stating my modus operandi. The Hy- 
drochinon developer suits me as well as 
any, for either negatives or bromide prints. 
The powder form, as supplied by Eastman, 
is convenient to use and keeps a long time. 

Of course, bromide paper is entirely dif- 
ferent from printing out papers, on account 
of its being so much more sensitive, which 
necessitates special care to prevent being 
fogged by light, and on account of the 
image not showing until developed. For 
these reasons the paper is treated more like 
a negative. Bromide has one great advan- 
tage over printing out papers, in that it can 
be manipulated at night. Flashlight ex- 
posures can be made, the negatives devel- 
oped, and bromide prints made, in one 
evening. 

For contact work, from either film or 
glass negatives, I use an ordinary printing 
frame, for exposing, and with the average 
negative allow say 15 seconds exposure, to 
the light of a good oil burner, about one 
foot distant. If daylight was used for ex- 
posing, probably 1-10 of this time would 
be sufficient. The Eastman enamelled pa- 
per comes in 2 grades — hard and soft. The 
latter seems the better for artificial light. 
Of course, with bromide paper the tone is 
obtained entirely in developing; so that 
when the print is dark enough you throw 
out the solution; then rinse once or twice, 
and immerse in the fixing bath. 

In enlarging I use a No. 5 Folding 
Kodak. The window in the dark room has 
a slide in the centre, which lifts up with a 
cord, and the opening is covered with a 
ground glass frame having a groove in the 
front into which the negative carrier slides. 
The kodak is placed on a shelf, just in front 
of the negative carrier, with the back to- 
ward the negative, and the focussing glass 
removed. The back of the camera is 
dropped down and the case connected with 
the negative frame by black cloth, to keep 
the light from entering the room excepting 
through the lens, in which way it reaches 
the exposing table, standing in front. This 
table is simply a large box, in a vertical 
position, with the side next to the camera 
covered with white paper. The image is 
focussed sharply, by means of the focussing 
lever, after which the shutter is closed, the 



sensitive paper put in position by pinning 
at the corners, and the exposure made. 
Of course, the desired size of the print has 
previously been secured by moving the box 
back and forth. 

The most difficult part about enlarging is 
to secure the correct length of exposure. 
This can easily be ascertained by making 
some trial exposures. Tack a small piece 
of paper on the exposing table and try it, 
for say one minute. On developing you 
can easily tell whether it is over or under 
timed. If the latter, the development will 
be slow and the print will be faint. If over 
timed, it will develop quickly. It should 
develop about the same as a negative. 
This applies also to contactprints. 

One great advantage in making prints by 
enlarging is that you can vignette out any 
part of the negative so as to give the bal- 
ance more exposure. This can be done by 
the hand or with a piece of cardboard, cut 
in a suitable shape. Of course, a small 
stop in the lens will give sharper prints 
than a full aperture. Any kind of a camera 
can be fitted up for enlarging purposes. 
Daylight is best, as condensers, which are 
quite expensive, are not required. 

W. W. Day. 



MAKE THEM LOOK THE OTHER WAY. 

I must once more call the attention of 
amateurs to the great mistake many of them 
make, of allowing their subjects to gaze at 
the camera. I receive photos nearly every 
day that are unfit for publication, on this 
account, and that otherwise contain much 
good material. 

Now comes one showing a team, stalled 
and apparently broken down, in the woods; 
but the 4 hunters and the driver, instead of 
making any effort to repair the damage, or 
to get the team out, are sitting quietly in the 
wagon and staring at the camera in order to 
have their pictures taken, and in order that 
their friends may all know them when they 
see the picture. It would seem that practi- 
cal men would have been employed in try- 
ing to get out of the difficulty. Even if they 
had only made believe they were busy, and 
if the plate had been exposed on them at 
such a time, the picture would have been 
full of interest; but as it is, it merely shows 
that the condition of affairs was brought 
about simply for the purpose of having the 
picture taken. It is therefore entirely 
worthless. 

All amateurs should study the pictures 
shown on the cover, and on the lower half 
of page 411, and the lower half of page 430, 
of June Recreation, and on pages 5, 6, 7, 
and 16 of July Recreation. Here are ideal 
photographs. The situations are worked 



162 



RECREA TION. 1 63 



11 



Definition of the word 

KODAK 

The Standard Dictionary says: 
"Kodak is an arbitrary word con- 
structed for trade-mark purposes. 

We originated and own this trade-mark. 
No camera is a "Kodak" unless manufac- 
tured by the Eastman Kodak Company. 

Don't let the clerk sell you any other 
camera under the name of "Kodak." 

If it isn't our make, it isn't a "Kodak." 

Bicycle Kodaks, $5.00 to $25.00. Booklet/™. 

" You press the button, 

We do the rest!' 



$2,853.00 in Prizes for 
Kodak Pictures. 

$1,475.00 in Gold. 

Send for "Prize Contest" 
Circular. 



EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



164 



RECREA TION. 



up purely for the purpose of making good 
pictures, yet one would think none of the 
subjects knew they were being photo- 
graphed. It looks as if they had merely 
been caught in the act; as if they were en- 
tirely unconscious of there having been a 
photographer anywhere near them. 

If you want to photograph a man, in con- 
junction with a deer he has killed, or a 
string of fish he has caught, put him at 
work, measuring, dressing, hanging up, or 
in some way looking after and looking at 
his trophy. If you cannot prevent him 
from looking at the camera in any other 
way, get a big club ready and threaten to 
hit him between the eyes, if he turns them 
toward you. 



RED SPOT ON PRINTS. 

They appear on all styles, varieties and 
brands of paper, whether it be albumen, 
platinum, bromide, carbon, glace or aristo. 
They come from the hypo, and in most 
cases can be traced back to the washing of 
the negative. 

An under-washed plate, or negative, after 
it comes from the hypo or fixing bath, will 
cause you endless trouble, from start to 
finish. 

Red spots, on all brands of paper, are 
due to the careless way in which you handle 
prints while having hypo on your fingers, 
from toning. First you begin to tone, 
and the first print, second and third are 
giving you complete satisfaction. You 
imagine you are on the road to success and 
that you know it all, now. The next mo- 
ment you take up your fourth, fifth and 
sixth prints, which are still in the gold bath, 
and behold you find a red speck on one, a 
long red mark on another and a big thumb 
mark in the centre of your pet print. Then 
you wonder what the matter can be. Pos- 
sibly you neglected to wash your hands, 
after placing your first prints in the hypo 
bath, and handled these prints with the 
hypo still on your fingers. 

Never, in any case, place any chemicals 
in platinum toning dish or gold toning 
dish but their own respective baths. If 
you do you will never be able to use them 
for toning again. The platinum bath dish 
must not be used for gold bath, and " vice 
versa." They will become absolutely use- 
less for toning purposes if you do. Soap, 
of all kinds, is also disastrous (except cas- 
tile). 

Mrs. C. W. K., New Haven, Conn. 



This is the time for amateur photogra- 
phers to be making pictures for Recrea- 
tion's 3d annual Photo Competition, and 
I trust all who are interested in this art, 
will improve present opportunities. You 
are now thoroughly familiar with the wants 



of Recreation, in this line, and should be 
able to profit by the experience of the past 
2 years. Strive for novelty and originality. 
in everything you do. Aim to surpass, in 
every respect, your work and that of your 
competitors entered in the former compe- 
titions. 



APPLYING COLOR TO LANTERN SLIDES. 

If moist water colors are to be used, it 
will be found that the film rather repels the 
water, in places, and absorbs it unevenly 
at other places. To minimize this, keep 
the brush rather dry, i.e., use as little water 
as convenient, and add to the water a little 
" prepared oxgall " (to be bought of artists' 
colormen). As the application of colors to 
slides now-a-days is almost entirely re- 
stricted to flat washes for diagrammatic 
purposes, e.g., maps, plans, drawings of ap- 
paratus, etc., etc., it is important to use as 
large a brush as convenient, and not to go 
over the same place more than once. — The 
Amateur Photographer (English.) 



I am a reader of Recreation, and would 
not be without it for twice the price. Will 
you kindly say, through its columns, that 
I would like to exchange photos with 
other amateurs. I make what I consider 
good pictures. I get a great deal of infor- 
mation from Recreation and hope the 
boys will continue to write their experi- 
ences. D. B. Fales, Plattsburgh, N. Y. 



Where would you aim at a grizzly, if he 
were walking slowly by, at 50 yards? This 
is a mighty serious question, when you 
come to sit down and think of it. Take 3 
shots at the one on page viii, and send in 
your score. 



If you have sent in a club of subscriptions 
to Recreation, and have gotten your pre- 
mium, and if it be satisfactory, please tell 
all your friends about it and advise them to 
do likewise. 



Please send me the names and addresses 
of all the sportsmen of your acquaintance, 
in order that I may send them sample 
copies of Recreation. 



" Madge surprised me last night." 

"What did she do?" 

" Threw a book at me." 

" — and smashed the lamp? " 

" No; it broke my new eye-glasses." 



" Queer about law in this country." 

" What is queer? " 

" It is able to stop vitascope picturesof 
prize fights, but it isn't able to stop prize 
fights." 



RECREA TION. 



i6< 




'REMOS 

PRODUCE 

PERFECT 

PICTURES 




Pre mo 

Cameras 

Have achieved an enviable reputation the world 
over. Their PERFECT construction and ease of 
manipulation, combined with grace, beauty, and 
superb finish, have placed them in the front rank, 
and they are to-day the Favorite Camera with the 
foremost Amateur and Professional Photographers. 



MADE IN 



20 



DIFFERENT STYLES 
AND SIZES 



Special Designs for the Sportsman and Tourist 



CATALOGUE MAILED FREE 



Rochester Optical Co*, Rochester, N* Y* 



PUBLISHER'S DEPARTMENT. 



METAL BOATS. 

The following will interest all anglers 
and duck shooters: 

Boston, Mass., April 5, 1897. 
Mr. W. H. Mullins, 
Salem, Ohio. 

The metal ducking boat I obtained from 
you, last summer, was received at the Me- 
gantic Club House, on Spider lake, P. Q. 
I spent several weeks there, soon after the 
boat arrived, and had an opportunity to test 
it under all conditions of water and 
weather. I was surprised to note the fine 
behavior of the little craft in a rough sea. 
In skilful hands I think it can be kept per- 
fectly dry under any conditions of sea 
which are found in our inland bodies of 
fresh water; and the best feature about it 
is that if by unskilful handling it fills, it 
will not sink. My boat will float nicely 
with more than 700 pounds of weight in it; 
and has, when filled with water, sustained 
the weight of a man and 3 boys. I am quite 
positive that with 2 men it might be de- 
pended on, if filled with water. There is no 
room for doubt that it is the safest boat of 
the kind afloat. This feature is of the ut- 
most importance when one has boys about, 
who are not always as careful, in a boat, as 
they should be. 

For shallow water, or for poling up a 
shallow rapid stream, I found the metal 
boat excellent. I was fearful that drawing 
it over pebbles, or running it into stones, 
might dent or destroy it; but such was not 
the case. It had a good deal of such usage, 
and is just as good now as when I received 
it. The only mark of wear, which "was vis- 
ible, was the scraping of the paint off the 
bottom. It is a great advantage of your 
metal boats that they may be taken from 
the water, wiped dry, painted and as soon as 
the paint is dry put into the water again. 
The slow drying out process, which is nec- 
essary with wooden boats before they are 
ready to be painted, is wholly avoided. 
Where many boats are in use, and it is de- 
sirable to have them constantly in readi- 
ness, this is a valuable feature. Yours truly, 

Wm. A. Macleod. 

Mr. Mullins writes me: " I shipped a car- 
load of boats to Denver, Col., about 2 
weeks ago, and immediately on their arrival 
there, received an order for another car- 
load, duplicating the first order." 

He is having a large trade on his metal 
boats, receiving many orders from Europe, 
as well as from all portions of the United 
States. 



make a thorough analysis and a series of 
tests, of the Sanitas preparations, to deter- 
mine their exact powers and qualities. The 
man selected for this important work was 
A. B. Griffiths, Ph.D., F.R.S. (Edin.), 
F.C.S. (Member of the Chemical Societies 
of Paris and St. Petersburg, author of " A 
Manual of Bacteriology," " The Physiol- 
ogy of the Invertebrata," etc.). His report 
has lately been printed and may be had by 
writing the Sanitas Co., 636 W. 55th Street, 
New York. 

This report is exhaustive and is deeply 
interesting. It should be read by all who 
are interested in maintaining proper sani- 
tary conditions in their homes, their offices 
or in public institutions of any kind. 

Professor Griffith's concluding remarks 
are as follows: 

There is no doubt that " Sanitas Oil " 
and " Sanitas Fluid " are most powerful dis- 
infectants; consequently they should not 
only be used for disinfecting rooms, hos- 
pitals, barracks, prisons, etc., but also em- 
ployed in the treatment . of infectious dis- 
eases — such as cholera, diphtheria, scarlet 
fever, measles, glanders, typhoid fever, 
tuberculosis, puerperal fever, etc. 

My investigations prove that the " Sani- 
tas " preparations are most valuable disin- 
fectants or germicides. 



The Burton automatic adjustable handle 
bar is certainly a great invention for wheel- 
men. 

It is provided with a locking device 
which can be locked and unlocked while 
riding, and which will remain rigid by 
means of compensating devices, which take 
up the wear of the lock. 




The American and Continental Sanitas 
Company employed an expert chemist to 



It is made of the best seamless tubing. 
Interior working parts are of steel and the 
grips of aluminum. These grips are hol- 
low, are ventilated, and can be adjusted to 
any desired position, .as you ride. It is ex- 
ceedingly restful to the hands to occasion- 
ally change your grips from one position 
to another. 

This new bar. is made by Thomas Kane 
& Co., 64 and 66 Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 
Ask for a descriptive circular, mentioning 
Recreation. 



166 



PUBLISHER'S DEPARTMENT. 



167 



The Forehand gun you so generously 
sent me, as a premium, is a beautiful weap- 
on, and shoots as well as it looks. I can- 
not thank you too much for the munifi- 
cence that placed so valuable an arm in 
my hands. 

Recreation talks for itself, and I am 
sure many of your readers do not compre- 
hend the plan you have adopted for in- 
creasing its circulation, or you would keep 
the various factories running, on your or- 
ders alone. 

I have no hesitation in saying you are 
publishing the cleanest sportsmen's journal 
in America, and one that the entire family 
may read with profit and interest. I say, 
sincerely, long life to Recreation and its 
editor, and wish them every success. They 
will always have a good word from 

Jno. Boyd, Toronto, Ont. 



The 20th Century Bicycle Headlight is 
said, by those who use it, to be one of the 
best bicycle lamps ever made. 

It is made in 2 sizes, the larger being de- 
signed for country roads, and for tandems. 
This larger size is known as the " Tan- 
dem," and the regular size, of last year, is 
known as the " Standard." 

A good way to find out all the details of 
construction, of this lamp, is to write the 
makers for a catalogue. Address Betts 
Patent Headlight Co., 17 Warren St., N. 
Y. Mention Recreation. 



Two correspondents of Recreation 
have lately given testimony as to the ex- 
cellence of Vim Tires, and I am glad to add 
mine. I am riding a pair of these tires and 
the way they hold their position on wet 
asphalt, even in making short turns, is 
mighty reassuring. Few wheelmen who 
have once ridden Vim Tires would ever 
ride any other. 



I have done well,- in my fly-tying busi- 
ness, and every fly has been sold through 
my ad. in Recreation. Another maga- 
zine solicited an ad. from me. I finally 
consented to place one, but got no business 
from it, and hereafter will stick to Rec- 
reation, the leading magazine in this 
country. 

Dr. Wm. Greenshields, Romeo, Mich. 



If you have any idea of buying a trunk, a 
gripsack, or a gun case, write Crouch & 
Fitzgerald, 161 Broadway, New York, for a 
catalogue. They make mighty good furni- 
ture. I have used their trunks 20 years and 
have seen many a baggage smasher throw 
up his hands and admit that he could not 
break them. 



" I cannot longer keep the wolf from the 
door," he sighed, his head sinking deject- 
edly on his breast. 



Thus he sat until his wife came and 
kissed his throbbing temples and sought to 
cheer him. 

" Perhaps the wolf will go around to the 
back door," she whispered. 

It was woman's way of reflecting on the 
bright side of things. She hadn't much use 
for a side she couldn't reflect on. — Detroit 
Journal. 



" Freddie, why did you drop the baby on 
the floor? " 

" Well, I heard everybody say it is a 
bouncing baby, and I wanted to see it 
bounce." — Boston Traveller. 



I received the Premo D camera yester- 
day, and am very much pleased with it. It 
is a great deal better than I expected, and 
an expert photographer, who looked it 
over, said I could not get a better one, any- 
where, for the money. 

Albert L. True, Lancaster, Mass. 



If you know any sportsmen who are not 
yet readers of Recreation send me their 
names and addresses and I will send them 
sample copies. Thus you will confer a favor 
on them, as well as on me. 



Received my Bristol rod on the 20th of 
April, and many thanks for your prompt- 
ness. It is a very handsome rod, and one 
that will do good service. 

H. H. Melcher, Cumberland Mills, Me. 



Being myself a practical printer and engaged, with my 
father and brother, in the publication of a newspaper, I 
cannot see how you can make such wonderful inducements 
to secure subscriptions, when your magazine is worth 
double the price you ask for it. Unquestionably, you must 
have an enormous .circulation to do this. 

F. N., Helena, Mont. 



Your journal affords me and my family much pleasurable 
reading, and your puzzle page helps while away the even- 
ings, besides being a profitable mental occupation. Rec- 
reation occupies a prominent place on my reception room 
table, and I never fail to put in a good word for it — an easy 
matter, since it also speaks for itself. 

S. S. Davidson, L.D.S., Ottawa, Can. 



I like Recreation better than ever. Have* read it 2 
years, and hope never to be without it. I consider it an ed- 
ucator in the highest order of sportsmanship. I see only one 
way to educate the boys of our town to true sportsmanship, 
and that is to have them read Recreation. 

Thos. A Harrison, Burnet, Tex. 



I enjoy reading your excellent magazine more than any 
of the others I take; and although it is cheaper than the 
others, I think it excels in quality as well as quantity. I 
especially enjoy the excellent reproductions of the amateur 
photos which it contains. 

C. F. Worthen, Barre, Vt. 



Recreation is the most interesting periodical I have read 
I read it from cover to cover, and can hardly wait till the nex 
number is out. I wish it would come oftener. 

• J. G. Danner, Baltimore, Md. 



Recreation should find its way into every family. The 
illustrations alone are well worth the price. 

M. V. Turner, Huntsville, Mo. 



i68 



RECREA TION. 




(Taken on a Carbutt Orthochromatic Plate.) 
By Alois Beer, Photographer to Emperor of Austria. 

To Obtain Artistic Results 

as much care must be used in the selection 
of the Plates or films as the Camera. 

CARBUTT'S PLATES AND FILMS 

(STANDARD FOR 20 YEARS) 

Give Universal Satisfaction 

Also J. C. DEVELOPING TABLOIDS, put up in 
3 sizes, price 25c, 40c, 75c 

If you intend competing for prizes let us assist you 
in winning by the aid of our Plates, Films, and De- 
veloper. For sale by all dealers. Catalogue free. 

JOHN GflRBUTT, jracYiSi. MladelpMa,Pa. 



Camera * 



Quad 



No Separate 
Parts / / / 

3£x3£ inch Plates 

Eminently 
Practical 

Handsomely cov- 
ered with leather 



X^vtrc* *fce f\Ci Send 2c. stamp for sample 
filCC, %P£.W photograph and boc 




booklet 




B 



uckcyc 

Twelve Expo- 
sures without re- 
loading. Loaded 
. in daylight* 

Simple and ef- 
ficient* 

Price, $8.00 Send t r ikref ated 

€♦ Sf fi- 3. Jhffcony § go. 

591 Broadway * * * « flew Yorlc 



If you are in need of 

A Camera that 
will produce a * 
Perfect Picture, 

obtain 

The HAWK-EYE, Jr. 

which will be found . . & ^ & & 

a faithful friend at all times. 

The simplicity of its working parts enables the novice to obtain results that will astonish 
old photographers. Size, 4§ x 4! x 6£ in. Photo, 3% x 3* in. Weight, 20 oz. 

LOADS IN DAYLIGHT, USES EITHER ROLL FILM OR GLASS PLATES. 

Send for Catalogue, giving description of all kinds of DDirP <Cft rtn 

Cameras and Supplies. rl ylvCf jJO.UU 

THE BLAIR CAMERA CO., 471 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 




RECREATION. xvii 



Si_Baby Wizard 




Gamer 






Js tie 

Itfeal Camera 

Only 2^X5^x 6% inches ] 

for TOURISTS, WHEELMEN 

OR SPORTSMEN GENERALLY 



Fitted with our Extra Rapid 
Rectilinear Lens funequaled in 
this country), and the Bausch 
and I/omb Optical Company's 
Iris Diaphragm Shutter. 

Complete with Carrying Case 



$25.00 





Same without rack and pinion, for focussing, and swing back 



$20.00 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



Manhattan Optical Co*, Cresskill, N* ). 



XV111 



RECREA TION. 



tittle Puck Camera $2.00 

Sent Prepaid on Receipt of Price 




For picture 2^x2%. Capacity six pictures 

The most complete camera of its size ever put on 
the market for the price. Adapted for time and instan- 
taneous pictures. Compact, light, and easy to work. 
Camera is handsomely covered with black grained 
leather. Fitted with achromatic lens and safety shut- 
ter. This camera takes plates and supplies of standard 
size. Do not buy until you have investigated the 
merits of "Little Puck." Puck illustrated catalogue 
free. Send two 2-cent stamps for sample photograph. 



SWEET, WALLACH & CO. 

Cameras, Kodaks, and Supplies of all Kinds 
225 Wabash Avenue, Chicago 



THE REMEDY. 



J. H. K. 



If in your city life 

With its turmoil and strife, 

You like to think 

Of the river brink; 

Or of some quiet nook 

By a woodland brook, 

Where there's plenty of trout 

That are a sailing about; 

And where sometimes a deer 

Will come without fear, 

To drink in the stream 

While you idly dream; 

If the Creator above 

And nature you love 

'Twill be a vacation 

Just to read Recreation. 



I wish to thank you for the Premo B. 
camera, I received some time ago. It's a 
beauty and I am very much pleased with it. 
John C. Strubing, Elgin, 111. 



I received the 40-82 Marlin rifle you sent 
me, for 21 subscriptions to Recreation, 
and am well pleased with it. Accept my 
sincere thanks. 

R. Haskell, Ottawa, O. 



r— : 



. < n — mi m m-^^m* 




Do you Know about | 

The New Camera?! 

The first one with which Amateurs can do Professional work. I 
Results equal the work of $25 cameras. No failures. No mistakes, 1 
No light-struck plates. You cau't help doing expert work with it. • 



The 



Adlakc Camera 



Made to open in 

BROAD DAYLIGHT 

For loading and adjustment* Each 
camera fitted with 1 2 single metal 
plate holders, light proof and dust 
proof. No "extras" needed. 
Get your plates anywhere. 

Our " Adlalce Camera Book'''' tells all 
about it. Free for the asMng. Sample 
mounted photograph 5cts. in stamps. 



COHPLETE WITH TWELVE HETAL i <£^^->*0 
LIGHT - TIGHT PLATE HOLDERS, I *P ■ ^^2 
Prepaid to any part of the United States ) -m~^^^ 

Takes J2 pictures on glass plates at one loading. Takes 
a standard size plate 4x5 inches and cuts a sharp, clear picture 
to the extreme edge* Is fitted with an expensive, extra rapid 
achromatic lens, specially ground. 

THE Adlake Shutter has no 
projecting levers, nothing 
to break off, give out or get 
lost, and the diaphragm has 
three stops. Camera has find- 
ers for horizontal and perpen- 
dicular pictures and two tripod 
sockets* Handsomely covered 
with seal grain leather* 




The Adams & Westlake Company, 122 Ontario Street, Chicago. 



RECREA TION. 



xix 



Ray Cameras 

$2.50 Excel all Others $5.00 




We were the first and original manufacturers of a $5*00 plate camera. 
Others have imitated us, and still imitate us 9 None excel 

10,000 Sold in One Month 

Show they have merit and why others imitate them. Before buying a 
Camera send for our descriptive circular and price-list. Sent free. Four 
cents in stamps for mounted photo made with the Ray or Ray, Jr. It costs 
less to make pictures with the Ray than any other camera of equal 
size. Complete Outfit and Instructions how to finish your own pictures for $ \ .50 

MUTSCHLER, ROBERTSON & CO. 

J77 MAIN STREET : s : ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Is a moonlight picture admissible to 
your competition? The one I send you was 
exposed from 7.30 p.m. to 12.15 a.m., Car- 
butt's eclipse film. Are the white spots 
stars, and what do you make of the thin, 
light streak over the house? Here I've been 
loading my plateholder by moonlight, for 
years, supposing it had no effect. I don't 
for a moment suppose we could take a 
prize, with our one horse outfit. Have not 
even a graduate glass; have to guess at 
everything; but if moonlight goes we'll fix 
one up as a sample. We can find another 
to go with it. What a great variety of 
photos you must get, in this competition! 
James Fullerton, Ten Sleep, Wyo. 

Answer: Your moonlight photos at 
hand. They are exceedingly interesting, 
but even the best one is scarcely strong 
enough to reproduce properly. It is hard 
to explain what a photograph must be, in 
order to reproduce by the half tone proc- 
ess, but it must be sharp, clear, deep and 
brilliant. It takes a fine lens — one costing 
$25 or more — to make a picture that will 
give creditable results in this way. There- 
fore, these pictures would stand no show 
of winning a prize in my competition. 

Your largest picture is remarkably good, 
considering the conditions, and your his- 
tory of it is deeply interesting. The white 



streak you refer to, over the house, is the 
track of a star that moved that distance 
during the time of exposure. 

You have certainly injured your plates in 
loading by moonlight. I have loaded many 
plates in camp, at night, but always, if the 
moon shone, or if there was even star- 
light, I spread a blanket, or a piece of can- 
vas, over me and over the plates, while so 
engaged. You can change plates on a dark, 
cloudy night, if entirely away from the 
camp fire, or other artificial light, without 
thus covering yourself and without danger 
of fogging your plates. 

The white spots you refer to, in the sky, 
are not pictures of stars. They are simply 
defects in the negative, or results of im- 
proper treatment in developing, toning or 
fixing. The star that made the track is the 
only one that appeared within the scope of 
your lens, at that time, which was bright 
enough to show in the picture. If others 
had shown they would have left merely 
white streaks across the plate, as this one 
did. 

Yes, I have many hundreds of photos on 
hand, many of which are not good enough 
to reproduce. They are nearly all useful to 
my artists, in making drawings, and I am 
always glad to have pictures, of almost any- 
thing out of doors. Editor. 



XX 



RECREATION. 




CCRTTBISHT 188 + 



AND CAMP. 

OUTFITS 

We manufacture the largest and most 
complete line of tents in the country, 
and our goods are celebrated for their 
wearing and waterproof qualities* 

Send 4 cents in stamps for our new 
40-page illustrated catalogue showing 
all styles of Tents and Camp furniture. 

GEO. B. CARPENTER & CO. 

202 to 210 S. Water Street. CHICAGO 

Established 1840. 



JUST THE THING... 

For Yachts and Country Homes 

the STELLA 




Our new Music Box, playing any number of tunes on 
tune sheets, without pins or projections of any kind; 
surpasses all others in quality of tone and in dura* 
bility ; it occupies little space and compares favorably 
in tone with the piano. Call and see it, or send for 
catalogue and list of tunes to 

JACOT & SON, 39 Union Square, New York 










" BEST=BIKE=SHOES," 

"BALL-BEARING," 
"RIDEMPHAST," 

"PEDALSHOE," 

"model Bicycle Shoes 

of foe Ml" 

Constructed on scientific principles. 

EASY TO RIDE IN- 
EASY TO WALK IN. 



♦ ♦ ♦ Pratt Fasteners Hold Laces ♦ • ♦ 

THE "B=B" SHOE MFG. CO., 

\2\ Duane Street, New York. 




RECREATION. 



xxi 



^ F ™ DAT ADI »*™ IRQ"* 



PAT. API 25T 1 ? 1893. 



Elastic Ribbed 

Union Suits 

are complete under- 
garments, covering 
the entire body like 
an additional skin* 
Perfectly elastic* fit- 
ting like a glove, but 
softly and without 
pressure. No but- 
tons down the front. 
Made for Men/Wom- 
en, and Young People. 
Most convenient to put 
on or off, being entered 
at top and drawn on 
like trousers. With no 
other kind of underwear 
can ladies obtain such 
perfect fit, for dresses, or 
wear comfortably so 
small a corset. 

Send for illustrated booklet 

ONEITA KNITTING MILLS """itfKS? st - 




Hose to Wear 

Last month I offered Recrea- 
tion readers a $l.OO Golf Hose 
for 75 cents and several took 
advantage of my offer. They, 
I believe, will remember me. 
Mr. Shields tells me he has 
40,000 subscribers. Then there 
are some of these whodid not buy 
a pair. To these let me say, look 
up my ad. in June Recreation, 
and if you wear bicycle hose, 
buy a pair of No. II. 

I have another offer 
to make to readers of 
Recreation. Send me 
$l.OO, and I will send you 8 pairs of socks, 
easily worth 20 cents a pair, black, tan, 
blue, or mixed colors, summer weight. If you 
don't want to risk $1.00, send me 50 cents 
for 4 pairs or 25 cents for 2 pairs. I have 
ladies' hose too, 25 cents a pair, good enough 
for anyone. In fact, I sell everything in 
hosiery. ^ If I fool you once, I can't do it 
twice. Give me an order, and, if what I send 
you is not worth your money, send back the 
goods and you will get your money back. 




GLAMOUR. 
e. c. 

Was it the fountain's rippling flow — 
The soft waves murmuring free — 

Or Daphne's voice — so sweet and low- 
Sang melody to me? 

Was it the moon's clear, silvery ray 
That moved my heart to sighs — 

That witched the happy hours away — 
Or — Daphne's tender eyes? 



A JUVENILE PARADISE. 

" I wisht'at I lived over at Junny Jinkses 
house." 

"Why— Dicky?" 

" Cos — he has more better times 'n I do; 
his sister's hump-backed, 'n' his paw's got 
a glass eye, 'n' his maw's alius in bed 'th 
th' roomatiz." 



Mary, Mary, 

Quite contrary, 
How does your cycle go? 

It's not to my mind, 

For the trouble I find, 
Is to keep both the wheels in a row. 

— Exchange. 



THE WAY TO ARRIVE. 

The speed by wheelmen reached and kept 
Was not attained by sudden flight; 

But they, while kind policemen slept, 
Went scorching onward — out of sight. 



GEO. F. WEBBER 

DETROIT, MICH. 



Dealer in all kinds 
of Hosiery 



SUMMER JOY. 

" What is your idea of perfect bliss, Miss 
Leggins? " 

" Well — a tandem and a long cycle path, 
with an ice-cream saloon at each end." 



" Chicago is a pretty wild old town, isn't 
it?" 

" Yep — pretty near as wild as Coney 
Island." 



" Papa won't let me marry Harvey, he 
has bad habits." 

" Why — did he catch him coming out of 
a saloon? " 

" No; he saw him scorching." 



Turn to my premium list, on page xlviii 
of this issue of Recreation, and see the 
tempting array of articles that can be had 
for merely a few hours' work. 



Please send me the names and addresses 
of all your friends who are sportsmen, in 
order that I may send them sample copies. 



XX11 



RECREATION. 




© 



© 



Every 
Sportsman 
Should 
Have a 



WATER-PROOF 

TENT 

A camper knows the advantages of a tent that is an absolute protection against rain 
and dampness. We secure this advantage by OUR water-proof PROCESS and 
avoid the extra bulk and weight of a fly. 

We make tents of all sizes, shapes and materials, suited to the needs of hunters, 
campers, travellers, canoeists ; also 

Water-Proof Sleeping Bags 

CANVAS BUCKETS, AMMUNITION, PROVISION, 

CLOTHING AND SADDLE BAGS, POUCHES, 

PACKS, BICYCLE COVERS, FLOOR CLOTHS, 
and many other Canvas Specialties 

Olir SlCCDinSf Btl£ 1S unic l ue > excellent in pattern and finish, and has been 

highly approved. 



O 



© 



SEND FOR CIRCULAR R, SAMPLES OF MATERIALS AND PRICE-LIST TO 

DERBY,ABERCROMBIE&CO. 

36 South Street, New York 



RECREA TION. 



xxin 



* 

* 

♦ 

* 
* 
* 

> 



The Only Practical 

Camping Bag 



IS THE 



Kenwood 



Enthusiastically endorsed by campers every- 
where — not an experiment. Now made with 
improvements suggested by usage under all 
conditions — as, for instance, the outside water- 
proof canvas cover, the middle bag and the soft, 
warm, light inner bag — to be used separately or 
combined, thus giving perfect protection from 
cold, rain or sudden climatic changes. Strong, 
durable and useful, as a hold all. 
A perfect 
shelter. 
Tents 
unnecessary. 
No uncovering. 



y ^y^ftyyyyyyyyyyyyyy^ yyf yyyf yyyyyyf f yy^Vf VVf 9f f 919 X 







are a revelation to buyers of the old, heavy 




and unsatisfactory square blankets. 




The Kenwood 
Hunting Cape 

meets every requirement of the sportsman 
"waiting for a shot," whether at a deer, 
ducks or pigeons. Better than coats. Care- 
fully made to combine all desirable features. 
Excellent as a Driving Cape. 

Price 

$15^.00 

The Kenwood Storm Hood 

for use with the Bags, or for anyone exposed to severe weather, will be found 
very serviceable and a comfort in cold or windy weather. 



Every Camper, Hunter, Angler, Prospector or Military Man should send for 
our FREE illustrated circular, about these goods and camping information 



The Kenwood Mills, Albany, n. y. 



XXIV 



RECREATION. 



(N. Y., 3318. Ed. 3— 25,000.) 

MEMORAOTJTJM OF WEIGHT. 

BATE OF MAILING. 

ORIGINAL. 



J)AY. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


QfJt<Z 1 


w 


n &Q 








y#xs 






' 







New York Postjice, 

..£.Z.^o:..'L..i39..y 

Received from, 



IN WEIGHT, AS FOLLOWS : 




No. 1 Sack, S lbs. 



€Xti} 



No. 2 Sackyg.&ffgaz) 
£/ WAV 

ml 4* 





Net weight, 
Rate per pound, 
Amount of postage, 



.01 



731,. 



1ZZ 




Postmaster. 



Receiving Clerk. 

NOTE.— It is important that this receipt be compared with its dupli- 
cate, signed by the Postmaster, and issued at the close of each month. 

Post-office receipt for May number of RECREATION. Other receipts 
cheerfully shown on application. 

A copy of RECREATION weighs y 2 lb. and the postage is I cent 
a pound. This means a subscription list of 25,600 copies a month. 
Figure it and see. Then call for further proof. 

Address RECREATION, 19 West 24th Street, New York 



RECREA TION. 



XXV 



(N. ,Y., 3316. Ed. 5—25,000. ) 

MEMOKANDUM OF WEIGHT. 

DATE OF MAILING. 




New York Post Office, 

Received from 



IN WEIGHT, AS FOLLOWS : 



/ uM.No. 1 Sack, 



3 lbs. 



No. 2 Sack, %lbs. 5j)z. 



Net Weight, 
Rate per pound, 
Amount of postage, 




Per. 




2-1-96 



Postmaster. 

t... 

Receiving Clerk. 



Post=office receipt for June number of RECREATION. The post- 
master does not stuff the returns for any publisher. 

This is for subscriptions only. The News Co.'s trade of n,ooo 
a month is not included. Total circulation, 40,000 a month. 

If interested call for further proof. 

Address RECREATION, 19 West 24th Street, New York 



XXVI 



RECREA TION. 



For Sale; Good furniture and undertak- 
ing business in Goldendale, Klickitat 
County, Wash. County Seat, good farm- 
ing and stock country, located at foot of 
Cascade mountains; 4 snow peaks — Hood, 
St. Helens, Adams and Tacoma — in sight. 
Fine trout fishing in stream running 
through the town. Grouse, ruffed, sharp- 
tail, sage, and mountain; black bear, mule 
deer and goats within 50 miles. An ideal 
location for a sportsman. 

Good schools, churches, and local option 
law. Owner has an interest in, and is man- 
ager of a large wholesale and retail general 
merchandise store, that takes all his time. 
Buyer would find a choice circle of con- 
genial spirits, and though in a healthy 
climate, there is but one other undertaker 
in the county, 120 miles long by 25 to 35 
miles wide. Purchaser would have the 
assistance of 6 doctors, all sportsmen and 
jolly good fellows. 

O. D. Sturgiss, Arlington, Oregon. 



For Sale: Remington Hammerless Au- 
tomatic Ejector, 12 gauge, 7M2 pounds, 30 
inch barrels; stock 14^x2^4 drop. Good 
as new. Perfect inside and out. 

Elmer Breckinridge, Ashtabula, O. 



L. L. BALES 

...Wholesale and Retail Dealer in... 

FISH, FURS, and 
RAW SKINS 



Full information given brother sportsmen as to good 
hunting, trapping, and fishing grounds in Washington, 
British Columbia, and Alaska. 

Am well acquainted with the haunts of the elk, deer, 
bear, mountain sheep, mountain goat, moose, and 
caribou ; also with the whereabouts of all fur-bearing 
animals in this region. 



Correspondence promptly 
and cheerfully answered 



Eyerett, Wash. 



The 38-55 Marlin, which you so kindly 
sent me, was received in good shape and 
it is a beauty. 

L. C. Danner, Wormleysburg, Pa. 



The Marlin rifle came O.K., and I am 
greatly pleased with it. I think there is 
nothing living that the gun will not kill. 

Ralph Bateman, Fort Sherman, Idaho. 



Many thanks for the beautiful Marlin 
rifle I received for getting up a club. To 
say that I am pleased is putting it mildly. 
Win. H. Foss, Lynn, Mass. 



The Marlin rifle, which I earned from 
you, is a fine one and I am well pleased with 
it. Don M. Harris, Zanesville, O. 



I have received the Premo B., which you 
sent me as premium, and it is grand. 

Albert B. Bauman, Chicago, 111. 



A GOOD ONE ON ED. 

The following story was told me while 
on a camping expedition in Northern Wis- 
consin, last summer. I have never seen it 
published and it may be new: 

Two young men, while sailing on one of 
the Northern lakes, were struck by a sud- 
den squall, which capsized their boat. John 
was a strong, sturdy youth, while Ed. was 
weak and delicate. Both held on to the 
boat for some time, struggling to keep their 
heads above water, but Edward's strength 
was gradually waning; and with one more 
grasp at the floating boat he told John 
he could not possibly hold on any longer. 
John reassured and encouraged him, but 
despite all efforts he saw his friend was 
gradually growing weaker. 

" Just another minute, Ed., and help will 
come." 

" No," replied Edward, "and now that my 
time has come — I am not afraid to go — only 
the thought of my dear mother — and that 
dear girl — whom I've loved — so dearly — for 
so long — the thought of leaving them al- 
most crushes me. Take this message to 
them John: Tell them I — died with a strong 
heart — and left messages — of love — and af- 
fection — for them." 

John — with a heavy heart — promised all; 
but importuned the poor boy to summon 
strength for a short time anyway. Ed- 
ward's strength was now but a memory and 
with one hastily Uttered prayer — and 
breathing the name of his beloved — his 
hands loosened; his face paled, and he sank 
in 4 feet of water! 



^ ^ 



Some Rare * 
Opportunities 

♦..YOU CAN GET... 

A $75 Bicycle for 75 yearly subscrip- 
tions to Recreation. 

A $35 Hammerless Breech - Loading 
Shot Gun for 35 yearly subscriptions. 

A $40 Camera for 25 subscriptions. 

A $20 Gold Watch for 20 subscriptions. 

A $20 Repeating Rifle for 20 sub- 
scriptions. 

A Good Single Barrel Shot Gun for 
\ 5 subscriptions. 

A Single Shot Rifle, or 

A Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, or 

An Automatic Reel, or 

A Kenwood Sleeping Bag 
For 10 subscriptions. 

WHY DON'T YOU GET THEM? 

Write for premium list and sample 
copies of RECREATION 



RECREA TION. 



xxvu 



To Sportsmen and Tourists: I am lo- 
cated in Northwestern Colorado, in a para- 
dise for sportsmen. Large game abundant 
and trout fishing unexcelled. Gentle sad- 
dle horses, pack outfits, etc. Everything 
first class. Correspondence solicited. 
J. M. Campbell, Hunter and Guide, 
Buford, Colorado. 



For Sale or Exchange. — Folding canvas 
boat, new in 1896 and used but once. Will 
trade for bicycle, 12 gauge gun or 22 calibre 
rifle. C. H. Tolman, 

85 Exchange St., Portland, Me. 



WHERE TO GET BIG GAME. 

Have you located your happy hunting 
ground for next fall? If not, I will agree 
to take you to moose, elk, deer, bear, plenty 
of mountain goats, fish and grouse galore, 
providing you wish my services as guide. 
Only 40 miles from the R. R. to the hunt- 
ing grounds. Good pack outfits, tents, 
etc. Horses good and gentle. Terms rea- 
sonable. Best of references; 18 years' ex- 
perience as guide. 

Vic Smith, Anaconda, Mont. 



For Exchange. — A 30-30, '94 model Win- 
chester, pistol-grip stock, set trigger, Ly- 
man rear and front sights, with reloading 
tools for soft bullets. I wish to exchange 
same for a Marlin rifle with pistol grip, 
fancy walnut stock, or a Union Hill Bal- 
lard, with set triggers. 

E. R. Rives, Micanopy, Fla. 



Jas. L. McLaughlin: — Experienced 
Guide. Best references furnished. Elk, 
moose, deer, mountain sheep, antelope, 
lions, bear, sage hens and grouse. Best 
trout fishing in the country, within 10 min- 
utes' walk of my ranch. Would take a few 
boarders. Tourist outfits furnished on 
short notice. Address, 

Ishawood, Big Horn Co., Wyoming. 



ANY PARTY 

wanting to see the 
National Park, 

or to hunt in the 

Teton or Jackson's Hole countries, 

should write me. 

These are the best big game ranges in the United States. 
Moose, elk, deer, bear, mountain sheep, mountain lions, and all 
kinds of small game abundant; also the best of trout fishing in the 
West. 

Have put in 16 years hunting, trapping, and guiding in Wyo- 
ming, Idaho, and Montana, and know where to go for any kind of 
game you want. Write me and I will give you full particulars. 

* GEORGE WINEGAR, St. Anthony, Fremont Co., Idaho. 



For Sale: A new Ideal Loading Ma- 
chine, price $5; 3 Hills Patent Releasing 
Sparrow Traps, $5. Will take $10 cash for 
the 4 articles, or will trade anything use- 
ful, for an equal amount. 
George Burkhardt, 14 Baitz Ave., Buffalo, 

N. Y. 



I have a female cocker spaniel 3 months 
old, weight 16 pounds, jet black, with a 
small bunch of pure white on breast. Not 
broken but will make an excellent retriever. 
Would sell cheap or trade for anything de- 
sirable. C. R. Wagner. 



Who wants a Florida home? 11^2 acres 
of good land; good house, stable, air, water, 
and healthy country. Fruit — oranges, lem- 
ons and grapes. Game, such as deer, tur- 
keys, quail, rabbits, snipe, woodcock, etc. 
Price $1,000. Terms easy. 

L. Allen, Oak Hill, Fla. 



KAREZZA 

imniHtafcAon MARRIAGE. 

A bold, brave book teaching Ideal marriage, rights ol 
the unborn child,a designed and controlled maternity. 

Union Signal : Thousands of women have blessed 
Dr. Stockham for Tokology, thousands of men and 
women will bless her for Karezza. 

Arena : Karezza is worth its weight In gold. 
Sample pages free. Agrents Wanted. Prepaid $1.00. 
ALICE B. STOCKHAM & CO., 277 MADISON ST., CHICAGO. 



For Sale: Two large Moose heads, with 
horns, mounted in first-class style. Spread 
of horns, 50 and 51 inches. Horns uniform 
and perfect. A snap for someone. For par- 
ticulars and price, write 

R. Strutt, Pembroke, Ont., Canada. 



Information about Hotels, Camps, 
Summer Resorts, Farm Board, Outfit for 
Fishing and Hunting, and Guides to Maine 
woods and waters. Reliable. Free. 

Maine Information Bureau, 
Phillips, Maine. 




File Your Business 

papers, accurately and sys- 
tematically by using the 

Globe Filing Cabinet. 

Illustrated Catalogue — free. 

The Globe Co., Cincinnati, 



Cor. Fulton & Pearl Sts., N. Y„ 111 Madison St., Chicago. 

>TT'TTTTTTTTTTTTVTTTTTTTTftTTT^ 



, BlaJr's Pills 



^ A *■"*-*• j 



Great English Remedy for 

GOUT and RHEUMATISM. 



iSAFE, SURE, EFFECTIVE. 
Druggists, or 224 William St.. New York. 




A certain Cincinnati doctor returned 
from an unsuccessful snipe hunt, remarking 
to his wife, " I couldn't kill a thing to-day." 

" If you had stayed at home," was the 
unsympathetic reply, " and attended to 
your regular business, you might." 



XXV111 



RECREA TION. 



The American 
Book of the Dog 

THE ORIGIN, DEVELOPMENT, SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS, 
UTILITY, BREEDING, TRAINING, DISEASES, AND KENNEL 
MANAGEMENT OF ALL IMPORTANT BREEDS OF DOGS 

A Book for Dog Fanciers and Dog Owners 

Edited by G, O. SHIELDS ("Coquina") 

AUTHOR OF "CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," " HUNTING IN THE GREAT 

WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE," "THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA," 

"CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS," ETC. 



8vo, 700 Pages, 85 Illustrations. Cloth, $5.00; Half Morocco, gilt top, $6.50; 

Full Morocco, gilt edges, $8.00 

CONTENTS 



The English Setter. Bernard Waters, Kennel Editor 
The American Field, and author of " Modern Train- 
ing, Handling, and Kennel Management." 

The Irish Setter. Max Wenzel, Secretary The Irish 
Setter Club of America, and B. F. Seitner, Vice- 
President The Pointer Club of America. 

The Gordon Setter. Harry Malcolm, President The 
American Gordon Setter Club. 

The Pointer. Charles K. Westbrook, A. M. 

The Greyhound. Col. Roger D. Williams, President 
The Iroquois Hunting and Riding Club. 

The Deerhound. Dr. Q. Van Hummell. 

The Foxhound. Dr. M. G. Ellzey, Associate Editor 
The National Economist. 

The Bassethound. Lawrence Timpson. 

The Dachshund. William Loeffler. 

The Bloodhound. J. L. Winchell. 

The Russian Wolfhound. William Wade. 

The Beagle. H. F. Schellhass, President The Ameri- 
can-English Beagle Club. 

The Irish Water Spaniel. P. T. Madison, Secretary 
The Indiana Kennel Club. 

The English Water Spaniel. William A. Bruette. 

The Clumber Spaniel. F. H. F. Mercer, Kennel 
Editor Sports Afield. 

The Sussex Spaniel. A. Clinton Wilmerding, President 
The American Spaniel Club. 

The Field Spaniel. J. F. Kirk. 

The Cocker Spaniel. J. Otis Fellows. 

The Fox Terrier. August Belmont, Jr., President The 
American Kennel Club, and The American Fox 
Terrier Club. 



The Yorkshire Terrier. P. H. Coombs. 

The Chesapeake Bay Dog. George W. Kierstead. 

The Bedlington Terrier. W. H. Russell. 

The Irish Terrier. Dr. J. S. Niven. 

The Bull Terrier. Frank F. Dole. 

The White English Terrier. E. F. Burns. 

The Airedale Terrier. F. H. F. Mercer. 

The Scottish Terrier. John H. Naylor. 

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. John H. Naylor. 

The Skye Terrier. Lawrence Timpson. 

The Black and Tan Terrier. Dr. H. T. Foote. 

The Maltese Terrier. Miss A. H. Whitney. 

The Collie. Henry Jarrett and J. E. Dougherty, 

The Old English Sheep Dog. William Wade. 

The Great Dane (German Dogge). Prof. J. H. H. 
Maenner. 

The St. Bernard. F. E. Lamb. 

The Mastiff. William Wade. 

The Newfoundland. L. F. Whitman. 

The Bulldog. John E. Thayer. 

The Dalmatian Coach Dog. Maj. T. J. Woodcock. 

The Poodle. W. R. Furness. 

The Italian Greyhound. Dr. G. Irwin Royce. 

The Pug. G. W. Fisher. 

The Mexican Hairless Dog. Mrs. Elroy Foote. 

The Toy Spaniels. Miss Marion E. Bannister, Secre- 
tary The New York Pet Dog Club. 

The Schipperke. E. R. Spalding. 

Diseases of the Dog, and their Remedies. Dr. J. 
Frank Perry ("Ashmont "), author of " Dogs; Their 
Management and Treatment in Disease." 

Spaniel Training. F. H. F. Mercer. 



The Hon. John S. Wise, the eminent statesman and lawyer, President of the Pointer Club of America, and 
one of the most distinguished sportsmen and dog fanciers in the country, says of this book : 

" In selecting contributors to this work Mr. Shields has displayed rare good judgment. His list of writers 
embraces the names of many gentlemen who are recognized as leading authorities on the subjects of which 
they write. While those articles may, in some cases, be more or less tinged by the peculiar views of their 
authors, the book, thus drawn from many different minds, is not only very eclectic in character, but, in my 
judgment, much more correct and valuable, as a whole, than it could be were it the production of an individual. 

" The book is exceedingly interesting. It is free, too, from the sameness of expression and treatment so 
often found in books of this character, written by one man. It is, moreover, a very instructive book, and of 
practical value, in many features, to the owners and breeders of dogs. 

" A valuable feature of this book is the illustrations. Many of these are artistic and beautiful in a high 
degree. The portraits of several dogs of world wide reputation are shown, and those of many other typical 
specimens, less widely known, add to the interest and attractiveness of the work. Nearly every breed is 
illustrated, and of some breeds several good specimens are pictured." 

This book will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by 

G. O. SHIELDS, 19 West 24th Street, New York 

Or given as a Premium for 7 Subscriptions to Recreation 



RECREA TION. 



XXIX 



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RECREA TIOJST. 



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WHO KILLED THE BUFFALO? 

Jackson, Wyo. 

Editor Recreation: B. V. K. wrote that 
in 1891 the hide of a buffalo was brought 
into Jackson's Hole, which was killed on 
Crawford creek. The facts about that buf- 
falo hide are these: 

In the fall of 1891, Captain Anderson 
caused notices to be posted on trees, along 
the trail near Sargeant's ranch, at the head 
of Jackson's lake, stating the Park rules 
would be enforced in the timber reserva- 
tion. That same fall 5 men built a cabin 
on the South side of Warm Spring creek, a 
few hundred yards below the trail, and win- 
tered there; or at least while they were not 
camping in the Park. This cabin is about 
8 miles inside the timber reserve, and about 
Yz of a mile from the Government station 
on Snake river. Is it possible Captain An-" 
derson did not know they were there? 

None of these men were residents of 
Jackson's Hole. The truth is the men 
killed 3 buffalo on Crawford creek, or 
near it. One of them was brought to the 
Hole and finally sold to a man in Rexburg, 
Idaho. The other 2 I suppose were taken 
out through the Park; one shipped to 
Prouty, in New York; the other sold in 
Montana. 

The buffalo in the Park are practically 
gone. The real cause is that the syndicate 
and the soldiers have cut the winter feed 
of the buffalo and put it up for hay. The 
people of Jackson's Hole are unanimous in 
wishing the game protected, in the Park 
and in the timber reservation, as well as in 
Wyoming. 

We estimate 28,000 elk wintered in Jack- 
son's Hole; an increase of 5,000, due to 
partly restraining the Indians for 2 years. 
It cost us nearly a whole season's time, and 
got the army officers and a lot of Eastern 
people down on us. They ought to get the 
truth of both sides of the question before 
judging. S. N. Leek. 



RECREATION. xxxi 



Camping 



and 



Camp Outfits 

A MANUAL OP INSTRUCTION FOR YOUNG 
AND OLD SPORTSMEN. 

Edited by G. O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 

Author of "CRUISINQS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," 'HUNTING IN THB 
GREAT WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE," "THE BIG GAME OP 
NORTH AHERICA," " THE AMERICAN BOOK OP THB DOG," 
"AIIERICAN GAME FISHES," ETC. 



12mo. 200 Pages. 30 Illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 



CHIS book contains practical points on how to dress for Hunting, Fishing, or other Camping 
Trips; what to carry in the way of extra Clothing, Bedding, Provisions, Cooking Utensils, and 
all classes of Camp Equipage; how to select Camp Sites; how to make Camp Fires; how to 
build Temporary Shelters; what to do in case of Getting Lost, etc. It contains check lists of articles 
constituting Complete Camping Outfits; a list of the names and addresses of Guides, in various 
hunting and fishing countries, and much other information of value to Campers, and which has never 
before been given to the public. 

The instructions given are based on an experience of twenty-five years in Camping, and in the 
study of Camp Lore, Woodcraft, etc., and it is believed that the work will prove of great value to 
thousands of men and boys, who have not had such favorable opportunities for study. 
The book also contains a Chapter by 

DR. CHARLES GILBERT DAVIS, on CAMP HYGIENE, MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

ONE BY 

COL. J. FRY LAWRENCE, on CAMP COOKERY, 

A1SCD ONE BY 

FRANK F. FRISBIE on THE DIAMOND HITCH, or HOW TO LOAD A PACK HORSE 



This book should be in the library of every Sportsman, and will be sent, post-paid, on receipt 
of price, by the Author, 

G. O. Shields, 19 W. 24th St., New York. 
Given as a Premium for Four Subscriptions to Recreation 



XXX11 



RECREA TION. 




.flf S • WATSON. 

He: Why does Miss Ann Teek wear her bicycle gown all the time? 

Miss Young: So people will call her a new woman, instead of an old one. 



TREED IN THE LAKE. 

Uncle Hi is always a ready listener to 
our hunting stories. He was a great 
sportsman in his day; nor has he forgotten 
how to swing a rifle and shot gun. The last 
shooting I saw him do was knocking the 
stems off pumpkins, at 75 yards, with a 
rifle; and shooting kingbirds from his bee- 
hives. 

Last fall, when I returned from a trip in 
the Adirondacks, at Plumadore pond, I 
told him about watching for deer, at the 
East shore, behind some focks. 

" That is where I saw a wildcat, about 20 
years ago," he said. Uncle Hi had been 
watching the pond, for deer to take to the 
water when they should be pressed by the 
hounds. Hearing a noise behind him, he 
had turned. 

" I saw the biggest wildcat," he said, 
" man ever saw, not 4 rods away, standing 



with his fore feet on a log, looking at me. 
It seemed as if he was about three-quarters 
eyes. While I looked, the brute mounted 
the log. Then my hair began to come up. 
I had only a single barreled rifle, and not 
being well acquainted with wildcats, I was 
afraid if I didn't kill him instantly I might 
stand a chance of getting my coat torn. 

" Much as I wished to get his hide, I de- 
termined if that cat would let me alone, I 
would him. Knowing cats have an aver- 
sion to getting their feet wet, I backed 
around the rocks, with the water up to my 
waist, keeping my eyes on the cat, and 
waded half an hour before I dared approach 
the shore. When out of sight of the ani- 
mal I worked my way to the bank, and ran 
for camp. 

"I didn't tell the boys how I got wet; 
thought it wasn't necessary for them to 
know everything." 

M. P. E., Clarenceville, P. Q. 



KECKEA TION. 




Off upon av^bM)\y^ 

■ Tfme-yovj Wtfty SiSav^,- 

Then,witF)0\H' a lighting", 

k>\j can t)ove a s^uvfe-i 

TJhovigt) iHooks so niskyV 

Yom hav'e learned, we !]>ope--> 

Yovi can always safely { 

Shave with Williams' Soap. 

r^icty and creamy? latter, 

v\t\d if never dries, 

Tfooucfhtfjrovjgb wind and sunshine 

Fa si' lt)e nid e r f li e s ; 

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v\nd v'ovfli le-arn to like-, 

An \mvi$\ia'l pleasure-, 

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the points in which for- half* 
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SttAVING OH A BIKE! 1 



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Williams' Shaving Stick. 25c 

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Williams' Luxury Tabiet 25c 

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LONDON : 64 Great Russell St., N. W. SYDNEY : 161 Clarence St 

"Williams' Exquisite "Jersey Cream " Toilet Soap, 15 cents. 




Williams' Shaving Soap. 

^Barbers'j 

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Exquisite also for Toilet and 

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XXXIV 



RECREA TION. 



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For information, address 

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C. E. LAMBERT, Gen. Pass. Agent 

3 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York 



KICKER'S LOGIC. 

A man entered the City Clerk's office, in 
Tacoma, a few days since, to take out a dog 
license and in the course of the transaction 
had many and varied complaints to make 
about the injustice of such a tax. However, 
after paying his dollar he remarked that the 
aforesaid dog was a female, was inoffensive, 
etc., whereupon the clerk said the ordi- 
nance provided that the license for female 
dogs was $2 instead of one, and demanded 
another dollar. After another seance at 
high kicking the man paid the additional 
dollar. 

As he turned to go a sudden thought 
seemed to strike him and he said, " I guess 
I had better take out a bicycle license, 
while I'm here. How much is it? " 

The clerk said " $1 please.". 

" But this is a lady's bicycle. Is it not 
$2?" 

The clerk fainted and was carried into 
the vault, to cool off. — Tacoma " Ledger." 



You will do your friends a good turn by 
sending me their names and addresses, in 
order that I may' acquaint them with the 
nature of Recreation. 



Mr. Bradley returned from Newberry, 

and brought me the dear little Davenport 

gun which you awarded me as a premium 

for 15 subscribers. We all admire it greatly. 

Mrs. E. E. Bradley, Deer Park, Mich. 

the... 

ADIRONDACK../ 

MOUNTAINS <$-&• 

"THE GREAT NORTH WOODS" 

A marvelous wilderness, abounding in beauti- 
ful lakes, rivers and brooks, filled with the great- 
est variety of fish. 

An immense extent of primeval forest, where 
game of all kinds is to be found. 

This wonderful region— located in Northern 
New York— is reached from Chicago by all lines, 
in connection with the New York Central ; from 
St. Louis by all lines in connection with the New 
York Central ; from Cincinnati by all lines in 
connection with the New York Central ; from 
Montreal by the New York Central ; from Bos- 
ton by a through car over the Boston & Albany, 
in connection with the New York Central ; from 
New York by the through car lines of the New 
York Central ; from Buffalo and Niagara Falls 
by the New York Central. 



A 32-page folder and map entitled " The Adirondack 
Mountains and How to Reach Them " sent free, post- 
paid, to any address, on receipt of a i-cent stamp by 
George H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, New 
York Central & Hudson River Railroad, Grand Cen- 
tral Station, New York. <* 



RECREA TION. 



XXXV 



Prm Button f^nifc 

FOR 

Hunting, Fishing and Camping 

Our 4-inch or 5-inch jack-knife is in- 
valuable in emergencies when you need a 
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SENT POSTPAID 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED 
CATALOG _ 





" Any rules and regulations out at that 
mountain hotel where you were, Lamp- 
ton? " 

" Well — just one: — ' Guests who get up 
to see the sun rise are not allowed to pull 
the blankets off the guests who don't.' ' 



" Do you bathe your children yourself, 
Mrs. Flutterby? " 

" No — Mr. Flutterby always bathes the 
children, and I wash my dogs." 



" Gracious — is that a procession coming 
down the pier? " 

" No; Mrs. Tiffington is going to Eu- 
rope, and her entire family had to come to 
the vessel with her — to carry the bundles 
she forgot to put in her trunk." 



" Pop had to rent a tandem yesterday." 
" What for? " 

" To move cook over to our new house, 
she weighs 200." 



jar 



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Sceptre, 1 lb., $1.30 ; H lb., 40cts., postage paid, 

CATALOGUE FREE. 

SURBRUG, 159 Fulton Street, New York City. 



XXXVI 



RECREA TION. 



MULLINS' 

"GET THERE" 

SAFETY 
DUCKING BOAT 

Made in Galvanized Steel, Manganized 
Bronze and Aluminum, with Standart's 
Extension Air Chambers and Canvas 
Gunwale, for use in very rough water. 
The staunchest and most seaworthy 
boat on the market. An ideal craft for 
sportsmen. Will last a lifetime. Needs no repairs. Send for catalogue with full description. 

W. H, MULLINS, 226 Depot Street, SALEM, OHIO 




I have read every number of Recreation for 2 years, and 
am very much pleased with your articles on " Guns and 
Ammunition," also with your game notes. 

Roswell C. Beecroft, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 



Recreation is a daisy. If it keeps on improving for the 
rest of the year, as it has for the past 4 months, what will it 
be then ? P. E. Clock, Oneida, N. Y. 



May number of Recreation is the best and most artistic 
number yet printed. Success to you. 

J. Chas. Hahne, Warren, O. 



Recreation is the best periodical I have ever read. Just 
the thing for sportsmen. 

W. H. Eppehimer, Pottstown, Pa. 



The May number of Recreation at hand, better, more 
charming, than ever. W. H. Nelson, Forest Glen, Md. 

Recreation is right up to snuff. 

T. B. Parker, So. New Berlin, N. Y. 



Recreation is a charm to me, and to all members of our 
family- I can hardly wait till it comes again. I don't see 
how you can get up such a charming sportsmen's magazine 
for $1. L. Boettger, Callicoon, N. Y. 

I enclose $1, for renewal subscription for Recreation. I 
regard it one of the best publications in its line, and take 
pleasure in recommending it to all of my friends. 

Frank A. Johnson, Chicago, 111. 



Recreation is the best sportsman's magazine published, 
and I must have it regularly. 

C. A. Lodge, Bement, 111. 



Recreation is one of the best journals of its kind pub- 
lished. Carl F. White, Cleveland, O. 



T think Recreation the best sportsman's periodical pub- 
lished. L. M. Taylor, New York. 



Recreation is the best magazine I ever read. 

H. N. Treworgy, East Surry, Me. 



Sectional View 





Globe Bearing. 



Don' t believe imitators of " H EN DRYX" standard 

goods when they say their Fishing Reels "are NOW 

as good as HEN DRYX". The fact that they 

imitate proves the "HENDRYX" i s the recognized 

standard line of Fishing Reels. Ask your dealer for 

them. 
Andrew B. Hendryx Co., New Haven, Conn., U. S. A. 




I can't do without Recreation. It is the next best thing 
to being out on the hunt oneself, and in many of the ar- 
ticles, I live over again my Western experiences, without 
the trials and hardships incident to a winter's campaign. 
Dr. J. S. Kennedy, Chambersburg, Pa. 



You make the best magazine ever published, relating to 
the rod and gun, to say nothing of other sports. 

H. E. Ward, Milford, Mass. 



I am pleased with your magazine. Like it better every 
month. Many of the sportsmen here take it and all like it. 
Herbert Warner, Middletown, N. Y. 



Your magazine is the best book of its kind I have ever 
come across. A. A. Haney, Fort Worth, Tex. 



Recreation is all right. Give it to the game and fish 
bristle backs. Ray C. Longbothum, Mansfield, Pa. 



Recreation is good. 



A. G. Carpenter, Plainfield, N. J. 



J. B. CROOK & CO. Established 1837 

^1180 Broadway, Cor. 28th Street 

NEW YORK CITY, U.S.A. 



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or Trout, Salmon, and Black Bass.' 
Send 7 cents for catalogue. Mention Recreation. 



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IDEAL MANUFACT , 'g'C0 i ,' HEW HAVEN.' CONN.. U, S. A.<qf ' at C ?he 

p 5, cs:. 




TWO .'■:. '--.«:.• '..<:.'. « ■■;. i 

Mr. and Mrs. R as fatherly zziA 

wm|i a number oi young ladies and gen- 

•." *rrr. *rr. . :—.:i"w -_ -?.>.. r * * - i .'/:•• 

V Y The party was on its '96 

cam pi ng trip, on the East slope of the Blue 
mountain*. Mrs, R ia«! Miss V 



themselves to a berry patch, not far away, 
<—: •■■■*'«: r\':-.z -.'- : - :.e : ■-':■. . : . 
Y ;-': ' ;-.- ■-:"■. -.-- ■-. . ' :' ; ' : - - / . -. . 
up they saw a big: black bear, busily en- 

. t knowing: whether to faint or to hare 
the bear chew them up the y held a ** pow- 
wow " and concluded to give their friends 
a surprise. Then the ladies slipped back 

reeded on their killing: expedition. Find- 
ing the -bear in the same position they 
opened fire on him. Two of the bullets 
entered on the right side and went dear 

\"-.;Y' Or.*: v 'r-:^ rir.^.i -~ i:: "■: 
broke die bear's back bone. Then the 
ladies finished him with a shot in the head. 
This story had been told many times 
before I heard it, and when I asked to see 
the skin it had so shrunken that to my un- 
prejudiced eye it was merely the pelt of 

E. C G . Portland, Ore. 



THE OTHER SIDE OF IT. 

Mammoth Hot Springs. Wyo. 
::tor Recmatiost: An article in Rec- 
iox last October, by S. K. Leek, said 

ties permission to hunt on the timber 
serve Mr. Leek makes a misstatement 
Captain Anderson showed no partiality to 



Anderson has done more to protect the 
game in the Park than any other superin- 
tendent Since Felix Burgess left the Park, 
as srout„ it has been a hard matter to get a 
man to fill Ins place. 

Mr. Leek also said no resident of Jack- 
son's Hole ever took part in the Irilfing of 
buffalo, but I know 2 men, personally, who 

residents of Jackson's Hole. A Mr. Craw- 
ford took out $1,700 worth of furs. 

Mr, Leek does Captain Anderson a great 
injustice when he says a few were given 

: : 



for illegally killing: elk, was to have been 
tried before Justice Culver, of Gardiner, 
Montana, but at that time, on motion of 
attorney for defendant, a change of venue 
was taken. The case was transferred to 
':.:.: h- ,; .'.-—<.- .- _;- - --- : 

was tried by jury, and die defendant ac- 

to secure conviction, in one part of the 
West, for the kiiltnz oi game out of sea- 
son. It appears that Drnmmond killed 40 

«:'> -.-J-- — j: .- -/ \r-. ' 'i : ^—.r-j ' :- 

'-.-; ;:-; i- :r -.hi: :. ' ir: :h^ v : '" r \\- : 
oi the eaters of the meat naturally went 
with the killer of the elk. 

As a restful contrast, may be cited the 

case of George B. Scott, whose trial oc- 

::—-'. - :; \- ~ -' --•: ■-''-.- ■-'.----_ -.'- 

"justice." Scott was caught in the act of 

'.'.'■■ ~^ \'.-. :^--^y^\ \ : - ■-_ -■-.-■-_' =-."•■ '— — 

' :-rt r.i: \^-~.~-^.^ '----<; '. -'-•'- :- 

■ 



xxxvni 



RECREA TION. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF IT. 

I am more than pleased with your magazine. Your re- 
productions of photographs, of game and sporting scenes. 
are elegant, and are worth more than double the price of the 
magazine. 

Enclosed find 25 cents, from this far Northwest, for the 
fresh air fund of your magazine, from 2 well wishers, who 
like to "read your pictures " and who want to help some of 
those poor children. My little girls, Hazel and Gladys, 
send this with their sympathy, and hope one or two other, 
children may be made happy, even if only for a day. 

Thos. Boyd, Winnipeg, Can. 



I have never taken any publication (and I take many) 
that gave me more real pleasure than Recreation does. 
My mind goes back to the mountains, and for a while busi- 
ness cares are lain aside. I am again among the deer, bear, 
elk and other wild animals I was so intimately associated 
with in my early manhood. 

Dr. R. Boyd Cabell, DeWitt, Mo. 



You certainly deserve credit for the way you have han- 
dled Recreation, and I wish you the splendid success you 
deserve. I have hunted all over the West — Wyoming, 
Colorado, Montana — and was a cowboy in Montana. Your 
Western stories interest me deeply. I read Recreation 
every month, and only wish it were a weekly instead of a 
monthly magazine. A. P. deFuniak, Birmingham, Ala. 



I will do all I can for Recreation. It is the best book of 
its kind I ever read. I have gotten some valuable informa- 
tion from it. One day I came across it at the news stand, 
took it home and read it from cover to cover. I went back 
and tried to get old numbers, willing to pay any price, but 
soon found the dealers always sold them all. 

G. U. Waltman, Spokane, Wash. 



Recreation is becoming very popular in this city, among 
many of my acquaintances, and it is a question of only a 
short time, when a great many more of the people here will 
know a good thing when they see it, Sportsmen who can- 
not interest themselves in Recreation should not be 
classed as such, in any sense of the word. 

E. N. Young, Minneapolis, Minn. 



I want to compliment you on Recreation. It is the best 
sportsmen's magazine published. I could not get along 
without it. I will send you a club of new subscribers, later, 
as several have asked me to send in their names, having 
seen Recreation in my office, and without any solicitation 
from me. Dr. W. L. McNamara, Kenton, O. 



Long live Recreation. We have 4 sportsmen's publica- 
tions in the house, but Recreation leads them all. Shall 
always have a good word for it as long as it stays by the 
principles it now advocates. 

E. W. Phillips, Missoula, Mont. 



Will try and interest my friends in Recreation (and in- 
deed it does not require much trying). They lose a great 
deal by not subscribing to such a feast of anecdote and in- 
formation as is contained therein. 

Jas. Thornton, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



I enclose herewith my check for $1 for another year's 
subscription. Recreation is getting grander every issue. 
The May number is a beauty. I have every number, from 
No. 1 to the present. Jno. G. Messner, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Recreation fills a field to itself. It is impartial in its 
treatment of outdoor sports. It is plain, straightforward 
and appeals to the men who do the real work afield. 

F. C. Reihl, Alton, 111. 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's magazine in this 
country, or any other, and you may rely on my being a sub- 
scriber as long as it is published. 

P. K. Rossiter, Ithaca, N. Y. 



I am greatly pleased at the way you roast those fellows 
who boast of their great strings of fish. We know some of 
the men and have a good deal of fun with them about it. 
S. S. Holmes, Baldwin, Wis. 



Recreation is charming. 

J. D. McLeod, Milwaukee, Wis. 



Recreation is the brightest and most interesting maga- 
zine published, and I heartily commend you for the way in 
which you call down the " Game Hogs." 

Theron Hill, Rochester, N. Y. 



Enclosed find $1 for Recreation. Accept my thanks for 
the fine reading and the information there is in it. It is the 
best sportsmen's magazine in existence, and I wouldn't be 
without it. John Hepner, Marion, Wis. 



Inclosed find $1 ,to renew my subscription. Recreation 
is the best periodical I ever saw, and improves each month. 
My wife looks for it as eagerly as I do. 

D. M. Hazleton, Corning, N. Y. 



I have taken Recreation for 2 years, and always look 
forward to the next number, as I know I shall have a treat. 
James Atkins, Springfield, Mass. 



I have read Recreation 2 years, and it is the best mag- 
azine of the kind published. 

C. L. Stevens, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



I like your magazine better than ever, and so long as I 
can find the dollar you can count on me as a subscriber. 
G. A. Ross, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 



I .buy your magazine at a book store, and it is great. I 
can scarcely wait a month for it. 

Fred C. Owen, Elmira, N. Y. 



Recreation is the best magazine published, and it has 
come to stay as long as I have the subscription price. 

H. A. Buell, Maywood, 111. 



I cannot do without Recreation as long as I can find one 
minute to read it. 

Frank N. Wise, Mt. Holly Springs, Pa. 



I read Recreation every month, and enjoy every page. 
It is my ideal of a sportsman's magazine. 

A. C. Bryant, Cochituate, Mass. 



Recreation is out of sight. I will get you some sub- 
scriptions for it soon. T. H. Wade, Livingston, Mont. 
He has since sent in 54. Editor. 



My husband and I are great lovers of Recreation, and 
now the baby seems to enjoy it quite as much, especially the 
pictures. Mrs. M. H. Littell, Dallas, Tex. 



I find Recreation a very satisfactory magazine. It is 
the sportsman's ideal publication. 

Fred W. Haynes, Roseburg, Ore. 



Recreation stands at the head of sportsmen's literature. 
It contains the most valuable information to sportsmen. 
Wallace J. Bundy, Colerain, O. 



I have only one thing against Recreation : it don't come 
often enough. Chas. McClellan, Dallas, Tex. 



Recreation is at the head of the list of sportsmen's 
journals. B. C. Packer, Lock Haven, Pa. 



Recreation is splendid — in fact the best of the kind I 
ever read. R. G. Goldy, Williamsport, Pa. 



Recreation is the best magazine of its kind I ever read. 
C. W. McDonell, Kensal, N. D. 



Recreation is the best'magazine I have ever read. 

John Schade, Albany, N. Y. 



Recreation is a splendid magazine. Everyone is de- 
lighted with it. Robt. D. Knapp, Danbury, Conn. 



I could not keep house without Recreation. 

F. A. Rice, Avoca, N. Y. 



Recreation is decidedly the best magazine in its line I 
ever read r Ed. Prather, Dallas, Tex, 



RECREATION. 



X X X 1 X 



tK-*H5~^-?w-^^^-^-?w-H5-^v«)?w~^'^^^ 



% 



ZUliiw 

Piano 



^ <& STYLE 7 







% 



% 



You do not have to 
pay an extravagant 
price for a first- 
class piano ««««««« 



In justice to your- 
self write for prices 
of the Wing Piano 
before you buy «««« 




The Instrumental Attachments | 

imitates perfectly the tone of the Mandolin, Guitar, Harp, Zither and Banjo, «fe 
giving the effect of an entire orchestra of these instruments playing in concert 
with the piano J&J&^£<£<£ 

SENT ON TRIAL * ^ e w '^ senc * * m "s piano, or your choice of four other styles, 

— — — — — — — — — . to any part of the United States On Trial (all freights 

paid by us), allow ample time for a thorough examination and trial in the home, and, 
if the instrument is at all unsatisfactory, we will take it back at our own expense. No 
conditions are attached to this trial. We ask no advance payment; no deposit. We 
pay all freights in advance. 

OLD INSTRUMENTS EXCHANGED 
EASY PAYMENTS 

OUR BOOK should be in the hands of every one who intends to buy a piano. It contains many 
valuable hints and instructions, and tells a great many things every buyer ought to know. We will send 
it free with our catalogue to any one who writes us. 



WING & SON, 



443 and 445 West 13th St., N. Y. City 

ESTABLISHED 1868 



xl 



RECREA TION. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF THE 
PREMIUMS. 

I am now prepared to speak in enthusi- 
astic terms of the Forehand gun received 
from you, as a premium, last fall. I am ex- 
ceedingly well pleased with it, and the good 
work it does, and do not cease to con- 
gratulate myself that I had the good fort- 
une to become acquainted with you and 
with Recreation. 

H. O. Watrous, Carbondale, Pa. 



The Hollenbeck gun you sent me, for 35 
subscribers, shoots as good and as hard as 
any high grade gun I ever shot. Both bar- 
rels will make a pattern of 75 per cent., 40 
yards, 30 inch circle, No. 7 chilled shot. 
Any one wanting a good gun should get 
up a club for Recreation. 

C. Hoppenstedt, Newburgh, N. Y. 



The Bristol steel rod I received from you, 
as premium for 10 subscribers, is all I could 
desire. Have caught quite a number of 
black bass, and a jack salmon, that gave the 
rod as severe a test as one could ask; and 
it does not show the least sign of the strain. 
John F. Dunckel, Springfield, Mo. 



My Bristol steel rod arrived all right, 
and I am delighted with it. It is nicely 
balanced and exceeds my expectations in 
every way. All the boys say it is a fine rod. 
No man who loves to fish should be with- 
out a Bristol rod. 

Fred Libbey, Concord, N. H. 



Please accept my sincere thanks for the 
Bristol steel rod you sent me, for 10 sub- 
scriptions. In every particular it is exactly 
as advertised. It is just what I want for 
good hard service. 

Harry H. Beaver, Cadillac, Mich. 



My son received the 4x5 Premo D. 
Camera yesterday, from the Rochester Op- 
tical Co. He is very much delighted with 
it and of course appreciates your and their 
prompt attention. 

John B. Hutchings, Louisville, Ky. 



I received my Bristol steel rod promptly, 
and it is a hummer. I believe it the coming 
rod for expert anglers. I am very thankful 
to Recreation for the liberal premium. 
Long may the magazine live. 

E. N. Hudson, Reedsburg, Wis. 



I have received from the Rochester Op- 
tical Co. a beautiful Premo B. camera, for 
the club I sent you, for which please accept 
my sincere thanks. My friends all admire 
it, and I am sure it is a good one. 

Wm. B. Haynes, Akron, O. 



I have received the Marlin repeating rifle 
you sent me, as a premium for 20 subscrip- 
tions, and it is a beauty. I could not wish 
a better premium for the little work I did. 
I got all my subscribers in 4 days. 

Albert K. Mueller, Cleveland, O. 



I received the Premo camera, sent me as 

a premium, and am highly pleased with it. 

I have developed some negatives and the 

work is much better than I had expected. 

W. B. Davis, Union, Ore. 



I have received the Bristol steel fishing 
rod and it is a beauty. It is the best rod I 
own. I am very proud of it, and am greatly 
obliged to you. 

Frank Malloy, Freeland, Pa. 



I received the camera and the carrying 
case, from the Blair Camera Co. O.K. It is 
a fine looking camera, and I thank you for 
your promptness in sending it. 

A. S. Bailey, Cobalt, Conn. 



I received the Bristol steel rod, which is 
just what I want. I have 2 other old-fash- 
ioned rods, of split bamboo, but consider 
the Bristol the best all-round rod made. 
R. A. Walker, Meriden, Conn. 



The camera which you sent me works 
splendidly. I didn't know a thing about 
taking pictures before I got it, but I can 
make a fairly good one now. 

Frank Clarkson, Worcester, Mass. 



I received the Marlin rifle, for the 25 sub- 
scriptions, promptly, and if pleasure was a 
combustible, I would be a millionaire by 
embarking in the fuel business. 

Lloyd Ashlock, Carrollton, 111. 



The Premo A. camera you sent me, as a 
premium for 25 subscriptions, came to-day, 
and I am more than pleased with it. This 
is certainly an easy way of getting a good 
camera cheap. F. W. Kutz, Easton, Pa. 



The elegant Premo D. camera arrived 
O. K. and I assure you I was glad to get 
it, as it enabled me to secure several me- 
mentoes of my first experience in camp. 
Al. Helborg, Chicago, 111. 



I received the Yawman & Erbe automatic 
reel, for 10 subscriptions, and it is highly 
satisfactory. 

John Wm. Judson, Lawrence, Mass. 



I have received the Marlin revolver, for 
10 subscribers, and it is a beautiful piece of 
mechanism. 

J. M. Kerr, Milltown, N. B., Can.. 



RECREA TION. 



x\i 



Ok muskoka and miaiand 
Dkc$ Resorts 

Reached only by the 

Grand Trunk Railway System 

Is the Paradise for not onlv hunters, fishermen, and canoe- 
ists, but also those iu search of health, where comfort 
and pleasure can be obtained economically. 

The woodland and lake scenery would satisfy the most 
critical tourist. 

Camping outfits can be purchased cheaply, or guides, 
thoroughly acquainted with this region, fully equipped 
for camping, can be secured readily. 

Parties can be furnished with names of guides, and by 
communicating with them, make all necessary arrange- 
ments in advance. 

The following fish and game, in season, are to be 
found in abundance, the variety of which is not surpassed 
by any other sporting region in the world : 

Fish.— Bass, pickerel, brook trout, lake trout, white- 
fish, perch, sunfish, salmon, trout, sturgeon, catfish, 
herring, and muskalonge. 

Game.— Deer, partridge, rabbits, pigeons, ducks.geese, 
plover, bear, woodcock, snipe, grouse, and moose. 

A few of the other Principal Resorts.— Andros- 
coggin Lakes, the White Mountains, the salmon re- 
sorts of Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, 
Lake St. John region, the River St. Lawrence, the 
Thousand Islands. 



For descriptive book showing routes and rates, apply 
to M. C. Dickson, D.P.A., Toronto, Ont.; D. O. Pease, 
D.P.A., Montreal, P.Q.; L. R. Morrow, C.P.A., Chicago, 
111.; R. McC. Smith, S.P.A., Cincinnati, O. 



Chas. M. Hats, Geo. B. Reeve, W. E. Davis, 

General Manager, Gen. Traffic Manager, G. P. & T. A., 

Montreal, P. Q. Montreal, P. Q. Montreal, P. Q. 

Frank P. Dwyer, E. P. Agent, 273 Broadway, New York. 



A New Lake 
and New Trout 

Rear Admiral Beardslee, of the Pacific 
Coast Squadron, U. S. N., about a year ago 
brought to the attention of tourists and 
anglers a beautiful lake in Northwestern 
Washington, that contains new varieties of 
monstrous trout. 

President Jordan, of Stanford University, 
California, an authority on fishes, pro- 
nounced them entirely new to science. They 
are very large, weighing from 10 to 13 pounds 
and ranging from 10 to 30 inches in length. 
They are caught by trolling, at a distance of 
30 feet or more below the lake's surface, and 
are the gamiest sort of trout, full of fight. 
Already, anglers have gone from the far 
east to Lake Crescent to enjoy the rare sport 
found there. 

A long chapter on this beautiful lake and 
its finny inhabitants, located in the heart of 
the Olympic Mountains, is found in the 
Northern Pacific New Tourist Book, Wonder- 
land '97. Send six cents for it to 

CHAS. S. FEE 

, General Passenger Agent 

St. Paul, Minn. 



♦♦•to * W Pleasure Resorts of... 

Cexa$ ana Gulf of mexico 



TAKE 




Via CHICAGO, KANSAS CITY, or 
ST. LOUIS 

WAGNER BUFFET SLEEPERS 

FREE " KATY n CHAIR CARS 

For further information, address 

W. S. ST. GEORGE, Gen. East. Agt. 
409 Broadway, New York 

UNEQUALED 
ATTRACTIONS 

ON THE LINE OF THE 





FOR TOURISTS 



It traverses the Grandest Scenery ef 
the Rocky Mountains, and reaches all 
the Health and Pleasure Resorts of 
the Mid-Continent. 



<-H£**> 



Sportsmen 



will find in scores of local- 
ities along this line game 
worthy of their skill, such as 
Bear, Mountain Lion, Coyotes, Elk, Deer, Ante= 
lope, Mountain Sheep, Feathered Game of all 
kinds. And everywhere are Beautiful Streams 
well stocked with Trout. 

For Gun Club Rules, Game Laws, and a?iy in- 
formation relative to localities for Hunting, or for 
information in regard to the UNION PACIFIC 
SYSTEM, call on or address any General or 
Traveling Agent of this Company. 

R. TENBROECK, Gen'l Eastern Agent, 

287 Broadway, New York City 

E. DICKINSON, E. L. LOMAX, 

Gen'l Manager, Gen'l Pass. & Tkt. Agt., 

Omaha, Neb. 



xlii 



RECREATION. 



* The*** 



> St. Denis 




\ 



Broadway and Eleventh St. 

Opposite Grace Church 

NEW YORK... 



EUROPEAN 
PLAN 



ur pHERE is an atmosphere of home 
comfort and hospitable treatment, 
at the St. Denis, which is rarely met 
with in a public house, and which in- 
sensibly draws you there as often as 
you turn your face toward New York." 




^W>= 




20 BOOKS - - 

ON 20 DIFFERENT SUBJECTS, 
BUT ALL RELATING TO SOME 
DELIGHTFUL PHASE OF 
AMERICAN TRAVEL, VIA 
"AMERICA'S GREATEST RAIL- 
ROAD." 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE SENT 
FREE, POST-PAID, ON RECEIPT 
OF A 1-CENT STAMP BY GEORGE 
H. DANIELS, GENERAL PASSENGER 
AGENT, NEW YORK CENTRAL & 
HUDSON RIVER RAILROAD, GRAND 
CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK. 



NEW MODEL REVOLVER 

Has important advantages over all other makes. Rebounding Lock, -which obviates all liability 
of accidental discharge when closing, after discharging cylinder. Simple and superior method of 
holding cylinder to barrel. Can be removed instantly by pressing a catch in front of the cylinder. 




Workmanship unexcelled. All parts interchangeable, and made from drop forgings. Frame 
is made of cast steel. No malleable iron about it. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

Mention Recreation 



FOREHAND ARMS GO., Worcester, Mass. 



RECREA TION. 



xliii 



ASHLAND 



FOURTH AVE. 
and 24th ST. 



Two block! from 
Madison Sq. Garden 



HOUSE 

...HEADQUARTER FOR SPORTSMEN 



American and. 



European Plan 

RATES : 

Rooms, with board, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 per day 

Rooms, without board, - $1.00 and upwards 

Breakfast, 75 cents 

Lunch, - - - - 5° 

Table d' Hote Dinner, - 75 



A RARE OPPORTUNITY 

A Willsie Pocket Camera, Valued at $5.00 

As a premium for 5 yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation. This Camera makes a picture 2^x2?^ inches, 
and can be loaded with 24 cut films. You can get the 
5 subscriptions in one hour. 

Write This Office for Camera Catalogue. 



Cycle Touring in England at small ex- 
pense. All about it, for 25c. 

Arthur Munson, Stamford, Ct. 



HYPNOTISM 

TAUGHT BY MAIL. 

Not Dif f icnlt. Spare 
^Moments Sufficient. 

j\ T ot a natural gift; anyone 
<:an use it Latent powers 
developed and the otherwise 
impossible accomplished. 
jOur* the most reliable se- 
Jcrets ct the art, making al 
Uusceptible to this strange 
(influence. Induced by con- 
Itact. crat a distance by mail 
lor telegraph. Control loved 

|ones and save them from ^ 

i error. Habits, w^aKnesscs and diseases cured. Noth- 4 
X ing aids all classes of every age. sex and condition, 4 
X in business and social life more than this knowledge. < 
^ Everything private. Established twenty years. Most ^ 
X 9 advanced and reliable methods. Valuable information < 
X upon request. Address. Prof. L. H. ANDERSON, i 
X R. C. 67. Masonic Temple, Chicago. 111. L. 5. A « 

f f T?f TTTTTTTfTTTfTTTTTTTTTTTf 1 




Wyoming... 

For Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Deer, Elk, 
Fish, Goat, Moose, Sheep, Grouse, 
Duck, and Sage Chicken Shootinp, 

address H. D. DeKALB, BIG PlNEY,WVO. 



RUPTURE 



ABSOLUTELY 



CURED 



without truss, operation or con- 
finement, on strictly scientific 
professional principles, based on 
an experience of many years. 
My method of treatment is known only to myself, and I object to long 
letters explanatory thereof. An interview is positively necessary for those re- 
quiring information. 

Complete cure effected in 6 to 8 weeks ; one treatment each week, 
with no detention whatever from business. 

SAOREDO 

Care F. C. PRESTON, 98 Hudson Street, New York 



Manufacturers of the celebrated Gold Medal 
Camp and Folding Furniture, and 
Folding Portable Bath-tubs. 



GOLD MEDAL CAMP FURNITURE MANUFACTURING CO., « AC U t s E .' t ™ ,s - 

None so Portable, none so Thoroughly 
Good and none so Comfortable. 

Thiscut representsourGold Medal Fold- 
ing Bath-tub. These have been in use a 
year and have proved entirely satisfactory. 
The frame is constructed with our patent 
metal joints, in fuch a way that it folds in an 
exceedingly small space. The cover is 
made of very heavy, closely woven duck, 
coated with pure, thoroughly refined rubber, 
cured in such a way that it is tough and 
elastic. The duck is specially rubbered for 
us and we warrant it not to crack. This tub 
is made with no separate parts and is so 
arranged that it can be picked up and car- 
ried even when it contains water for the 
bath ; and empties by simply raising one 
p.:»« $1(1 f)fl end, the other forming a trough through 
S riceiJUU.UU which the water is poured into a pail. It is 
in every way a practical bath-tub, strong 
enough to hold the heaviest person, and win 
last ageneration. Folds 5 ft. by 5 in;square. 
Sendfor/rte Catalogjie of Camp and Fold- 
ing furniture and Bath-tubs. 




Look for our 
GOLD MEDAL 
CAMP BED in 
this space next month 



GOLD MEDAL 
FOLDING BATH-TUB 

WANTED. Mention 
Write for Discounts. Recreation 



xliv 



RECREA TION. 



This is a picture of Sewell New- 
house, inventor of the celebrated 

NEWHOUSE STEEL TRAPS 

known the world over as the 
best traps made for catching fur- 
bearing animals. Send to 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Ltd., Kenwood, N. Y. 

for catalogs, prices and discounts. 





FOSTER & CO. 3% 



Dealers in 



Natural History 
Specimens 

Animal Heads and Horns, Bird Skins and Eggs, Dead 
Game Panels, Indian Relics and Photos, Modern Indian 
Goods of Utility, Minerals, Fossils and Shells, Bicycles 
and Sundries, Natural History Supplies and Publica- 
tions, Sporting Goods, Curios, etc. High-Class Taxi- 
dermy, Group Work. 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. 



I am a lover of all that pertains to sportsmanship, and an 
ardent admirer of Recreation. Have read it from Vol. I, 
and we are old friends. I admire your course ; ever up- 
holding the right, and decrying and holding up to exposure 
and ridicule, the wrong. 

Dr. A. H. Fulton, Knoxville, la. 



I am heartily in sympathy with your ideas, as expressed 
in Recreation, and you have my sincere wishes for your 
success. B. W. Abbey, Barre, Vt. 



I am a young taxidermist, and find your photographs of 
animals and birds, as well as your general information, of 
great value. W. C. R., Waterford, Me. 



May Recreation is the best yet. I do not know how 
you are going to improve on it. 

A. C. Dennison, Milltown, Me. 



Taxidermists' Supplies 



When you get 
a good speci 
men of bird, 
fish, mammal 
etc., that you 
would like to 
get mounted, 
send it to us. We 
will do it right and 
also make the price 
right. 

Send five cents for 
new Taxidermists' 
Catalogue. 



Artificial 



Taxidermist, 

217 Madison St., Chicago. 




We prepare 
and mount all 
specimens of 
natural histo- 
ry true to na- 
ture, in the 
best style ot 
the Taxider- 
mist's art, at 
reasonable 
prices. 
We also keep a 
complete line of 

Oologists* 
and 

Entomo= 
logists' 
Supplies 



Chicago pastors claim they are not afraid 
of bicycles. That may be explained on the 
ground that they never have tried to cross 
a boulevard, on a pleasant Sunday after- 
noon. — Chicago Post. 




Ernest L. Brown 
The Minnesota 
Taxidermist 

Does true and artistic work 
at reasonable figures. 

WARREN, MINN. 



ft QUIET, RESTFUL, IDEftL RESORT 

for sportsmen, tourists, and their wives, with 
comfortable beds, nice table, good fishing and 
hunting in their season, is 

the Crow's ilcst, Sandy Bay, lttoosebead Cake 

Rates reasonable, and only four miles from the 
railroad terminus. For particulars, write 

BIGNEY & ROWE, Proprietors, GREENVILLE, ME. 




AMMUNITION 

Try .22 Peters' Short Smokeless 

and New Victor Shells, 

Loaded with King's Smokeless 



FOR ACCURACY, VELOCITY, STRENGTH, 
PENETRATION AND CLEANLINESS. 



INSIST ON YOUR 

DEALER 
SUPPLYING YOU 

THE 

PETERS 

CARTRIDGE 

CO. 

CINCINNATI, O. 

BOB SAbG BVBRYWHES8 - 




RECREATION. 



xlv 



trout 
itto 



SOME GOOD GUIDES. 

Following is a list of names and addresses 
of guides who have been recommended to 
me, by men who have employed them; to- 
gether with data as to the species of game 
and fish which these guides undertake to 
find for sportsmen. 

If anyone who may employ one of these 
guides finds him incompetent or unsatis- 
factory, I will be grateful if he will report 
the fact to me. 

ALASKA. 

William York, Juneau, moose, bear, deer, sheep, goats 

and small game. 

CALIFORNIA. 
Chris. Ringsin, Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, goats, 

water-fowl, and salt water fishing. 
John Broder, Visalia, trout, deer, bear, grouse, and 

quails. 
S. L. N. Ellis, Visalia. ditto 

COLORADO. 

J. M. Campbell, Buford, elk, bear, deer, antelope, 

and grouse. 
Chas. Smith, Buford, d 

Frank Allen, Dotsero, Eagle Co., 
Charles Allen, Dotsero, Eagle Co., 
John Meier, Sweetwater Lake. Dotsero P. O., 

Eagle Co., " 

Wells and Patterson, Meeker, '* 

R. W. McGee, Debeque, 

Lem Crandall, Debeque. rt 

Sam. T. Himes, New Castle, '* 

Luke Wheeler, Pinkhampton, " 

Nathan Fisher, Gunnison, " 

W. H. Hubbard, Glenwood Springs, " 

W. L. Pa.ttison, Buford, 

J. E. Borah, Glenwood Springs, " 

Ed. L. Stockton, 527 nth St., Greeley, " 

FLORIDA. 

C. L. Farnham, Avon Park, bear, deer, turkeys, quails, 

ducks, black bass, etc. 
Oliver Tinny, Ozona, Hillsboro Co., deer, bear, turkeys, 

quails, ducks and salt-water fishing. 

E. M. Reynolds, Fort Myers, ditto 

Wm. Webb, Osprey, Manatee Co.. " 

Frank Guptill, Osprey, Manatee Co., " 

W. J. Meyer, Tarpon Springs, " 

Robt. E. Hammond, Key West, " 

Frank Carson, Ft. Meyers, " 

E. T. Robinson, Keuka, " 
Carson Bros., Frostproof, " 
J. L. Sandlin, Punta Gorda, " 
Oliver Archer, Clearwater, " 
L. W. Scroggins, Homeland, '• , 
Capt. Jas. Argo, Oviedo, " 

F. J. Adams, Sanford, " 
C. B. Bailey, Winter Haven, " 
W. H. Steacy, Pt. Tampa City, tl 
Wm. J. Lyon, Interlacken, '' 
L. L. Sutton, Sutherland, »* 
M. B. Carson. Frost Proof. Polk Co., " 
W. D. Isler, Eagle Lake, " 
George W. Hawthorn, Hawthorn, '• 
C. H. Hill, Maitland, 

J. E. Bowen, Laughman, " 

Margan Bass, Kissimmee, " 

B. C. Lanier, Leesburg, "■ 

John Hunter. Winter Park - , «' 

H. Shipman, Haskell, " 

Robert James, Emporia, *' 

Alex. Brown. Martin. " 

W. J. McCullough, Boardman, 1 " 

Frank Smith, St. James City •• 

Jinks McCreary, Higly, " 

Baldwin Cassady, Lisbon, l ' 
W. H. Howell, Centre Hill, 

Ed. Brown, Dunedin, " 

G. B. Lawson, Lake Maitland, " 
J. H. Maddox, Wauchula, " 
Will Montgomery, Arcadia, " 
T. E. Fielder, Calvinia, " 
W. F. Hays, Webster, •♦ 



IDAHO. 

W. L. Winegar, Egin, Fremont Co., elk, bear, deer, an- 
telope, mountain sheep, trout and grouse. 
Geo. Winegar, St. Anthony, Fremont Co., ditto 
R. W. Rock, Lake, Fremont Co., 

Ed. Stailey, Lake, Fremont Co., '• 

J. S. Sadorus, Sarilda, Fremont Co., " 

Geo. W. Rea, Orange, Fremont Co., •• 

Wm. Fraser, Beaver Canyon, " 

IOWA. 

Geo. Jenkins, Spirit Lake, ducks, prairie chickens, black 

bass, etc. 

Wilbur Clark, Spirit Springs, ditto 

MAINE. 

Wm. S. Emery, Blakesley Camps, Eustis, moose, cari- 
bou, deer, trout, grouse. 

Algie Spearin, Moro, ditto 

Charley Condon, Moro, " 

Wm. Atkins, Oxbow, " 

Miles D. Arbow, Oxbow, " 

Frank Cram, Oxbow, l ' 

Nathan B. Moore, Bingham, " 

Charley Powers, Medway, " 

Charley Hale, Medway, " 

Walter Dacey, Medway, . " 

Elliott Rich. Bethel, ' " 

John C. Lamb, Kineo, " 

John H. Quelty, Kineo," " 

Winn McKenney, Patten, " 

Mitchell Francis, Patten, " 

Royal E. Paine, Stratton, " 

Charles Hathaway, Medway, " 

Victor Scott, Millinockett, " 

C. O. Norton, Dover, " 

Benjamin J. Woodaid, Dover, " 

Benjamin Woodard, Dover. " 

Col. N. D. Brown, Roach River House, " 

Alonzo Davenport, Shesuncook, " 

Ichabod Smith, Greenville, « 

Ernest Ham, Guilford, " 

Charlee Capen, Capens, " 

Ed. Masterman, Moosehead, " 

Marsh Carlton, Rangely, " 

Freeman Tibbetts. Rangely, " 

Fred Reed, Medway, " 

Dan Hale, Medway, " 

Will Meyer, Eustis, '« 

Charles Haley, Eustis, " 

H. R. Horton, Eustis. " 

Abner McPhiters, Norcross, " 

Albert McPhiters, Norcross, " 

Horace B. Cushman, Norcross, "■ 

Irving Hunt, Norcross, " 

Wm. O. Shaw, Dobsy Lake, Washington Co., " 

Ran. Day, Princeton, Washington Co., " 

Geo. C. Jones, Carritunk, " 

Geo. Douglass, Eustis, " 

David Quint, Eustis, " 

Davis Moody, Stratton, " 

Gus Jones, Stratton, " 

Fred Viles, Stratton, " 

John Darling, Lowell, «« 

Joe Francis, Old Town, «* 

Sebat Shay. Old Town, " 

Louis Ketcham, Old Town, " 

Granville M. Grey, Old Town, " 

L. A. Orcutt, Ashland, " 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Recommended by Dr. Hitchcock, Cliftondall, grouse, 
squirrels, salt water fishing. 



MICHIGAN. 

Bony Markelty, Negaunee, deer, bear, grouse, trout, 

black bass, and muskalonge. 
Thos. Starr, Alpena, ditto 

MINNESOTA. 

C. L. Porter, Glenwood, ducks, geese, prairie chickens, 

and black bass. 
E. L. Brown, Warren, ditto 

Jack Baldwin, Jackson, " 



xlvi 



RECREA TION. 



SOME GOOD GUIDES {Continued). 

MONTANA. 

M. P. Dunham, Woodworth, elk, bear, deer, antelope, 

mountain sheep, trout and grouse. 
G. H. Heywood, Red Lodge, ditto 

W. H. Ryther, Columbia Falls, 
Quincy Myers, Columbia Falls, 
Theodore Christiansen, Columbia Falls, 
Mr. William Jackson, Browning, Montana, 
W. A. Hague, Fridley, 

E. E. Van Dyke, Red Lodge, 
Vic. Smith, Anaconda, 
James Blair, Magdalen, 
George Whitaker, Gardiner, 
Richard Randall, Gardiner, 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
P. Marden, Wolfboro Falls, black bass, grouse and quails. 
Frank Britton, Wolfboro Falls, ditto 

Blake Abbott, Wolfboro Falls, 
Ned Norton, Colebrook, moose, caribou and deer. 
John Bresette, Diamond Pond, ditto 

Henry Bresette, Diamond Pond, 
Lafayette S. Covell, Connecticut Lakes, caribou, deer, etc. 

NEW JERSEY. 
Billy Throckmorton, Mannahawkin, ducks, geese, brant, 

shore birds, grouse, salt-water fishing. 
Dory Hulse, Mannokoking, Ocean Co., , ditto 

Ernest Worth, Bayville, Ocean Co., 
James Emmans, Jr., Swartswood Lake, Swartswood, 

black bass, pickerel, quails and rabbits. 
Mr. Riker, Culver's Lake, B^nchville, perch, black bass 

and pickerel. 

NEW YURK. 

Cal. Blanchard, Upper Jay, deer, grouse, rabbits, squir- 
rels and trout. 
Abe Rundle, Eldred, Sullivan Co., ditto 

Eugene Scrafford, Eighth Lake, Old Forge, 
Ceylon Clarke, Piseco, Hamilton Co., 
Joe White, Horseshoe Pond, Tupper Lake, Frank- 
lin Co., 
Edson Brown, Spring Cove, Franklin Co., 
William Boyea, Owl's Head, Franklin Co., " 

Will Simonds, Franklin Fall, Franklin Co., 
Harry Freeman, Axton, Franklin Co., 

F. A. Young, Big Moose, " 
Danforth Ainswarth, Big Moose, 

Chris Wagner, Beaver, 

Chester Elliot, Beaver, 

Edw. Ball, Old Forge, 

Garrie Riggs, Old Forge, 

Eugene M. House, Glendale, 

Geo. P. Finnegan, Smithville Flats, Chenango Co., '" 

L. C. Pendell, Athol, " 

Geo. Goodself, Old Forge, " 

Joe Ward, C. & A. branch, R. N. & O., Oswe- 

gatchie, 
Martin Humes, Harrisville, 
Raymond Norton, Glendale, Lewis Co., 
Frank Perkins, Greg, Lewis Co., " 

Chris. Wagner, Beaver River, " 

Chas. McKaffery, Saranac Inn, 

C. I. Stanton, Blue Mountain Lake, " 

George W. Fuller, Blue Mountain Lake, " 

Lawrence Sweeney, Lake Clear, " 

Leonard Bunting, Greenfield, Ulster Co., grouse, wood- 
cock and trout. 
Thomas Flake, Cape Vincent, pickerel, muskalonge, 

black bass. 
Wilfred Dodge, Cape Vincent, ditto 

Ren Dodge, Cape Vincent, " 

Warren Aldrich, Greenwood Lake, black bass, trout, 

grouse, squirrels, rabbits, etc. 
Charles Lane, Good Ground, L. I., ducks, geese, snipe, 

plover and salt-water fishing. 
Harry Rogers, Eastport, L. I., ditto 

Geo. Rolston, Lake Ronkonkoma, L. I., " 

Willett Ellison, Freeport, L. I., " 

W. C. Raynor, Freeport, L. I., " 

W. N. Ackerley, Patchogue, L. I., ducks, baybirds, salt- 
water fishing. 
H. Smith, Moriches, L. I., quails, woodcock and grouse. 
Dan Havens, Centre Moriches, L. L, ditto 

Hugh Smith, East Moriches, L. I., " 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Geo. Carl, Sanborn, ducks, geese, prairie chickens, snipe, 
black bass and pike. 



£ 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

Fenner S. Jarvis. Haslin P. O., deer, bear, turkeys and 

quails. 

Robert Waterfield, Knotts Island, ditto 

as. Tooly, Belleport, " 

C. Halsted, Currituck C. H., deer, turkeys, quails, 
ducks, salt-water fishing. 

Fred. Latham, Haslin, ditto 

OREGON. 

Wm. Ascher, West Fork, Douglass Co., deer, bear, elk, 

trout, grouse, ducks and geese. 
E. L. Howe, Creswell, Lane Co., ditto 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Leonard Champion, Prop'r Lehigh Valley Hotel, Mahoo- 
pany, Wyoming Co., bass, pickerel, salmon. 

VERMONT. 

E. Ward, Fair Haven, woodcock, grouse, black bass and 
trout. 

VIRGINIA. 

M. Corbel, Virginia Beach, geese, brant, ducks, shore 

birds, quails, salt-water fishing. 
Captain R. E. Miles, Machipongo, ditto 

C. A. Spencer, Buckingham, " 

M. A. Barner, Clarksville, " 

WASHINGTON. 

John S. Wood, Morton Lewis Co., deer, grouse, trout, etc. 

WISCONSIN. 

T. R. Page, Bruce, deer, grouse, trout, black bass and 

muskalonge. 
Charles Johnson, care Williams, Salsich & Co., 

Star Lake, Vilas Co., ditto 

L. L. Thomas, State Line, " 

John Thomas, State Line, " 

Chas. French, Three Lakes, " 

M. E. Monsell, Star Lake, Vilas Co., " 

H. E. Soule, South Range, " 

Judd Blaisdell, Camp Franklin, Woodruff, " 

Alexander Gillies, Camp Franklin, Woodruff, " 

C. J. Coon, Camp Franklin, Woodruff, " 

WYOMING. 

Mark H. Warner, Ten Sleep, elk, bear, deer, mountain 

sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 

Milo Burke, Ten Sleep, ditto 

James Fullerton, Ten Sleep, " 

Nelson Yarnall, Dubois, " 

Geo. Y. Hayes, Dubois, " 

S. A. Lawson, Laramie, " 

R. C. Tregoning. Laramie, " 

A. Pache, Laramie, . " 

N. E. Brown, Marquette, '' 
H. D. DeKalb, Big Piney, 

Ira Dodge, Cora, " 

S. N. Leek, Jackson, " 

W. P. Redmond, Jackson, " 

Frank L. Peterson, Jackson, " 

O. F. Bike, Jackson, " 

F. E. White, Jackson, '' 
W. A. Hague, Pleasant Valley Hotel, via Mam- 
moth Hot Springs, " 

CANADA. 
Christopher Bowers, Shelburne, Nova Scotia, moose, bear, 

grouse, black bass and trout. 
E. Thompson, Hammond Plain, Nova Scotia, ditto 
John Bowers, Shelburne, Nova Scotia, 
Billy McCoy, " 

Frank Komondo, Desert or Maniwaki, P. Q., 
Philamon Gashon. Three Lakes, P.Q., " 

Robert Elliott, Kennebec Road, Armstrong, 

County Beauce, P. Q., " 

Geo. Gillard, Little Bay, Notre Dame Bay. Newfound- 
land, caribou, bear, ptarmigan, ducks and geese. 
W. Kelly McKay, Upper Clyde. Shelburne Co., N. S., 

moose, bear, lynx, fox, partridge, rabbit, trout. 
James H. Bower. Upper Clyde, ditto 

Thomas Davis, Upper Clyde, 

Purney Davis, Upper Clyde, " 

Christian Ryer, Middle Clyde, " 

Daniel McKay, Middle Clyde, " 

Parker K. Freeman, Milton, Queens Co., N. S., moose, 

bear, lynx, fox, partridge, rabbit, trout, salmon. 
John Jeremy, Milton, ditto 

Stephen Glode, Milton, " 

Alick Michel, Milton, " 

Enoch Freeman, Greenfield, " 

Boardman Hunt, Greenfield, '* 



RECREA T10N. 



xlvii 



WHAT THEY SAY OF IT. 

Recreation is a splendid magazine, and will continue to 
find its way into many homes by reason of its truthfulness 
and its attitude toward the game hogs, that roam through 
the woods shooting game out of season. Let all honest 
sportsmen unite in bringing these disreputable swine to 
justice. 

I would prefer the acquaintance of a genuine 4-legged hog 
to that of such men. L. D. Wright, Toledo, O. 



We have been readers of Recreation since Feb. '97, and 
think it the best of its class. We have named our new boat 
Recreation, and when we camp out this summer (as we 
do every summer), we shall call the camp Recreation. We 
shoot both rifle and shot gun, and are very much pleased 
in reading the different opinions about guns and loading. 
H. M. Brown, & Henry S. Brown, Gaylordsville, Conn. 



Recreation for May is by long odds ahead of any pre- 
vious numbers. The phenomenal growth of this magazine 
must be the result of your untiring labors. I trust your suc- 
cess has but just begun. Enclosed find 10 cents for Recre- 
ation's fresh air fund. Should think all subscribers would 
promptly respond to this request. 

J. H. Ramsay, Seaboard, N. C. 



About 2 weeks ago I sent you a check for $1.10 — $1 
for renewal of my subscription to " Recreation," and 10 
cents for the fresh air fund. Up to date I have not re- 
ceived a receipt for same, and, worse than all, my copy of 
the magazine has not come to hand. You can keep the re- 
ceipt, but for Heaven's sake send the magazine. Can't keep 
house without it. T. C. Todd, Baltimore, Md. 



I thoroughly appreciate your efforts to please me in the 
matter of premiums, and thank you, gratefully, for the in- 
terest you have taken in my behalf. Accept my best wishes 
for Recreation, the best magazine published, and for its 
big hearted editor and manager. 

H. O. Matter, Harrisburg, Pa. 



Mr. H. O. Motter, 1933 No. Seventh St., says: "Rec- 
reation supplies a long felt want." 

Mr. Jacob Keough, 1501 No. Sixth St., says : " Of all the 
magazines published, in the interest of sportsmen, Recrea- 
tion is the best." C. Middaugh, Harrisburg, Pa. 



I am a crank on rifles and life in the woods, and spend 

a good deal of time with you for my companion, in the 

shape of your delightful magazine, for which I thank you, 

and the good soul, whoever he was, who gave you my name. 

W. H. Nelson, Forest Glen, Md. 



We take great pleasure in reading Recreation, as we are 
office slaves here, and can get but little time for play. We 
draw what comfort we can from reading of the exploits of 
others. Joseph Bowman, Wichita, Kan. 



Your magazine is the best I have seen yet. All my sub- 
scribers are well pleased with it. We are all waiting pa- 
tiently for the next issue, as each number excels the one 
past. H. Patterson, Wellsville, O. 



Recreation is growing in popularity. Those whom I 
have sent subscriptions for are much pleased with it, and 
are eager for the 1st of the month, so they can get Recrea- 
tion. A. L. Atkins, North Yakima, Wash. 



I am very much pleased with the magazine, and compli- 
ment you on the improvement shown in each succeeding 
number. Its influence in behalf of game protection is sure 
to be felt. J. O. Paddock, Rock Island, 111. 



Recreation is the best magazine, for sportsmen, I have 
ever seen. The illustrations in it are worth a great deal 
more than the money paid. 

A. S. Marshall, Cora, Wyo. 



I enclose $4 and the names of 4 subscribers for Recrea- 
tion. Everyone is delighted with your beautiful magazine, 
and there is no trouble in getting subscribers. 

Rev. G. D. Bayne, Pembroke, Ont. 



I am a constant reader of Recreation, and enjoy it very 
much. It is truly a sterling publication. 

Dr. F. B. Morrill, Los Angeles, Cal. 



I never undertook so easy a job as getting up a club for 
Recreation. I thought I might get 10 names, but 1 now 
have 43. Our sportsmen are delighted with the magazine. 
Rev. G. D. Bayne, Pembroke, Ont. 



I find Recreation improving with age. I admire the 
stand you take, in regard to the game hogs, and the pro- 
tection of all kinds of game. May success crown your 
efforts. A. L. Gutheil, Winchester, Ind. 

Nearly every sportsman, when shown a copy of Recrea- 
tion, says " Yes, put my name down. Here's a dollar." I 
find it is no work at all to get the subscribers. 

Thomas Perry, Jr., Middletown, N. Y. 



Recreation is by far the best sportsman's magazine I 
ever read. I wish it were published weekly, instead of 
monthly. It is filling a long felt want. 

R. C. Fisk, Helena, Mont. 



Your magazine grows more interesting, from month to 
month. Roast the butchers. 

L. D. von Iffland, Cowansville, P. Q. 



Take the world but give me Recreation. All other joys 
are but a sham compared with this magazine. 

Clarence Soule, Marengo, Mich. 



Scarcely a day passes but that I hear some one put in a 
good word for Recreation. 

Lloyd Jones, Marshfield, Wis. 



Enclosed find $1 to renew my subscription. Can't do 
without Recreation. Best book out. 

B. E. Campbell, Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

I like Recreation, very much, and appreciate the 
courteous treatment I have received from the publisher. 
L. H. Dodge, Cape Vincent, N. Y. 



Of all sportsmen's magazines I have ever seen, Recrea- 
tion is the handsomest, most interesting, and instructive. 
Oran R. Akers, Sherman, Tex. 



Recreation the best sportsman's journal published. I 
read several sportsmen's papers, but find none so interesting 
as Recreation. > H. C. Kurtasch, North Hudson, Wis. 



I am delighted with Recreation, for it fills the bill. Any- 
one who would wish more for $1 must be classified with 
the game hogs. Ferdinand Beck, Virginia City, Nev. 



I could not take a vacation that I would enjoy more, or one 
that would cost less, than to peruse each issue of Recrea- 
tion. J. G. Tobey, Portsmouth, N. H. 



My father takes other sportsmen's papers but always 
wants to see mine first. He thinks Recreation the best. 

C. H. Smith, N. Y. City. 



I like your magazine better than any of the 25 cent ones. 
Alan H. Stevens, Detroit, Mich. 



Recreation is the brightest and cleanest thing of its 
kind I know of. E. F. McLean, Newburyport, Mass. 



Recreation is the best magazine of its kind I have seen. 
Horatio F. Nichols, Boston, Mass. 



All who see and read Recreation are delighted with it. 
L. C. Trout, Staunton, Ind. 



Recreation is the best magazine out, at any price. 

Lester Martin, Lewiston, Idaho. 



You publish the most interesting magazine of its class. 
C. H. Calkins, Daisy, Tenn. 



Recreation the best magazine on earth. 

J. E. Meeker, Chanute, Kan. 



Recreation is a peach. G. Morton, Augusta, Me. 



xlviii 



RECREA TION. 



A Practical Common Sense Camp Stove. 

In 6 Sizes. Patent applied for. 

The lightest, most com- 
pact, practical camp 
stove made; either with 
or without oven. Won't 
get out of shape, com- 
bination cast and sheet 
steel top, smooth body, 
heavy lining, telescopic 
pipe carried inside the 
stove. 

Burns largest wood, keeps fire longest of any 
stove made. For full particulars address 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, I1L 




Dixon's Graphitoleo 

Lubricates not only the chain and sprockets, but 
also the pins in the links of the chain, 

which stick Graphite cannot do and is not intended 
to do. For gun locks, for copying presses, and 
for office chairs it is unequaled. If your dealer 
does not keep it, mention Recreation, and send 
15 cents for sample. 

JOS. DIXON CRUCIBLE CO., Jersey City, N. J. 

WANTED.— LIVE ELK, MOOSE, CARIBOU, BLACK- 
tail deer, wild turkey, European roebucks, fallow deer, 
etc., for Litchfield Park, Adirondacks. Address, with par- 
ticulars, EDWARD H. LITCHFIELD, 59 Wall Street, New 
York. 




If You Carry a Gun 

CROUCH & FITZGERALD, 

Make Reliable Work Only 

i6i Broadway 723 6th Avenue 6&8 Broadway 



NEW 
YORK 




OPTICIANS. 

21 flpn Square ,H. I 

The Telescopes furnished 
by you to the Signal Corps, 
National Guard, State of 
New York, I find remark 
able for definition and clear- 
ness of objects at long dis 
tances. Yours, etc., 



HOMER W. HEDGE, 

ist Lieut, and 
Ass't Signal Officer. 




IN ANSWERING ADS, IF YOU 
WILL KINDLY MENTION REC- 
REATION YOU WILL GREATLY 
OBLIGE THE EDITOR. 



G. CRAMER 

DRY PLATE 
WORKS 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Full descriptive catalogue mailed 
to any address on application 

5 5 



CHESTNUTS. 

" Wheel riding, they say', impairs danc- 
ing ability." 

"That's not so; I got a bicycle, and it 
has kept me hopping to pay for it." 



" Highgear and his wife are to re- 
marry." 

"What brought them together again?" 
" They met accidentally, somewhere, and 
discovered that they rode the same make 
of wheel." 



" Elizabeth seems to have gone heart and 
soul into this bird-protective movement." 

"Yes; and now she is getting up an 
organization to oppose the slaughtering of 
those cunning little billy-goats, to make 
our kid gloves." 



" New York has its own theory about 
the air ship." 

"What is it?" 

" They say that bright light is some last 
year's Philadelphia sunsets just getting in." 



" Play helps work," the savant writes — 
'Tis a false tip he indites: 
If we do not work — I say — 
How get cash to pay for play? 



" Did you read about that man who 
traded his wife for a shot gun? " 

" Yes — lots of men do that; but you 
don't see many items about men trading 
their shot guns for wives." 



"Jimmy, what is a planked shad? " 
"I dunno; mebbe they has ter hit 'em 
with a plank to ketch 'em." 



R /'CREATION. 



xlix 



E^v^ 






ill 






^L 



A 



A 



W 



/^ Have you 

ever noticed the numerous 
testimonials of the 

Bristol Steel Rod 

That appear each month in the reading col- \\ 

umns of RECREATION ? \\ 

Well, these come from disinterested people ; 

from people who are 

Practical Anglers and who are 

Anal T T -jn~ Our Rods.// 
ah who use BRISTOL RODS 

Speak in the most glowing; terms of them, f/ 
Try one and you will do likewise. 

Send for a catalogue. It tells about them. 

THE HORTON MFG. CO. S 

BRISTOL, CONN. 



RECREA TION: 



Savage Rifles for Savage Game 




One Savage Rifle 




SCHUETZEN TARGET RANGES 



takes all 
these 
different 
cartridges 
without any 
change or 



aw* adjustment §m 

M 

CATALOGUE ON 

LONG RANGE TARGETS APPLICATION SHORT RANGE USE 



;iA*- v^MOK^pF?SS 




HOME OFFICE 

SAVAGE REPEATING ARMS CO. 

Utica, N. Y. 



PACIFIC COAST AGENCY 

BAKER & HAMILTON 

San Francisco, Cal. 



New Ithaca 



Self compensating, 
taking up wear 
at every point 





Bored 

FOR BLACK AND 
NITRO POWDERS 



Price but a little more than one-naif that of any other good gun, and 
warranted in the most positive terms, shooting included 






ITHACA GUN COMPANY, ITHACA, N. Y. | 



Send for circular 

Mention Recreation 



Manufacturers of fine Hammer 
and Hammerless Guns 










RECREATION. li 

T7_ t. QT\ V/»-.fc. 4.u • V^k has been identified with 

ror nearly OU Y ears the name V£ **» 

^/^!&r *^ e manufacture of 

l/lMllillllllilllllllil lllllll ~ ^ **©*tflA* 

i 

m 

.HODEL 1894. ^iBb 

AUTOMATIC EJECTOR 

Our present line is complete and varied and shows the result of years of experience. 

For catalogues and information address 

THE W. H. DAVENPORT FIRE ARMS CO. 

Men tion ■■ k.ob.W NORWICH, CONN.. U. 5. A. 

Rector Gnns ^g,^ fiOO(J HCW$ for St>OI*t$ltiett 

no longer a <0t Hi * ivVM ■*»w* ivi vyvi iohivii 

^^^ ljj|l|§iipP^^ Lefever Automatic Ejector Guns at a price 

lUXIiry ^s^iPi^ ^P^^ within the reach of every sportsman. 

OUR NEW EJECTOR HOVEHENT 

Has only two pieces: One in the 
Hammer, One in 
the Frame. 

lisffi^I^y^ Jgj We have decided to meet 

the demand for medium 
price Ejectors, and are now 
prepared to accept orders 
for all grades of our ham- 
OF THOUSANDS TN USB '^^^^^^ meriess^ guns fitted with 

Send for Catalogue ^gpp^ ^^ 

LEFEVER ARMS CO. - - Syracuse, N. Y. 

(Mention Recreation.) 

Date, 1897. 

Q. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 19 West 24th St., New York: 
Herewith find One Dollar, for which please send me RECREATION 
for one year beginning with number. 

Name, „ 

Remit by P. 0. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT, AND SEND IN. 




lii 



RECREA TION. 



A FINE PERFORMANCE 

GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP, 189f 




1st— Hon. T. A. MARSHALL, 
Keithsbur gf, 111., 25 kills straight* 

2d— Dr* W* F. CARVER, Chicago, 
24 straight, and 25th killed but 
carried out of bounds by wind* 

2d— Dr* J* L* WILLIAMSON, 24 
ex* 25* 



All 

Using 

Cashmore 

Guns 



FIRST AND TW O SECONDS OUT OF 136 COMPETITORS 

TRAP GUN BUILDING A SPECIALTY 
new list free Address, WM. CASHMORE, Qunmaker 

Telegram, "Extractor, Birmingham'* BIRMINGHAM, ENG. 




FOR FIELD OR FOR TRAP, 
FOR POT HUNTING OR FUN, 
NO SPORTSMAN IS EQUIPPED 
WITHOUT A SYRACUSE GUN 



V'MORE TRUTH 
) THAN POETRY" 




we do not say that SYRACUSE HAMMERLESS GUNS 

Good" as any gun in the market* 




Their simplicity of construction and superiority of finish stamp them * BETTER" for 
practical 'all-round work than any gun in the market. The "old, old story" but, 
nevertheless* substantiated by every man who ever drew a Syracuse to his shoulder. 



m\ 



SYRACUSE ARMS CO, SYRACUSE, N. Y„ U. S. A. 






RECREA TION. 



[in 



Forehand Arms Co/s 



EJECTOR AND NON-EJECTOR 

HAMMERLESS DOUBLE GUN 




LATEST MODEL 



READ WHAT MEN 
SAY OF THE 
FOREHAND, WHO 
ARE USING IT. 



Warren, III. 

The Forehand Hammerless Gun you sent me, for 35 
subscriptions, has arrived. I am delighted with it, and 
shall recommend it highly. It is a good, close-shooting 
gun, simple in action, and of fine workmanship. I made 
two long shots with it yesterday at grouse in heavy brush, 
killing both birds at distances of forty to forty-five yards. 
I would not wish for a better gun than the Forehand for 
trap shooting. Dr . A . C. Czibulka. 



WE GET THOUSANDS 
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was enough. I comparea my gun with an $85.00 gun to- 
day, of another make, and mine gained in value greatly, 
in my estimation. w B Kent> 



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|HOW IT HAPPENED. 

La Fayette, Ind. 

Editor Recreation: In a recent num- 
ber of Recreation " Tamarack " told 
about 2 of his party getting lost. We deny 
it. It is true we got mixed on distance and 
did some extra walking; but we had no 
trouble in finding the place we started 
from. 

There is no question as to the number 
of trout Tamarack and his partners caught; 
but their methods were questionable. On 
leaving camp that morning they were re- 
solved to bring in more fish than we. After 
leaving us, they started down stream. 

Separating, they fished, with fair luck. 
An hour later, Tamarack, working his way 
down the middle of the stream, was almost 
paralyzed by an unearthly scream, followed 
by a crashing of timber. Before he could 
recover, Chickaree rushed up to the bank, 
his hat off, coat torn, rod gone. 

" Climb a tree, quick," he could just 
stammer out. " The biggest bear I ever 
saw is after me," he panted. 

With one bound Tamarack was on the 
bank; an instant later he was looking down 
from a safe retreat in the fork of a birch 
tree. Chickaree was only a second behind 
him; but where was the cook? Chickaree 
was sure the bear had him; but Tamarack 



thought the fellow too tough for an or- 
dinary bear. 

When the branches of the birch began 
to grow tiresome to the fishermen, they 
thought to inquire into the fate of the cook. 
A few war-whoops were answered from the 
distance, followed by the cook, who was 
surprised to see them up a tree. When 
asked what they were doing, they said they 
climbed the tree to look for him. 

After finding Chickaree's hat and rod, 
still being timid about bears, one of them 
asked the cook if he had seen any. No 
bear, he assured them, but he did see a 
mighty big porcupine. Tamarack looked 
at Chickaree and Chick looked at Tarn. 
Then they bound the cook to everlasting 
silence; but it leaked out. 

How they caught more fish than we, is 
the question. It was only what might be 
expected of them. They whipped the 
stream unsuccessfully, for a time, finishing 
their efforts at a pool fairly alive with trout, 
but not one could they coax out of the 
wet. So the bold fishermen bound to- 
gether brush and twigs, making a seine that 
reached across the pool. With this fiendish 
machine they hauled in everything, picked 
out what they wanted and threw the rest 
back. Then Tarn and Chick smiled at each 
other, as they said, " We have them." 

Loon. 



Ivi 



RECREA TION: 



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What's 
the Use 

of walking when you 
can get a first-class, high- 
grade bicycle for nothing? 

How? 

By getting 75 subscriptions for 

Recreation 

If you live in a town of 3 t 000 
or more, and if you are a hustler 
you can get these in 2 days. 

I can give, you the names of 20 
people who did this in J 896, and 
who now have their wheels. 

Write for particulars. 

RECREATION 

19 West 24th Street 
New York 




Two of the best revolvers made in the 
United States, are advertised in this issue 
of Recreation. There are 2 other con- 
cerns in the country, both of which claim 
to make " the best " revolvers, but they re- 
fuse to recognize the readers of Recrea- 
tion as being capable of appreciating their 
kind of " best " goods. Men who approve 
the course of this magazine and who de- 
sire to see it grow in usefulness, will serve 
their own interests by patronizing the 
houses that advertise in Recreation. 



Fishing is good here. There is a party 
at the hotel, on the carry, and another at 
the Seloomoc Cottage. They are getting 
all the fish they want. I am traveling most 
of the time. I hunt bear until some time 
in June, each year, and do not engage in 
the spring fishing. 

I see lots of game, on my tramps. Saw 
5 moose, recently, and deer are abundant. 

John H. Quilty, Moosehead Lake, Me. 



Isaac Gage, of Hawleyton, N. Y., boasts 
of having killed over 30a ruffed grouse, last 
fall, in that vicinity and Brackneyville, Pa., 
which is near Hawleyton. Why not give 
him a roast? 

E. W. F., Binghamtdn, N. Y. 

I hope Mr. Satan will attend to that, 
when Mr. Gage quits this earth. 

Editor. 



BOOKS 



By 



C. O. SHIELDS 

(coquina) 



THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA 

Its Habits, Habitat, Haunts and Characteristics. 
How, When and Where to Hunt it. 8vo, 600 
pages, 80 illustrations. Cloth, $350 ; Half Mor- 
occo, $5.00 ; Full Morocco, $6.50. 
CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES 

A Narrative of Travel, Exploration, Amateur 
Photography, Hunting and Fishing, with Special 
Chapters on Hunting the Grizzly Bear, the Buf- 
falo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and 
Deer ; also on Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ; 
on a Montana Roundup ; Life Among the Cow- 
boys, etc. i2mo, 300 pages, 75 illustrations. Cloth, 
$2 ; Half Morocco, $3. 

AMERICAN GAME FISHES 

How, When and Where to Angle for them. 8vo, 
400 pages, 50 illustrations. Cloth, $2.50; Half Mor- 
occo, $4. 

HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST 

(Rustlings in the Rockies) 
Hunting and Fishing Sketches by Mountain and 
Stream. i2mo, cloth. Over 300 pages. Illustrated. 
Price, 75 cents. 

THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG 

The Origin, Development, Special Characteristics, 
Utility, Breeding, Training, Diseases and Kennel 
Management of all Breeds of Dogs. 8vo, 650 pages, 
100 illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5 ; 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 

CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS 

A Manual of Instruction for Young and Old Sports- 
men. i2mo, 200 p^ges, 30 illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 

THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE 

History of General Gibbon's Engagement with 
the Nez Perce Indians in the Big Hole Basin, Mon- 
tana, August 9, 1877. i2mo, 150 pages. Profusely 
illustrated. Cloth, $1. 
These books will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt 

of price, by the author. 

Q. O. SHIELDS 

19 West 24th St., New York 



Iviii 



RECREA TION, 



fefefe 




These goods are all new, and 
will be shipped direct from factory. 
Prices named are those at which 
manufacturers and dealers usually 
sell. Here is a good chance to gtt 

A BOOK 
A GUN 
A CAMERA 
A TYPEWRITER 
A BICYCLE 

FREE OF COST^.^ 

¥ 

Subscriptions need not all be 
sent at once. They can be sent in 
installments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. When the 
required number is obtained the 
premium earned will be shipped. 



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Recreation 



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\9 West 24th Street 
New York 



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To any person sending me 

TWO yearly subscriptions to Recreation at 
$i each, I will send a copy of Hunting in 
the Great West, paper. 

THREE subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
The Battle of the Big Hole, cloth. 

FOUR subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
Camping and Camping Outfits, cloth. 

FIVE subscriptions at $i each, a copy of 
Cruising in the Cascades, cloth ; or a Will- 
sie Pocket Camera, valued at $5. It makes 
a picture 2^x2f inches and can be loaded 
with 24 cut films. 

SIX subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
A?nerican Game Fishes, cloth. 

SEVEN subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Big Ga??ie of North Ajnerica, or of 
The American Book of the Dog, cloth. 

EIGHT subscriptions at $1 each, a Pocket 
Kodak, made by the Eastman Kodak Co., 
and valued at $5. 

TEN subscriptions at $1 each, a single-shot 
Davenport Rifle ; or a Bristol Steel Fish- 
ing rod, or a Yawman and Erbe Auto- 
matic Reel, worth $9 ; or a Kenwood 
Sleeping Bag, worth $10 ; or a No. 10 
Gramophone, worth $10. 

TWELVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Manhat- 
tan Improved Hand Camera, made by the 
Manhattan Optical Co., and valued at $12. 

FIFTEEN subscriptions at $1 each, a Dav- 
enport Single-barrel, breech-loading Shot- 
gun, worth $15 ; or a Premo D Camera, 
worth $6 to $10 ; or a Kenwood Sleeping 
Bag, complete with canvas cover, worth 
$16 ; or a No. 2 Bullet Camera, loaded, 
worth $10. 

TWENTY subscriptions at $1 each, a 14- 
karat Gold Hunting-case Watch, with 
Elgin Movement, worth $20 ; or a Marlin 
Repeating Rifle, listed at $20 ; or an Im- 
proved Night-hawk Hand Camera, made 
by the Manhattan Optical Co., and valued 
at $25 ; or a No. 4 Bullseye Camera, made 
by the Eastman Kodak Co., and worth 
$12 ; or a Premo B Camera, worth $16. 

TWENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
No. 4 Bullet Camera, made by the East- 
man Kodak Co., and worth $18 ; or a 
Gramophone, valued at $25. 

THIRTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Forehand or a Syracuse Double-barrel 
Hammerless Breech-loading Shot-gun, 
worth $35; or a Premo A Camera, worth $25 

FORTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Premo 
Sr. Camera, worth $30. 

FIFTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Marlin 
Rifle, with fancy curled walnut stock, 
pistol grip, checkered four-end, hand- 
somely engraved, half octagon, half 
magazine, with take down, listed at $50. 

SEVENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Safety Bicycle, worth $85 to $100 ; or a Bo- 
peep Camera, for 5x7 plates, made by the 
Manhattan Optical Co., and valued at $90. 

EIGHTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Premo 
Sr. Camera, worth $65. 

ONE HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, 
a fine Lefever Hammerless Gun, worth 
$85 ; or a Bo-peep Camera, for 6$x8£ 
plates, made by the Manhattan Optical 
Co., and valued at $120. 



RECREA TTON. 



lix 



"THE LITTLE FINGER DOES IT" 

The Fisherman's Automatic Reel 



THE 





What we claim for 
the Automatic Reel 



First — It will wind up the 
line a hundred times as 
fast as any other reel in 
the world. 

Second. — It will wind up 
the line slowly if the 
angler chooses. 

Third — No fish can ever 
get slack line with it. 

Four til — It will save 
more fish than any other 
reel. 

Fifth — It will prevent 
tips, lines, and snells 
from being broken by 
large fish. 

Sixth — The reel is ma- 
nipulated entirely by the 
hand that holds the rod. 



FOR 



Seventh — It enables the 
angler and makes it de- 
sirable to use lighter tips. 



> 




lx 



RECREA TION. 



The Big Game 

North America 




ITS HABITS, HABITAT, HAUNTS, AND CHARACTERISTICS 
HOW, WHEN, AND WHERE TO HUNT IT 

A Book for the Sportsman and the Naturalist 



EDITED BY 



G, O. SHIELDS ("COQUINA") 



AUTHOR OF " CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES," "RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES," "HUNTING IN THE GREAT 
WEST," "THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE," " CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS," ETC. 



8vo, 600 Pages, 80 Illustrations. 

Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Calf, $5,00; Full Morocco, $6.50. 

CONTENTS 



Introduction. By the Honorable John Dean Caton, 

author of " The Antelope and Deer of America," etc. 
Moose Hunting in the Rocky Mountains. Newton 

Hibbs (" Roxey Newton "). 
Elk Hunting in the Olympic Mountains. W. A. Perry 

(" Sillalicum "). 
The Wapiti (Poem). By " Wah-bah-mi-mi." 
The Caribou. By William P. Lett ("Algonquin") 

and Dr. R. B. Cantrell. 
The Mule Deer. Rev. Joshua Cooke (" Boone"). 
The Mule Deer of Southern California. T. S. Van 

Dyke, author of" The Still Hunter," etc. 
The Columbia Black-tail Deer. Thomas G. Farrell. 
The Virginia Deer. Walter M. Wolfe (" Shoshone "). 
A Deer Hunt (Poem). " Wah-bah-mi-mi." 
Hunting the Grizzly Bear. Rev. Dr. W. S. Rainsford. 
The Polar Bear. Sergt. Francis Long, of the Greely 

Arctic Expedition, and George S. McTavish, of the 

Hudson Bay Company. 
A Polar Bear Hunt. 

The Black Bear. Col. Geo. D. Alexander. 
The Buffalo. Orin Belknap (" Uncle Fuller "). 



The Musk Ox. "Sergt. H. Bierdebick, of the Greely 
Arctic Expedition. 

Still-hunting the Antelope. Arthur W- du Bray 
(" Gaucho "). 

Coursing the Antelope. M. E. Allison. 

The Death of Venus (Poem). Wm. P. Lett. 

The Rocky Mountain Goat. John Fannin. 

The Rocky Mountain Sheep. G. O. Shields (" Coqui- 
na "). 

The Peccary. A. G. Requa. 

The Cougar, or Mountain Lion. W. A. Perry (" Silla- 
licum "). 

The Lynx. J. C. Nattrass. 

The Wild Cat. Daniel Arrowsmith (" Sangamon "). 

The Wolf. Wm. P. Lett. 

The Wolverine. C. A. Cooper (" Sibyllene "). 

Coon Hunting in Southern Illinois. Daniel Arrow- 
smith (" Sangamon "). 

Fox Hunting in Virginia. Dr. M. G. Ellzey. 

Alligator Shooting in Florida. Cyrus W. Butler. 

The Ethics of Field Sports. Wm. B. Leffingwell. 



The Hon. John Dean Caton, the eminent naturalist and jurist, author of "The Antelope and Deer of 
America," etc., says of this work : 

" Altogether, there is given here such a study of the natural history of our game quadrupeds, and of the 
thrilling incidents encountered in hunting them, as has never before been offered to the reading world. Each 
chapter in this book is in itself a complete work, and the book, as a whole, is a most valuable library. 

" Any one of the names on Mr. Shields' list of contributors should insure the sale of an entire edition of 
his book, and when we multiply this possibility by twenty-six, the whole number of names on his title-page, 
the result obtained indicates the magnitude of the success that should, and that we hope will, crown his labors 
and those of his collaborateurs." 

"This sumptuous volume, profusely and elegantly illustrated, written by a score or more of sportsmen, is a 
very captivating book. No single writer could have had all the experiences here narrated. The descriptions 
and incidents cover every variety of large game on the continent. ***** The stories are as excellent in 
their variety as in their quality. There are no dull chapters in the book. In fact, it may be said it is the finest 
collection of hunting stories ever published." — Chicago Inter-Ocean. 

" This is one of the best and most valuable of the books as yet written or edited by Mr. Shields. It com- 
prises a collection of intelligently written monographs on all the various kinds of big game to be found in 
North America, from the grizzly to the polar bear, and from the Virginia deer to the Rocky Mountain goat. 
Each writer speaks from his own experience, tells what he has done and seen, and recounts the often thrilling 
incidents he has met with in hunting. All the contributors to the volume are well-known writers on field sports 
and hunting, and each one writes of a species of game he has studied for years in the field, on the mountain, or 
in the forest." 

" The paper on the Rocky Mountain sheep is by the Editor, and is a fine account of the wildest, wariest, 
and most difficult animal to hunt on the continent. Mr. Shields is a most enthusiastic sportsman, and more- 
over, wields the pen of a ready writer, as indeed all these sportsmen do, so that One follows him in his adven- 
tures with almost breathless interest. 

" From beginning to end and in every chapter this book is positively fascinating." — Chicago Herald. 



This book will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price by the editor. 

G. O. SHIELDS, J9 West 24th Street, New York 
Also given as a Premium for 7 Subscriptions to Recreation 



51 



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June 15th. Mr. E., an ''influential" 

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Mr. B. has profited at the expense 
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NUMBER 3 



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RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1896, by G. O. Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



$1.00 a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Edilor and Manager. 



19 West 24TH Street, 

New York. 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 



" Therefore I Jumped it. ' '—Frontispiece Bert Cassidy 

How They Didn't Hit Him in the Eye J. B.Jennett 

" When Diana Gets Her Gun. " (Poem) Illustrated Stern Rakoff 

Work of the Swine. Illustrated J. D. P. 

An Autumn Horseback Trip. Illustrated *. J. F. Gordon 

The Opening of the Season R. B. Buckham 

A Cycle Race, with a Sequel Miss C. H. Thayer 

The Music of the Woods. (Poem) J. D. Crawford, Jr. 

Echoes in the Moonlight. (Poem) Marguerite Tracy 

A Yale-Princeton Football Game Courtland Nixon 

Ruffed Grouse and Woodcock U. B. 

Our Alaskan Exploring Expedition. Canoeing on the Stickeen. Illustrated A.J.Stone 

Catching a Tartar Capt. J. G. Leefe, U.S.A. 

A Canoe Trip to Rainy Lake Harry Silver 

The King of the Gaulies Mark T. Leonard 

Elkland. Illustrated Ernest Seton Thompson 

The Bear, the Belle, and the Blackberries Frances Webster 

A Boating Song (Poem) E. W. Mason 

How We Photoff.aphed the Wild Cat Coyote Bill 

The Wolf Question ... R. M. Allen, R. Ashworth, and Dr. Frank Dunham 

The Broadway Cable Sings. (Poem) Marguerite Tracy 

My Recreation. (Pcem) Hon. S. B. McManus 

From the Game Fields 

Fish and Fishing 

Guns and Ammunition 

Natural History 

Editor's Corner 



211 
224 
229 
233 
238 



Bicycling 

Game Notes 

Amateur Pnotography. . . 
Publisher ' s Department . 



Page 

171 
174 
175 
176 
179 
182 
183 
185 
186 
« 189 
190 
192 

195 
197 
199 
202 
204 
205 
207 
210 
232 
241 
245 
247 
250 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, it 









1#« 

sozodon: 




FOR THE 



Hall & Rick el 



YOU have confidence in things which 
have stood a real test of years? 
Then you must have faith in 

S ozodbnf 



With our grandparents it was the 
favorite family dentifrice. To-day it 
is no less a favorite. Back of this 
there must be reasons. What they 
are you can best determine by a trial 
of this famous dentifrice. 

A sample for three cents (postage) if you mention 
this publication. Address the Proprietors of Sozodont, 
Messrs. Hall &. Ruckel, New York. 



1557 




1597 



01 
01 



7^ 




11 



RECREATION. 



■:.;:;■ "''... - 



%ide ajVloaarch aad kefep ii\ front? 




CHICAGO, 



NEW XORK, 

SEND FOR 40 PAGE ART CATALOGUE 



RECREA TION. 



111 




cK 




The "Bristol" Lectures 

Every angler knows what " backbone " means — as applied to 
a fishing rod — the power to withstand a severe strain, and recover 
from it. It is safe to assert there was never a wooden rod made 
that would not take a " set " — making it an eyesore, and rendering 
it entirely unfit for casting. 

THE BRISTOL STEEL FISHING RODS 

are equal to any strain, and always return to the same straight form 
as when new. The "Bristol" is made in 17 different styles and 
sizes — weighing 6% to \\}4 oz — and the reduction in prices for '97 
(owing to improved facilities) brings the " Bristol " within the grasp 
of any man who knows what a rod should be. 

Send for Catalogue " R" to 

The Horton Manufacturing Company 

BRISTOL, CONN. 





IV 



R EC RE A TION. 



f 






\ 



* 



THE REPEATER WITH THE SOLID TOP 



The Marlin Model 1897 




ISA 



22 CALIBRE 
TAKE DOWN 



Model 1897 Rifle Apart 




This uses in one rifle the 22 short, 22 long and 
22 long rifle cartridges, black and smokeless 

We have endeavored to make this the best 22 calibre 
rifle ever made, and it is* 

Weight only 5 1=2 pounds 
Action finely finished inside and outside 



The Receiver is made of our u Special Smokeless 
Steel/' same as used in our Smokeless Rifles* 
The working parts are of tool steeL This insures a perfect working; 
rifle and a permanent adjustment* 

Barrel gracefully tapered, with elevating rear, and German silver 

for sights. 
Easy to clean. No single shot can be more conveniently cleaned. 

Simplest to take apart. 

Send • for • Catalogue 

THE MARLIN FIRE ARMS CO. 

.New Haven, Conn. 






RECREA TION. 



The Model \ 893 



is the rifle using the 30-30 Smokeless Cartridge. This cartridge 
as made for our rifle is loaded with 32 grains of Military 
Smokeless Powder, giving a velocity of 2,000 feet per second, 
a full 2,000, not \ 00 or so less* This, with our flat pointed 
bullet, makes as accurate a 30 calibre cartridge as can be loaded, 
and also one without a superior for hunting purposes. 






THESE ARE THE FACTORY CARTRIDGES 




Full Metal Cased Bullet 

(For Target Purposes) 



Soft Pointed Bullet 

(For Hunting Use) 



mr ■ ^r^oronrE^sr 



Six grains of 
smokeless pow- 
der ioo-grain 
bullet 



W/ SHORT RANGE 



For Short Ranges 



The Barrel and Action of this rifle are made of our 

Special Smokeless Steel 

guaranteed to stand the highest pressure. We also use this steel in all 
the rest of our Model J893 Rifles, viz., 25-36 Smokeless, 32-40 and 38-55, 
and also in the Model J 895 taking the 38-56, 40 and 45 calibre cart- 
ridges* We are determined to have our rifles just as strong and safe 
as good material can make an arm. 

Our new catalogue is a veritable encyclopaedia of information 
regarding rifles, ammunition, etc. Free for the asking, but stamps will 
help pay postage. 

THE MARLIN FIRE ARMS CO. 

.New Haven, Conn. 



i 



I 



mm***************************************** 



VI 



RECREA TION. 






Mullins' 

"Get There" Safety 

Ducking Boat 

Fitted with grass blinds, making the 
most practical, durable, and seaworthy 
boat you can buy* 

LOW IN COST. . . 

Always ready for use* 

After a trial trip you will use no other. 

Send for Catalogue 

W, H. MULLINS, 228 Depot Street 

SALEM, OHIO 




~%&\ 




RECKEA 770 X. 



VI 1 



The Megaphone 




A NOVEL DEVICE 
FOR TALKING 
AT A DISTANCE 



Will carry the voice distinctly two miles* Is used 
with great success by announcers at Athletic Meets, 
Fairs, etc* Is of great value at seashore and mountains. 
It is strongly made and there's nothing to get out of order* 



48 in. $5.00 



PRICES AS FOLLOWS 
36 in. $4.00 

Sent C. O. D. or on receipt of price 



30 in. $3.50 



HARVEY & LEWIS, Opticians, Hartford, Conn. 




I You Cannot Brag! 

about your cycling achievements unless a . ♦ ♦ * * 




The Veeder has banished all other forms of 5 
Cyclometer, and its success has aroused imitations Z 
that resemble it only in * 
appearance. Be sure your | 
purchase bears the name * 
that assures perfection — 5 
VEEDER. i 

DUST-PROOF. 
WATER-PROOF. ? 

POSITIVELY 5 

ACCURATE. 

AT ALL DEALERS. f 

Booklet Free, ^ 

* 

1 VEEDER MFG. CO., Hartford, Conn \ 

******** a*************** ******** ******** ******** ******** ******** 





A GREAT OFFER by 

GERMANIA WINE 
CELLARS 

HAMMONDSPORT and 
RHEIMS, N. Y. 

In order to introduce our goods we 
make the following' offer, good for the 
next thirty days only. Upon receipt of 
$5.00 we will send to any sportsman or 
reader of RECREATION one case of our 
goods containing eleven bottles of wine 
and one bottle of our extra fine double- 
distilled Grape Brandy, all first class 
and put up in elegant style, assorted, as 
follows : 

1 Quart Bottle Grand Imperial 

See Champagne 
1 Quart Bottle Delaware 
1 •' " Riesling 

1 " " Tokay 

1 " " Sweet Catawba 

1 " " Sherry 

1 " " Elvira 

1 •' " Niagara 

1 " " Angelica 

1 " " Port 

1 « " Sweet Isabella 

1 " " Imperial Grape 

Brandy 

This offer is made mainly 
to introduce our Grand Im- 
perial Sec Champagne and 
our fine double-distilled 
Grape Brandy, without 
which no Sportsman or 
Hunter should start on an 
expedition, as it is very 
necessary where such exer- 
cise is taken. This case of 
goods is offered at about 
one-half its actual cost and 
it will please us if our 
friends and patrons will 
take advantage of this and 
help us introduceour goods. 



VI 11 



RECREA TION. 




RECREATION'S GRIZZLY BEAR COMPETITION. 

ist. The bear walked slowly by, at 25 
yards. He was unconscious of my pres- 
ence. I fired; he ran 50 yards and fell 
dead. 

Where did I hit him? 

2d. He walked slowly by, at 25 yards. 
I fired and he fell dead in his tracks. 

Where did I hit him? 

3d. He walked rapidly by, at 25 yards. 
I fired hurriedly, as he disappeared behind 
a rock. I took up the trail and found 
blood at every jump. I followed him 2 
miles, but the blood finally ceased to flow. 
I lost the trail and never saw him again. 

Where did I hit him? 

These 3 shots are recorded on a copy of 
the above drawing, on file in this office, 
the location of each being shown by a 
black spot indicating the place where the 
ball entered. A yearly subscription to 
Recreation will be given each person who 
will locate each of the 3 shots correctly. 

Cut out the drawing, mark each shot by 
an X, followed by the number of shot, as 
X 1, X 2, X 3. Write your name and ad- 
dress on margin, and send in. 

A number of the best solutions will be 
published, in November or December Rec- 
reation together with the office drawing, 
showing the shots as already located. 

Note 1. — Each bullet went through the 
bear, passing out exactly opposite the point 
at which it entered. 

Note 2. — The rulings of the editor, and 
the location of the supposed shots must be, 
in a measure, arbitrary; yet they are based 
on a wide range of experience and on 
anatomical science. 




uhderuleari 



Soft and velvety to the most sensitive skin 
The best safeguard to health in our climate 
For Men, Women and Children 
The perfected result of years of experience 

( Write for illustrated booklet. 

ROOT MFG. CO., 1 Greene St., NEW YORK 

<ppW l .lWt» ' f;, ' 9, < > ' ?. "J ' > . ... ,!P,,,W '! HP[" l , ' ,"iH" I P I . ■ .»" ■ ," ■ :■ .;■ 1. . — — — — 




■ .ROOTS 
TIVOLI ' 

STANDARD'*' 
UNDERWEAR 



Underuiear 





Recreation is the best magazine I ever read. 

William Dasker, Robinsonburg, Quebec, Can. 



Recreation takes no steps backward. 

James M. Graves, Potsdam, N. Y. 



RECREA riON. 



IX 



GAS ENGINE & POWER CO. 

"S-CHARLES L. SEABURY & CO.. a«iider. .■ 




The 



Only Naphtha 
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High-class Steam Yachts, Sail Yachts, Electric 
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promptly done* Charters and Insurance* Boats bought and 
sold on commission ♦ . 



CORRESPONDENCE 
SOLICITED .... 



Send ten cents in stamps for catalogues* to downtown office* 
50 BROADWAY, or to factory at 



MORRIS HEIGHTS, New York City 



RECREA Tl 'ON. 



"One of the hits of the season." " A rattling good story." 

— Ne<w York Commercial Advertiser — Boston Herald 

44 Delightful, without any mental reservations." 

— Ne<zv York Home Journal 

¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 

THE MAN WHO BECAME 
~~~~A SAVAGE—— 

A Story of Our Own Times, Our Own Country, and Borneo 

BY WILLIAM T. HORNADAY 

Author of 
"Two Years in the Jungle," "Taxidermy and Zoological Collecting," etc. 

With J 6 Half -Tone Illustrations by Chas. B. Hudson 

A handsome crown octavo volume, 413 pp. beautifully printed, bound in full 
cloth with attractive side-stamp, in olive, gold and brown. Price, postpaid, $1.50 

¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 

This book will please readers of RECREATION because it is a story of 
action, of thrilling- adventures, of forest life ; because it is a good, clean story. 
Every woman likes this book because it demands justice for women — to 

whom justice is often denied. 

* 

44 Mr. Hornaday's book can be described only as delightful, without any 
mental reservations. It bubbles over with amusing speeches and situations, 
and from the pretty dedication to his daughter, on through its more than 
four hundred pages, there is not a platitude or a monotonous line. No man 
with this handsome volume on his table can have any justification for 
moodiness, while those * addicted to hysteria and weak tea' will find them- 
selves lifted out of their gloom by the wonderful charm of the story-telling 
faculty here displayed." — Ne^cv York Home Journal. 

Mr. Hornaday, the author of this book, is a frequent contributor to 
RECREATION and a warm supporter of the doctrines it teaches. Thus far 
his life work has been that of a zoologist, traveler, and business man. For 
ffare years he traveled through the West Indies, South America, Europe, 
India, Ceylon, and Borneo, as a collecting: naturalist, studying man and 
nature. For eight years he was connected with the United States National 
Museum, and National Zoological Park, at Washington. Five years were 
spent in business in Buffalo. He is now director of the great Zoological 
Park, which is being established in New York. His published writings in- 
clude four books, many papers on zoological subjects, and stories and sketches 
in periodicals of many kinds. 

"The Man Who Became a Savage," is a book of 4J3 pages. It is 
published at $1.50, but I have bought a large edition of it, and can furnish it 
to new subscribers for RECREATION, or to those who renew their subscriptions 
within the next few months, at fifty cents a copy, postage paid. This is an 
opportunity rarely offered, and I hope many readers will take advantage of iu 



" Recreation " One year, and CM$ Book, for $1.50 



RECREA TION. xi 



If you get the IHPROVED 

GRAn-OPHONE 

You have an instrument which by actual test has completely filled the New York 
Metropolitan Opera House and which has been distinctly heard with a good 
volume, in the open air, for nearly half a mile. 

Berliner's great invention itself was scarce- 
ly more marvelous in its inception than are 
the improvements to which it has been sub- 
jected during the past three months — improve- 
ments making it 1,000 per cent, better than 
ever before, and placing it in a class entirely 
alone. The GRAMOPHONE not only 

"TALKS 
TALK" 



as no other machine ever began to do, 
but its songs and instrumental music 
are now genuine reproductions, not for 
a moment to be confounded with indis- 
tinct and feeble imitations by less suc- 
cessful methods. Do not, therefore, 
make the mistake of thinking you have 
ever heard a real Talking or Singing 
Machine till you have heard the Im- 
proved GRAMOPHONE, with its new 
sound-box, new motor, and new records; 
it is positively and pre-eminently with- maurice forko-a 

OUt a rival. Singing the French Laughing "Song for the Gramophone 

This No. 25 Spring Motor Machine, which runs by clockwork, we send, express prepaid, with complete 
outfit for $2--,. 

PERFECT SATISFACTION GUARANTEED, or machine may be returned immediately. Money 
refunded, less express charges. 

Other styles for $10 and $15. SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

FIRST-CLASS AGENTS WANTED 

NATIONAL GRAMOPHONE COMPANY, 874 Broadway, New York 




Ask to hear the machine that 
"TALKS TALK" 



Xll 



RECREA TION. 



Genuine Siberian Moose Huntin ^ Golf or 

ABSOLUTELY WATER=PROOF TO THE TOP. W<ilkillg ShOCS 

NOTHING SO GOOD EVER PRODUCED BEFORE AT ANY PRICE. 

I This is a Special line of Boots and Shoes in every way. Special water-proof 

leather, special anhydrous soles, special lasts of new design, special stitching, special 
% lining, in fact, every point of shoe worth 

has been studied to give each special value. 

The result is a shoe as strong as steel, 

yet, pliable and soft as kid, graceful to 

the eye and easy on the foot, and will 

outwear any two ordinary shoes. 

The leather is the famous Siberian 

Moose. Costs more than any other, 

and guaranteed water-proof. 

The color is a dark Russia tan, so much 

in vogue. 

The soles are of the best anhydrous oak 
stock, made water-proof by patented 
process. 

The stitching will not rip. The bottoms 
are hand-sewed with Barbour's extra 
heavy water-proof flax. The uppers 
are stitched and then double-stitched 
with pure silk. 

Bellows tongues of the best Moose stock 
are used, making the shoes water- 
proof to the top. 

The linings are of finest russet calf- 
skin, adding warmth and strength. 

English Backstays, extra heavy 
eyelets, " Bull Dog" toes, Pratt 
Fasteners, etc., etc. Every ap- 
proved shoe point will be found in 
them. Price to all alike, $7. 50 net. 



I 

♦ 

I 
I 




We also make a short boot, 12 

inches high, at $8.50; a knee 

boot," Hunter's Style," lacing 

up the front, at $10.00, 

and a " Cavalry Style " 

boot at $12.00, all with 

the same good points 

as the shoes. 



The cut is a photograph of our tan walking shoe after having been worn two months. 



RECREA TIOX. 



\tJ d,t *pl.25?" 1893. 



Elastic Ribbed 

UNION SUITS 

are complete undergarments,cov- 
ering the entire body like an addi- 
tional skin. Perfectly elastic, fit- 
ting like a glo ve, but softly and with- 
out pressure. No buttons down 
the front. Made for Men, Women, 
and Young People. Most conven- 
ient to put on or off, being entered 
at the top and drawn on like 
trousers. With no other kind of 
underwear can ladies obtain such 
perfect fit for dresses or wear 
comfortably so small a corset. 



ONEITA KNITTING MILLS, 



Send for illustrated booklet. 
ADDRESS DEPT. L 



Office : No. 1 Greene St., N. Y. 




FuahFI^ Chicago., 

I OWL^ NdvYork.Boston.Providence.Londoi 

' : Drop us & Postal for a '97Cafalogue's 







9 



U 



ilriderWtar 



The Only Truly Hygienic Underwear Made. 
PHYSICIANS 

have accorded the most unanimous endorsement to the 

HARDERFOLD UNDERWEAR, 

and the theory upon which it is constructed, that any 
article of clothing has ever received. Over eleven hun- 
dred physicians, representing every state and territory 
in the Union, have united in testifying to the sanitary- 
excellence of the HARDERFOLD system of under- 
clothing. Two or more thin fabrics are lighter, wann- 
er, and in every way better than heavy single fabrics. 

HARDERFOLD FABRIC CO., Troy, N.Y. 

Send for Illustrated Pamphlet. 



XIV 



RECREA TION. 




\ _,.<*« 







MENNEN'S 

BORATED TALCUM 

Toilet Powder 

Approved by Highest Medical Authorities and Nurses as a 
perfect Sanitary Toilet preparation for infants and adults. 

WRITE FOR FREE SAMPLE 

(Name Recreation.) 

Get MENNEN'S (the only genuine) 

Refuse All Other Powders, which are Liable to 

do Harm. 
Positively relieves Prickly Heat, Perspiration, Nettle 
Rash, Chapped Skin, Sunburn, etc., etc. Banishes all 
odor. Removes Blotches, Pimples, and Tan. Makes 
the skin smooth and healthy. Delightful after shaving. 
Sold by druggists or mailed for 25 cents, to any address. 

GERHARD MENNEN CO., 500 Broad Street 
NEWARK, N. J. 






|aen5en^ 




m& 



, ,/Z INFANTS AND ADULTS 
?***** MENNEH CHElll^V 



Wagstaf? i>)& ^ CO. N.Y, 



RECREA 77 ON 



XV 



WOODBURY'S 



FACIAL SOAP, FACIAL CREAM 
FACIAL POWDER 
and DENTAL CREAM 



THE GRANDEST TOILET COMBINATION KNOWN FOR THE 

SKIN, SCALP, COMPLEXION, and TEETH 



Manufactured by Dermatologist John H. Woodbury, 
who has had twenty-six years' experience curing skin 
diseases and facial blemishes. The daily use of Wood- 
bury's Facial Soap and Facial Cream will eradicate all 
oiliness and other imperfections of the skin, and render 
the complexion clear, soft, and beautiful. They are 
sold everywhere. 

DOCTORS recommend Wood- 
bury's Facial Soap for washing 
infants, and for ladies' all-arounc 
use it is matchless. 

WOODBURY'S FACIAL SOAP 
is antiseptic. 

AS WE NEVER KNOW when 
germs are around, the safe way is 
to use WOODBURY'S FACIAL 
SOAP whenever any washing is 
done. 

It is HARD, and one cake will 
outlast two orditiarv cakes of soap. 

Woodbury's Facial soap 

is cleansing, healing, and refresh- 
ing. 

THEATRICAL PEOPLE find 
it excellent for washing off grease 
paint and make-up. 

JOHN H. WOODBURY has had 
over 26 years' practical experience 
treating the complexion. 

IF ANYBODY knows what is 
good for the skin, JOHN H. 
WOODBURY does. 

FACIAL SOAP is an ideal sham- 
poo. 

AFTER A BATH with Facial 
Soap, nothing is so soothing, soft- 
ening, healing, and cooling to the 
skin as an application of WOOD- 
BURY'S FACIAL CREAM. 

WOODBURY'S FACIAL 
CREAM contains no gum, oil, or 
grease of any kind whatever. 

THE HANDS can be gloved im- | 
m2diately after applying FACIAL 
CREAM ; it is not in the least gummy or sticky. 

WOODBURY'S FACIAL CREAM will keep fresh 
and sweet indefinitely. 

WOODBURY'S FACIAL CREAM is a blossom- 
scented softener, healer, and beautifier. 

WOODBURY'S FACIAL CREAM is unequalled 
for freckles, sunburn, eczema, and all mild cutaneous 
affections. 

Woodbury's Dental Cream is endorsed by the 
dental profession, is fragrant, contains no grit to 
scratch the enamel off the teeth, and is put up in 
tubes, which makes it convenient to use at home 
or when travelling-. Each tube will last from three 
to four months, is sold by all druggists and fancy 
goods dealers, or mailed on receipt of 25 cents. 




PSSSS3 

5 F 



For 10 cents we will mail you a sample 

S of either Woodbury's Facial Soap or 

ffl Woodbury's Facial Cream, with 132-page 

S illustrated book on beauty, containing 

many valuable toilet hints and treat 

ment for the skin, scalp, and complexion. 



FACIAL CREAM CAN BE freely used on the face 
and will absolutely not cause superfluous growth of hair. 

NOTHING so quickly removes freckles, tan, or sun- 
burn as an application of WOODBURY'S FACIAL 
CREAM. 

THE HANDS, face, and mouth should be washed 
with WOODBURY'S FACIAL SOAP afler exposure. 

For inflamed eyelids rub in a little WOODBURY'S 
FACIAL CREAM. It gives immediate relief. 



5=r-^»l 











THE USE OF WOODBURY'S FACIAL CREAM 
will not only relieve the inflammation, but, if rubbed 
around the eves, rub out the wrinkles. 

To sum all'up, WOODBURY'S FACIAL SOAP and 
FACIAL CREAM are the grandest combination on 
earth. PURE, ANTISEPTIC, MEDICINAL, they 
cleanse, purify, beautify, refresh, and preserve the Skin 
and Complexion of all humanity from the cradle up. 

The John H. Woodbury Dermatological Institute 
was established twenty-six years ago, and is the largest 
establishment in the world for the treatment of skin 
diseases, facial blemishes, and featural deformities. 

Twenty-three skilled physicians are constantly em- 
ployed. Each is a specialist. Eczema, pimples, moles, 
and warts are successfully cured. Superfluous hair, 
freckles, and all blemishes removed permanently. 

Rheumatism, neuralgia, sciatica, gout, and nervous 
diseases treated by Static Electricity without shock. 

Woodbury's Facial Powder is harmless, con- 
tains nothing to irritate the skin, when used is 
invisible and will not cause blackheads, makes the 
skin transparent, is recommended by the theat- 
rical profession, and sold by all dealers in toilet 
preparations, or mailed on receipt of 25 cents. 

KsasasasHsasasasasasas3sasESHSE55SESHsasHSHsasHsa£ES2sas 

9 For 20 cents we will send you by mail t 
ffl a trial package of each of Woodbury's ft 
ffl Facial Soap, Facial Cream, Facial Pow- Cj 
si der, and Dental Cream, with illustrated Ci 
book on beauty and how to improve the jjj 
complexion. ffi 

sacacaeji 



John rL Woodbury Dermatological Institute 

Offices for the cure of Skin and Nervous Diseases, the removal of Facial blemishes, and correction of any 

Irregularities of the Ears, Nose, Mouth, or Eyes. 



NEW YORK, 133 West 4 2d Street 
PHiLADELPHIA, 1306 Walnut Street 



BOSTON, 11 Winter Street 
CHICAGO, State cor. Monroe Streets 



Address all correspondence to 133 west 42d street, new York 



xvi RECREA TWN. 



ffi Send for Catalog of $*5 

m m 

m , rx ^«^^ m 



m 



1 VICTOR 

1 FOOTBALL | 

1 GOODS 1 

m # m 

iffi They are leaders for quality of material, fine S[J 

fatf workmanship, and improvements Ntf, 

m m 

m & m 

mm 

HI The Victor Intercollegiate Football j^j 

Is used and recommended by leading: college players 



(Examine our new model, pointed end ball, the latest shape) j*^ 

m m 

§fQ The New Victor Face Mask and Head Protector ^ .», (j3R 

g^J has many advantages over the old style ^ j^ 

m m 

t&H ste \& ^ e manufacture our own Football Shoes ^jn 

^v ^ ^ and can quote lowest prices «^v 

SS< Special prices for team outfits furnished on application JA 



§ OVERMAN WHEEL CO. I 

SSI & 

jes Makers of Victor Bicycles 



New York Boston Chicago Detroit 

9R Denver San Francisco Portland, Ore. [JR 




"THEREFORE I JUMPED IT." 



Volume VII. 



RECREATION. 

SEPTEMBER, 1897. 
G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



Number 3. 



HOW THEY DIDN'T HIT HIM IN THE EYE. 

J. B. JENNETT (OLD SILVER TIP). 



What vivid recollections will at 
times roll in upon us — even of the days 
(or nights) when we used to steal our 
neighbors' apples! 

To-night there appears before my 
eyes the vision of my first bear. It 
seems as if the tragedy might have 
happened but yesterday, instead of 
many years ago. 

I was up in the Northwest territory, 
and winter was close at hand. I had 
a little money and formed the ac- 
quaintance of 2 men who had none. 
They were Ai bear hunters, while I 
was a tenderfoot; so of course I had 
to be initiated. 

They told me all kinds of stories, 
some of which fairly set me wild. The 
result was I put in my money and we 
went into the Rockies, in British Co- 
lumbia, to hunt bear. When we got 
to the trapping ground we put up our 
shack and then proceeded to build 
dead-falls for the next spring. By do- 
ing this in the fall, the men said that 
by the time spring came all the scent 
of our bodies would be gone; so it 
would be far easier to catch His Royal 
Highness than if the dead-falls were 
fresh made. 

The talk of each evening was, of 
course, about bear, and what we would 
do when we met one. The " old hunt- 
ers " told me, many times over, that 
they could hit a bear in the eye, when 
he was on the charge. 

Our battery consisted of 2 45-75- 
350 Winchester rifles, belonp-ms: to 



the " old hunters " while I had a 44- 
40-200 Winchester. This they called 
the "pop-gun"; but it made them 
pop in a way they did not like, one 
day. 

Down below where we were 
camped, about 4 miles, there was an 
old bear hunter by the name of Aleck. 
His other name I never knew, for he 
would never tell it. He was either 
English or Scotch, and was a gentle- 
man. I often thought that at some 
time he must have handled consider- 
able money; that he had lost it and 
had then taken up a hunter's life. One 
thing certain: he knew what he was 
about when face to face with " Old 
Ephraim." Nearly every night, just 
before going to bed, I was cautioned 
that if we ever saw a bear I must not 
shoot at him with that " pop-gun." I 
had asked Old Aleck's opinion of the 
44; but he would never give it. My 
mind was made up that, come what 
would, if I ever saw a bear, no matter 
what part — if only the tail — I was go- 
ing to have the first shot. I looked at 
it in this light; that if the other 2 could 
hit a bear in the eye while charging, 
they were in no danger. 

One morning we were going out to 
build a dead-fall. It had snowed about 
2 inches during the night and we 
struck the fresh trail of Old Ephraim. 
I asked the other men what we should 
do. After a little talk we decided to 
follow it up. As we went along my 
faith was a little shaken in my pards. 



172 



RECREA TION. 



If they were bear hunters why did they 
want to discuss a subject that we came 
into the woods to do — i.e. kill bears. 
Why not start on the trail as soon as 
found? That's what I kept thinking 
to myself, as we went along. 

The bear led us a fine chase, up the 
side of a steep hill. Suddenly my 
pards stopped. We had found the 
bear. He was standing across the 
trail, right side to us, head turned 
toward us, nose slightly up in the air 
as if smelling us. I looked at my 
pards, and they were as white as the 
snow around us. There and then it 
went through my mind that they knew 
nearly as much about Old Ephraim as 
I did. 

As for myself, well, I felt queer. 
My flesh seemed full of pins and nee- 
dles. My blood ran cold. My heart 
seemed to stop beating. Of one 
thing I am certain. If I had not shut 
my mouth, like a No. 6 Newhouse 
steel trap, my heart would sure have 
jumped out; but as I kept my face 
closed my heart tried to beat its way 
out, by way of my ribs. 

Of course you all know how quick 
a thought flies. On sizing up my 
pards up went the pop-gun and "pop" 
she went. So did I. I fired a snap 
shot for Old Ephraim's eye and never 
waited to see the result. I knew I 
could outrun either of the other men; 
and if not, what difference? They 
could hit him in the eye, while charg- 
ing. 

When I started on my 2 mile a min- 
ute gait, I heard the sound of hasty 
footsteps behind me, accompanied by 
a terrible string of oaths. Something 
sounded like " Hold on there! " But 
it made no difference in my gait. I 
was playing " Home, Sweet Home " 
with my feet. How true that old song 
seemed just then — " There's no place 
like home." 

In the space of but a few seconds 
there was no sound to be heard, save 
the fall of my feet, as I chased them 
down the hill side, and the thumping 
of my heart against my ribs as if say- 
ing, " Run Joe, Run." 



On reaching the shack I went in, 
without knocking, sat down on the 
lower bunk and then sized up the win- 
dow opposite, and the large chimney 
on my right, with its smoking black 
log, to be sure which way would make 
the best back door if Old Ephraim 
came in at the front door. Suddenly 
I heard the fall of feet, outside, and in 
came the door, hinges and all, my pards 
tumbling over each other, to get in 
first. Scared as I was it made me smile. 

Well, after a bit things quieted 
down. I wanted the men to come 
down to Old Aleck's with me, but 
they would not do it; so I went alone. 
As soon as I told the old man he put 
on a well worn belt, filled with 45-70- 
405 cartridges, and reaching up took 
down a 45 Sharp's rifle. His every ac- 
tion meant business. He never spoke 
a word but we started for our shack. 

On reaching there it was too late to 
go up the hill that day, so Old Aleck 
listened to the tale of the bear hunt, at 
the end of which, if he didn't give my 
pards fits — oh no! Then I give it up. 
The next morning we followed my 
trail up the hill. At one place we 
found a pile of dead-falls as high as 
my breast. My trail showed I had not 
gone around or climbed over, as the 
soft snow on the top had not been 
touched. Therefore I had jumped it. 

I don't remember much about the 
down trip. Of course I was not 
scared. I was only in a hurry to get 
home, for fear the bread might spoil. 
Then, to cap it all, on reaching the 
spot there was Old Ephraim. He had 
never followed us one step. The bul- 
let had hit him square in the eye. Old 
Aleck looked at me and said, 

" My boy, take my advice, and in 
future always see where your bullet 
goes, before you run." 

And I have ever since followed his 
advice. It would be good advice for 
some other " hunters " to follow, too. 

After getting the meat and hide 
home, I divided the grub with my 
pards, took up my residence with Old 
Aleck, and we got several bear, the 
following spring. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY F. E. HATTHEWSON. 

THE CAPTAIN OF THE LIBBIE. 

Awarded Fifteenth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




Utai Di« fU to gun and is dressed lor out-door fiiii, 
With k takerkks coining to lier kus, 
AH the rabbits Slide at home jor ttej do not fa to nun, 
And tlie jiifriages imt liijli aiiionj 1k frees ; 

WteiMiirdftster^iii. 

&i when dictate ainand ^ih;praii Wprtoifiri booh 

\ Jit tte weliij f i| to din)) riflif fa ii fa; 
And the waj k bag* the fame is indeed a jiejfef sJ»e 5 
For she (jris tlie laujli on us lw "sjwfinj men « ? 
ThisDiana and Jier aun- 



leiisktofoaraij ahin^taniire asijoii were horn 
¥e will gamble M of pine $M l« no W, 

id tte birds will rue fie day if J)ana |)«d Iter m$, 
Wliile we men will toinaja ^i/rtiii^teW, 

Toj)]fflaai)flterpn, 




WORK OF THE SWINE. 



Editor Recreation: You are after hogs. 
So am I, when such a picture as this comes 
before me. One hundred and thirty-three 
king fish, arranged for their post mortem 
photograph, in such a delicate, feminine 
manner! The fellow in the fore-ground, 
with no chin, whose bullet head is covered 
by a yachtsman's cap, I will wager sug- 
gested the unsportsmanlike arrangement 
of the fish. He looks to be that kind. Note 
the " smiling josey," with spraddled legs, 
near the port main shrouds — the only 
other man wearing a cap. Is he a sports- 
man? Well I guess "nit!" A sportsman 
was never known to go fishing and bring 
home his pants with the crease down the 
front still intact! 

The old gentleman who finds it necessary 
to steady himself by the main halliards, is 
all right. He doesn't pretend to be a sports- 
man and doesn't know any of the unwritten 
laws of sportsmanship. He is a jolly good 
fellow and undoubtedly furnished first class 
beer, for this trip, and got away with his 
full share. The belted gentleman, in white 
flannels and straw hat, looks as if he should 
know better, and I believe he does; but has 
made up his mind to brazen it out for the 
benefit of the no chinned chap beside him, 
to whom he probably owes a poker debt. 



The one man who knows he has run into 
a bum crowd, and is heartily ashamed of 
them and of himself, but is honorable 
enough to take his share of the blame in 
a sportsmanlike manner, with the mental 
reservation that it shall never happen again, 
is the honest old soul to the right of the 
smiling josey. Shame is sticking out all 
over him; and the boys who run the boat 
are none too proud of their, party. 

Let me suggest to these men that if they 
will separately take a small boat, with an 
oarsman, arm themselves with a pair of 
light grains, each, and row over the king 
fish grounds endeavoring to spear or. 
technically, strike the king fish, they will 
get about 1,800 per cent, more fun out of 
the day's sport, kill fewer fish and will be 
thought of a great deal more kindly by 
their friends. There are a lot of people in 
this world to whom success means quan- 
tity, not quality. 

I am familiar with this fish, and with all 
kinds of Florida fishing, and it sickens me 
to see such a brazen exposure, of such 
damnably hoggish waste of time and of 
good fish. You have my permission to re- 
fer to me any one desiring to take excep- 
tion to my language. J. D. P. 

Omaha. Neb. 



C75 



AN AUTUMN HORSEBACK TRIP. 



J. F. GORDON. 



After much planning to get away from 
business, we, Al., Rex., Harry and I, finally 
decided on a date for a horse-back trip from 
M , N. Y., to Lackawaxen, up the Dela- 
ware river. We started late in the after- 
noon, going through Otisville and over the 
mountain, from which a good view of the 
Erie R.R.'s stone crusher, and a little far- 
ther down the road, a grand view of the 
surrounding mountains and valleys is ob- 
tained. This bit of scenery, as viewed from 
the window of a rapidly moving passenger 
coach, although fine, is but a taste as com- 



150 feet below; and above, for almost the 
same distance, tons upon tons of rock over- 
hang. The canal is so directly beneath that 
a hat could be tossed into it, and Harry 
cast a stone far out into the river. We 
were afterward told that when the road was 
first proposed, a great many people 
doubted whether it could be built and 
whether, in the springtime, it would not 
slide down the mountain; but the road is 
still there. 

The game preserve of the McKenzie es- 
tate is near here. On reaching it we dis- 




EN ROUTE. 



pared with that obtained from the saddle, 
with time to stop and enjoy it fully. Con- 
tinuing we wound down the mountain, 
through Cuddebackville. What a road for 
bicyclists! For miles it is as hard and 
smooth as a floor, with no " hills as are 
hills." _ 

Passing the Standard Oil Co.'s pumping 
station, from which oil is forced over the 
mountain, we pushed on to Port Jervis, 
where we arrived just at dusk. 

Early next morning we were off by way 
of the Hawk's-nest road which, in its way, 
is extremely interesting. It is built on the 
side of the mountain, which, at the highest 
point, is perpendicular. The road over- 
looks a narrow valley in which are the 
Erie R.R., the river and the D. & H. canal. 
The river and canal are, we judged, about 



mounted and, looking through the fence, 
counted 17 elk — 2 of which were bulls, 
with massive antlers. Either pair would be 
fine to have around, not only as an orna- 
ment, but useful for cherry picking or as a 
fire escape. 

In another part was a species of foreign 
deer which none of us could identify, and 
there was no one about to tell us. They 
were entirely different from the American 
deer and were very beautiful. 

After a dinner at Barryville, which is just 
across the river from the well known resort, 
Shohola Glen, we made for the Minisink 
battle ground. Our route took us through 
the woods over one of those delightful 
roads full of rocks, stumps, overhanging 
branches, etc. Here we flushed a pair of 
ruffed grouse, which, by the way, were the 



176 



AN AUTUMN HORSEBACK TRIP. 



177 



only wild game we saw on the trip. Ob- 
taining our final directions from 2 quarry- 
men working nearby, we rode through a 
pasture lot, up through the woods and on 
to the battle ground. 

The spot, on which the last and most 
bloody part of the struggle occurred is 
the top of the mountain, quite level, about 
an acre in extent and commands a beau- 
tiful view of the surrounding country. We 
found Hospital Rock and traces of the old 
fortification. 

Down the mountain from here is a dam in 
the river, the water thus stored being used 
to feed the canal. Here, too, the canal 
crosses the river, and, taking the tow-path, 
we crossed over into Lackawaxen. Al. re- 
ceiving an expected telegram, we resumed 
the tow-path for Barryville where we spent 
the night. 

On entering the village we overtook 
a fine, sleek pair of tow-mules. They had 
heard our clatter in the rear and, not be- 
ing able to see us (having closed bridles) 
they took fright and one of them prepared 
to defend himself. Rex. and Al. were in 
the lead and got by all right, but at that 



instant a pair of hoofs and a whiffle-tree 
shot out and Harry and I had business 
right where we were. Here I could lie a 
little, but speaking with due regard for the 
truth, I counted 27 mule feet in the air at 
one time, all operated by the same mule, 
to say nothing of double trees, whiffle- 
trees, chains, ropes, tug straps, etc. Con- 
cluding we were stalled indefinitely. Rex 
and Al. bade us good night; but noticing 
that the tow line lay on the ground we 
waited an opening and shot over between 
the canal and the other mule. The last we 
saw of his kicklets he was still " fanning 
space." 

Early next morning we were on the tow- 
path again for home. We found the boat- 
men very good natured and obliging and 
exchanged a great deal of good natured 
chaff with them. Passing was sometimes 
quite difficult, but at such times they would 
cheerfully stop the teams to let us by. Our 

trip ended all too soon, and reaching M 

we separated, all wishing we were just start- 
ing instead of returning. In the 2 days we 
travelled 90 miles and hope to travel many 
more together. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY MRS. MYRA A. WIGGINS. 

THE HUNTER'S PAUSE. 
Joint Winner of First Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




WHITE AND YELLOW PERCH. 

In this plate are shown 2 species of fishes 
which are not only of interest to the com- 
mercial fishermen, but to the angler as well. 
The Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) , often 
called the Ring Perch, from the dark bars 
crossing the body, is one of the most 
abundant and best known of the smaller 
food fishes. It is found in fresh water lakes 
and streams throughout the Eastern United 
States, from Nova Scotia and the Great 
Lakes Southward to North Carolina and 
Iowa and the Ohio. It is particularly 
abundant in the coastwise streams and the 
Great Lakes, also in the small lakes of 
many of the Northern States. In those of 
Northern Indiana, and Northwestern Iowa, 
it is very numerous. It reaches a length of 
a foot and a weight of over a pound. While 
it cannot rank as one of the great game 
fishes it is none the less popular on that 
account. It is always a source of delight to 
the children, and to ladies learning to fish, 
and even with many men. Many an expert 
angler does not refuse to fill his creel with 
yellow perch when better fish fail him. The 
yellow perch is a vigorous biter and fights 
well, for a little while. Moreover it is a 
most delicious pan fish, if you know how 
to prepare it. 

The other species is the White Perch 
(M or one americana) , a fish found abundant- 
ly along our Atlantic coast, from New 
England to Florida, ascending all coast- 
wise streams. This fish reaches a length of 
a foot or less, and is easily caught oh the 
hook, with any kind of bait. It is most 
abundant in the tidewater portions of the 
rivers and always bites best on the flood 
tide. It is a good food fish, but its chief 



value lies in that it can always be caught, 
whether other fishes bite or not. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY SAM L KANDALI.. 

TWO COONS AND THE DOG THAT TREED 

THEM. 

Highly Commended in Recreation's Second Annual 
Photo Competition. 



You can get a gun, a fishing rod, a reel, 
a camera, a sleeping bag, a watch or a bi- 
cycle for nothing. Full particulars on page 
xlviii. of this issue. 



A North Carolina newspaper has this 
local item: — 

" As Colonel Williams was driving home 
yesterday, lightning struck his wagon and 
completely demolished a 4 gallon demijohn 
of fine whiskey. The Colonel has the sym- 
pathy of the community." — Atlanta Con- 
stitution. 



178 



THE OPENING OF THE SEASON. 



R. B. BUCKHAM. 



" She paints with white and red the moors, 
To draw the nations out of doors." 

— Emerson. 

In autumn it seems as if Nature had de- 
signed that man should be constrained to 
go to the fields or the woods. Certain it is 
at this season she bedecks herself in her 
most attractive garb — royal purple, scarlet 
and' gold; and indifferent indeed is he who 
can withstand her charms. Earth and sky 
are mellow with ripeness; the very air 
sparkles; while tree and bush and shrub 
seem striving to outdo each other in 
showering down their golden harvest. 
Simply to be abroad at such a time is a 
pleasure indeed; but to the sportsman this 
time brings other joys as well. It is then 
the ruffed grouse, king of game birds, 
throws down the gauntlet to the gunner, 
challenging him, with startling whir of 
wing, to a trial of skill and endurance; to a 
test of woodcraft. 

To outwit the wily bird is not always an 
easy task. The ruffed grouse, or partridge, 
as he is often called, is strong and swift of 
wing. In spite of his pinions being com- 
paratively small, he is a marvellously rapid 
flyer; and the whirlwind of leaves where he 
is flushed, bears testimony that no lack of 
energy is back of his beating wings. 

On rising from the ground, the flight of 
the grouse is generally straight for the tree- 
tops. Through and among them, after hav- 
ing gained sufficient headway, he goes, sail- 
ing and twisting, tipping and tilting, in an 
astonishing manner, until at length, his 
fright in a measure abating, he settles into 
some thick evergreen, or on the earth 
again. During this first upward rush is, in 
my opinion, the time to shoot. To be sure, 
there is the startling roar of wings to un- 
nerve one, but this nervousness is over- 
come in time, and only adds to the zest of 
the moment. 

Another peculiarity in the flight of this 
bird is observed later in the season, when 
the first snow is at hand, and when, from 
having been hunted, he is wild and sus- 
picious. At such times he will often perch 
high in some lofty evergreen, at the head 
of a ravine, and on the approach ot the 
hunter, will- launch forth from his watch- 
tower with a long, downward dive, thus al- 
most instantly acquiring an enormous ve- 
locity. It is not, however, the vagaries of 
flight alone that make the grouse so diffi- 
cult to shoot; for his favorite haunts are 
in the densest and most inaccessible woods, 
and though naturally somewhat stupid, on 
acquaintance with man he becomes shy and 
suspicious. 

The nature and habitat of this bird are a 



study worth the attention of every sports- 
man. In fact, he must, if he would meet 
with success, apply himself to the close ob- 
servation of his ways, preserving in mem- 
ory each incident remarked, no matter of 
what seeming insignificance. In this way 
the huntsman will become familiar with his 
habits, and his cunning will be easy to 
master. From many a covert that would 
yield naught but disappointment to the 
tyro, the observant gunner will gather a 
good bag. 

The time of the white and red moors of 
the poet is now at hand. Anxiously has the 
sportsman been awaiting its coming. Long 
has he watched for the forest to again float 
on the breeze its gaudy-colored ensign. 
May his patience be rewarded! May he 
fare as well as I did, some years ago! That 
hunt is still fresh in my memory. 

For a month or more, my brother Joel 
and I had been uneasily waiting for cool 
weather and the opening of the season, to 
try our luck once more with the grouse. 
In every conceivable way we had been 
whiling the time — polishing our guns again 
and again, until they fairly shone; school- 
ing and encouraging our dog, a black 
cocker spaniel; and discussing the haunts 
and the peculiarities of our favorite bird. 
Our plan was to open the campaign back 
among the mountains, where, we had heard, 
the grouse were unusually plentiful. The 
day came at last, and in the early morning 
we were far on our way and well up in the 
thick evergreen forests. 

Anyone whose knowledge of the woods 
has been gained solely from suburban 
woodlands, can hardly conceive of the 
grandeur of primitive forests. Beneath 
one's feet is the brown woodland carpet — 
leaves of evergreens that have fallen year 
after year, interwoven with mosses and 
lichens — softer and thicker than any of 
man's devising, and much less noisy. 
Above are the giant firs and spruces. The 
solemn, peaceful stillness makes it seem 
like consecrated ground. 

This is the stronghold of the grouse, and 
with feelings akin to awe we reached the 
depth of the woods. Hardly a sound was 
heard, save the ceaseless soughing of the 
wind in the treetops. " Not a vestige of 
life is here," one would have said. Our 
dog, however, was of a contrary mind. 
The silence was quickly broken by the ring 
of his cheery bark and the boom and whir 
of wings. 

If there is anyone who is unable to com- 
prehend what pleasure the gunner gets 
from his sport; if any man fails to see how 
genuine amusement can be gained from 



179 



ISO 



RECREA TION. 



tangle and thicket, let him place himself in 
such a position. His scepticism will van- 
ish and he will become an enthusiast on the 
spot; possibly, dashing about in senseless 
frenzy of excitement. At least, such has 
again and again been the fate of the scoffer. 
The woods rang with the reports of our 
guns, and with hearty shouts of triumph at 
some exceptional success. Even the grim 
and gnarled trees seemed to join in our 
sport, echoing and re-echoing to one an- 
other, as if in encouraging applause. On 
we followed, in the wake of the dog, ac- 
cepting without question his course; nor 
did we have reason to complain. Though 
he led through swamps and thickets, it was 



to bring us always to the hiding places of 
the birds. 

While the sun rose high and sank again, 
our hunt continued. Grouse were on every 
side; not singly or by 2's and 3's, but in 
coveys, leading us on with barely time to 
stop or to rest. At length the sinking sun 
admonished us to stop. Not until then did 
we sit down to count our spoils. 

What a day we had! What a bag we 
made! Such gala days have seldom fallen 
to my lot. Truly, the first of the season is 
the best; and well it is the opening day 
should long be cherished as a just reward 
to the conscientious sportsman, for -his 
faithful waiting through the close season. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY B. J. WARREN. 

AN EARLY BREAKFAST. 
Awarded Twenty-fourth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 



Teacher — Why did Delilah cut all the 
hair from Samson's head before she pro- 
ceeded to his undoing? 

Tommy — So she could snatch him bald- 
headed better. — Richmond Dispatch. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY W. L. RATHBONE. 

IN TROUBLE. 

Awarded Twenty-third Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY E. V. R. THAYER. 

A JUNE AFTERNOON. 
Awarded Twenty-seventh Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

181 



A CYCLE RACE, WITH A SEQUEL. 



MISS C. H. THAYER. 



If we do not live in Chicago, New York 
or Boston, there is just as much wheeling 
enthusiasm to the square inch in our little 
town as in any of those cities; and there 
are any number of bright girls who can 
beat at golf and tennis, or do a century 
without wilting like frosted flowers. Al- 
though we can boast no fine parks, there 
are good roads, and high hills that one may 
descend like an avalanche, with the exhila- 
rating risk of breaking one's neck before 
reaching the bottom. 

Nearly all the girls have wheels, and ride 
them, gracefully or awkwardly, according 
to the girl. What a difference there is! 
Some ride as if trying to hit their chins with 
their knees, at every revolution of the crank, 
while others glide along with scarcely any 
apparent pedal motion. Awkwardness does 
not seem to detract from the enjoyment; 
so what matter? 

Now, we wanted to have a race, but not 
a public one. " Where can we go?" was 
asked and discussed, as only a score of 
girls' tongues can discuss an interesting 
question. 

" If Mr. Canning would only let us use 
his beautiful drive," said one, " how lovely 
it would be! " 

" Propose a trip to the moon," suggested 
a sarcastic listener. 

" Or a road built by ourselves," pro- 
posed another. 

" Well, girls," I interposed, " why not ask 
Mr. Canning? He's not an ogre." 

" Very near it," cried a laughing girl. 
" He's a crusty old bachelor." 

" He has that reputation, because he pays 
no attention to ladies; but he may be diffi- 
dent." 

"Diffident! A millionaire diffident!" 

" Well," I persisted, " it's the only place 
for a race, and we shall have to give up the 
scheme altogether, or ask Mr. Canning. 
Who will do it?" 

" Not I! " resounded emphatically from 
all sides. 

' Then I shall, myself," I declared. 

"Olive Dawes!" exclaimed one; '"you 
won't dare to beard that old bachelor in 
his den!" 

" No, but I dare beard him in his hand- 
some house; and be delighted to get inside 
of it, too. Besides, he is not so terribly old 
—not more than 40, and some men are just 
lovely at that age." 

Mr. Canning is the wealthiest man of our 
town, and his residence is elegance itself, 
with a charming shaded drive all around it. 
On that charming shaded drive we wanted 
to have our race; but of course the owner's 
permission must be asked. It did require 
some confidence and self-assurance to ask 



it; but I put on a bold face, and said I 
would go if one of the other girls would go, 
too. 

" I'll do it," was the prompt reply, from 
Patty Armstrong. 

Very well," I replied, not greatly de- 
lighted; for we thought Patty an insignifi- 
cant little thing, who had reason to feel flat- 
tered with any notice we took of her. She 
had a deprecating air, as if apologizing for 
the liberty .of existing. 

However, that very afternoon, arrayed in 
our best and gayest, we called on Mr. Can- 
ning. We were shown into a room, the 
richness of which surpassed even my ex- 
pectations. I looked at Patty, supposing 
she would be completely overcome by such 
magnificence; but she appeared as cool and 
calm as if she had been used to such things 
all her life. 

Mr. Canning was gallantry itself. I felt a 
little nervous when he came in, but he was 
so polite 1 made my request without any 
hesitation. He granted it so cordially and 
pleasantly, I exclaimed, gushingly: " I 
think you are splendid! " 

He looked amused, and thanked me. 
Then he said he would give the winner of 
the race a prize and a banquet, in his large 
dining-hall. 

" Shall you both be contestants? " he in- 
quired. 

" I'll not," I replied. 

" I will," Patty said, to my amazement. 
The idea of that little washed-out creature 
trying to beat 20 wide-awake girls! 

Mr. Canning regarded her in the most 
benign manner. " I wish you success, Miss 
Armstrong," he said, with unnecessary em- 
phasis, it seemed to me; " and if I professed 
to judge faces, I would predict you will win 
the race." He evidently meant it, too. 

After this the girls were in a constant 
state of excitement; practising on their bi- 
cycles, and riding at break-neck speed — all 
except Patty, who did not ride much 
oftener than usual. 

" Why don't you practise fast riding?" 
I asked. 

" I don't want to waste all my strength 
beforehand," she replied. 

" She's wise," one of the girls scoffingly 
remarked. " She'll need all the strength 
she has to win the race." 

The eventful day came, and oh, how ex- 
cited we all were! There were 20 riders, all 
but poor Patty dr.essed in new bicycle suits 
that were gay and becoming. I always 
thought a horse race a splendid sight, but 
this was prettier. Such bright, expectant 
faces and flashing eyes; such animated 
gestures and laughing threats! 

At the signal, off they started, flushed 



THE MUSIC OE THE WOODS. 



t8 3 



and eager; well together, with Patty de- 
cidedly in the rear. 

' The silly little thing! " some one near 
me exclaimed. " What did she ride for? " 

" She may win yet," answered another 
voice. " Patty Armstrong is not the fool 
you think her." 

We all laughed. Now they had nearly 
finished the course. Suddenly, little Miss 
Armstrong threw herself forward, in gen- 
uine racing style, made a grand spurt and, 
shooting ahead of them all, reached the 
goal, breathless, but eager. 

" Hurrah! hurrah! splendid! splen- 
did! " arose the cheers from the little 
group of spectators. Poor, insignificant 
Patty was queen of the day. As for Mr. 



Canning, he acted like an overgrown 
boy; shouting, clapping his hands, and 
tossing up his hat in wild enthusiasm. 
Then he sprang forward to the triumphant 
girl, offered her his arm and led her to 
the house, into the banquet-hall. He seat- 
ed her in the victor's chair — a bower of 
roses. 

Patty did not have a deprecating expres- 
sion then. Her eyes shone and her cheeks 
outrivalled the roses she crushed at every 
movement. Now it was different. We no 
longer felt we were condescending to no- 
tice her, but were glad of her attention. 
That day Patty Armstrong won not only 
the race, but our most distinguished citi- 
zen as well. 




COPYRIGHT, 1897, BY WRIGHT & CARLIN. 



'ANOTHER OF MY POSES." 
See page 89, August Recreation. 



THE MUSIC OF THE WOODS. 



J. D. CRAWFORD, JR. 



There's something in the wild wind, sweeping o'er the hill, 

Or in a coyote's medley, to make one's whole soul thrill; 
Or at your camp in autumn, comes a feeling that is strange. 

When you hear a bull elk's bugle notes, far up the mountain range. 
There's something in the swish of the water flowing by 

That makes a sportsman wish he wasn't born to die. 
This something's in all Nature if we may only hear, 

'Tis music sweet, 'tis music grand, who'll lend a listening ear? 




MOUNTAIN SHEEP (OVIS MONTANA). 




ECHOES IN THE MOONLIGHT. 

MARGUERITE TRACY. 

The growing light of the harvest moon 
Follows the lingering twilight soon, 

Merrily over the waters blue 

Soundeth a yodle la — la — e— hoo! 

Laughing and calling a merry clan, 
Laughing and calling as light hearts can, 

Gathers together the whole dear crew 

Summoned by la — e — la la — e — la la — e — hoo! 

Out through the dusk where letters hide, 
Stealing the fairest of all, they glide; 

Is there a straggler? Call her — do — , 
Soft and low — la — la — e — hoo! 

Back to the fountain's rippling light, 
Lingering there till the dusky night 

Scatters them home thro' the falling dew ? 
Calling and answering la — e — hoo! 



Over the water's glistening play. 
Over the shadowy, darkening way, 

Floateth and echoeth faint but true, 
La — e — la la — e — la — e — hoo! 



*85 




RUFFED GROUSE (BONASA UMBELLUS). 



RUFFED GROUSE AND WOODCOCK. 



U. B. 



Toward the close of last August, a friend 
and I decided on a day after woodcock. 
The place we fixed on is known as Weaver's 
swamp, in the Southern part of Columbia 
county, New York. We had selected this 
locality because the dry weather had driven 
the birds from the smaller marshes. Here 
were springs and streams. 

The day of our hunt was hot; such a day 
as fairly curls one's gun barrels, and gives 
high pressure indeed to the powder. Our 
guns were Bakers; mine a 12 gauge, a trifle 
over 7 pounds in weight. Poor Jim took a 
heavy 10 gauge duck gun. Hurriedly pick- 
ing up the case in the dark, he did not 
discover his mistake until the hunting 
grounds were reached. His shells, he said, 
were loaded with $ l / 2 drams of powder and 
1^4 ounces of shot. After hearing the 1st 
discharge, I took it he meant pounds in- 
stead of drams and ounces. 

We arrived at the swamp just as it was 
light enough to tell the rich black mud 
from the heaps of decayed leaves. After 
putting the horse in a neighboring barn, 
we started to hunt, but as it was too dark 
to make out anything in the bushes, we sat 
down. That is, we intended to sit on a log, 
but it proved to be only a dark shadow 
over a streak of the softest mud I ever sat 
down in. We then got out of the bushes 
and held down a rail fence until sunrise. 

A walk of 15 minutes in the alders 
brought us to solid ground. As we had 
been wading in muck up to our knees, 
our faces and hands covered with mos- 
quitoes, this was some relief. The brush 
was almost impassable, but we worked 
around and sent the dog through. Follow- 
ing his movements among the bushes, we 
soon saw him crouch. At the command, 
" Go on," he took a step, and away went a 
bird. I let go an ounce of io's, propelled 
by 234 drams of nitro, while Jim turned 
his duck gun loose. The result was what 
might have been expected. The dog 
brought in a mouthful of feathers with a 
few fragments of skin and bones clinging 
to them. 

" Robin," I murmured. 

"Holy smoke, no! I'm sure it was a 
woodcock," said Jim. There the argument 
ended, for it couldn't be proven either way. 

The dog again stopped a short distance 
ahead, by an old log on a knoll covered 
with ferns. We advanced, and 2 birds 
flushed. As is usually the case, we fired 
at the same one, the 2d getting away; then 
followed a wade through mud knee deep for 
half an hour, with a result of 7 more wood- 
cock. 

We were now at the North side of the 



alders, near a huckleberry field. Of all 
things that tempt ruffed grouse, a huckle- 
berry field stands first. Before we were 
over the fence, the dog came to a stand. 
The click of safeties, or the sharp " go on," 
started a dozen birds, which scattered in all 
directions. I missed my 1st, but redeemed 
myself by grassing 2 with my left. Jim 
brought down 2, the 2d with a broken 
wing. This one started toward the swamp, 
he in hot pursuit with an empty gun. 

As I expected, he had not gone a dozen 
steps when up started 3 grouse with a flut- 
tering of wings that brought him to his 
senses. It was amusing to see him try to 
shoot with an empty gun, and then to hear 
him cuss because it would not go off. He 
joined in the laugh, remarking it was a 
mighty lucky thing for the birds. 

The dog having laid the dead grouse at 
my feet, I took no further notice of him 
while talking to Jim. When we were ready 
to move on, he was not in sight. A hasty 
search failing to reveal him, we walked on 
toward the alders, in the direction the 
wounded bird had gone. We found the 
dog a few rods away, crouching in the rank 
growth; but a walk all around him failed 
to show what he was pointing. A closer 
search revealed a small hole almost under 
the dog's nose. Jim, in rather a reckless 
way, reached in his hand, and drew out the 
lost grouse, dead. 

The next move was to look up the rest 
of the covey. Several had swung around 
toward a knoll dotted with bushes. Here 
the dog pointed. We advanced slowly and 
had almost reached the pointing dog, when, 
with a great flutter, a single grouse rose — 
an old bird. He twisted and dodged in a 
way that showed he was familiar with what 
was coming. " Boom — bom," then 2 spite- 
ful " cracks " from the nitro powder, but 
they served only to hasten his departure. 

The setter started ahead at the reports, 
utterly disregarding my " come in, sir." 

At his second jump, up rose a whole 
covey of young grouse. The old bird cer- 
tainly had a head on him that would have 
done credit to a larger body. Many sea- 
sons devoted to the art of escaping shot 
guns, served his family well. How nicely 
he had calculated! Every young bird was 
safe in the thick alders before fresh shells 
were in our guns. There we stood trying 
to force cartridges into the chambers base 
first, or, jamming them, concluded they 
were swollen, and tried others. 

Who has not been there? Do not smile, 
old veteran. This was not the first covey 
of grouse James and I ever pointed a gun 
at. On the contrary, we have hunted these 



i9° 



RECREA TION. 



sly birds under almost all conditions; but 
this was our first hunt for nearly a year. 
Then, too, a big covey of ruffed grouse 
creates a little excitement in almost any 
one's system. 

It was now n o'clock, and so hot our 
clothing was wet through with perspira- 
tion. Seeking the shade of a spreading 
hickory, we rested and ate our lunch. 
After an hour or so, the hunter's instinct 
began to assert itself again. This feeling 
was increased by the sound of muffled 
drumming, coming from the edge of the 
field under the alders. When within 40 
yards of the swamp, a young cock strutted 
up and down the fence that separated the 
field and marsh. The dog was sent ahead. 
As we expected, the bird flew directly up- 
ward. Jim sent a load of 8's into the air, 
doing no damage, and as the bird was 
nearly out of range, I dropped him. 

This was where the covey of young birds 
had been flushed. The dog got up 2 more 



in retrieving my bird, which shows how 
grouse will return to a certain spot. 

We now tried the marsh again, wading 
about for some hours. Several woodcocks 
were flushed, and a fair number of them 
killed. As we came out into the field, where 
our horse had been left, the lengthening 
shadows told that our day's sport was at 
an end. When the wagon was reached, 
our coat pockets were examined. The 
count showed 13 grouse and 9 woodcock. 
Not much of a bag, perhaps, if one judges 
by numbers, but we were well satisfied. 
We had had a day of royal sport, and the 
birds that were left have furnished us many 
a good time since. 

Give me a good companion, a fair num- 
ber of birds, and a well-broken dog, and 
my mind is at peace with the world. I can 
then, for the time being, forgive the man 
whose bull chased me out of a field wherein 
lived 40 woodchucks, with such haste that 
in climbing the fence I broke my rifle. 



OUR ALASKAN EXPLORING EXPEDITION.— CANOEING ON 

THE STICKEEN. 

A. J. STONE. 



As I have heretofore referred but briefly 
to the difficulties of navigating the Stick- 
een, I will here describe one of our experi- 
ences, in our first attempt to get up that 
river. 

There were 4 of us in the party, Ed, a 
white settler, with his Indian wife, and I. 
Our boat was a flat bottomed, sharp point- 
ed scow, well built, but too heavily laden 
for the strength of the oarsmen. We had 
been working very hard to make an aver- 
age of 7 miles a day. The lower Stickeen 
is very wide, and, in many places, divided 
into numerous currents and separate 
streams by long, narrow, wooded islands. 
As we had no pilot who knew the stream, 
we often took the wrong route and at- 
tempted channels that were simply impas- 
sable. 

We fought our way up until we gained 
a point almost opposite the Great glacier. 
Here we encountered a strip of water that 
flowed over a sand bar about 3 miles long, 
and that was so shallow we found we could 
wade it. Giant trees that had fallen and 
been brought down from above, were 
stranded here and there on this bar and 
gave lis no end of trouble. 

We must either travel through this 
stretch or go a long way back and around; 
and the latter we declined to do. The wa- 
ter was so rapid we could neither row nor 



pole our boats through it; so 2 of us waded 
it the entire length of the bar. We were 
compelled to use the greatest precaution 
in order to keep moving, the swift current 
often proving almost too much for us. 

After using up the greater part of the 
afternoon at this work we finally landed 
at the head of a little island, piled high 
with drift wood, at its upper end. In a 
little eddy, behind a large drift, we halted 
for rest, about 100 yards from the main- 
land. 

To our left was the main body of the 
river, while just ahead of us a heavy body 
of water left the main stream and poured 
over and down a side stream, through 
jagged rifts of lodged timbers. The cur- 
rent was simply frightful. There was no 
way around it. The river, to our left, was 
wide and. rapid enough to prevent our 
crossing. Where the side stream separated 
from the main one, there seemed a ridge 
or crest which we thought might be pass- 
able. We tried it, but after a desperate ef- 
fort, lost control of our boat and after be- 
ing turned 2 or 3 times and driven back 
with fearful force, managed to regain the 
eddy. 

The river was rising rapidly and night 
coming on. Something must be done. The 
island was low, and liable to be submerged 
before morning, so we could not think of 




11 WE AGAIN STARTED FOR THE MAINLAND." 



camping there. Stacking about half our 
supplies on top of the drift wood, so as to 
lighten our boat, we again started for the 
mainland, with a rush, and were again 
driven back. Then we unloaded more of 
our freight, and a third attempt proved 
successful, only after the most determined 
effort. Several times I thought we would 
fail, and several times it seemed we would 
sink in the boat, exhausted. When we 
finally landed we could barely crawl up the 
low, grass covered bank. 

But what about our supplies — our cam- 
eras, plates, guns, and provisions — back on 
the drift wood? 

The man we had with us, a brave man 
and a good canoeman, saw I was perplexed. 
We had over 300 feet of rope with us and 
he suggested that, after unloading the boat, 
he and I coil in the rope, make fast one 
end to the shore, let ourselves back to the 
island and leave Ed and the Indian woman 
to tow us in. 

We undertook this and down we went 
like a shot. We managed to make the 
proper landing, but by the time our stuff 
was loaded our rope had fouled under some 
drift wood, about half way, and could not 
be recovered. Taking my position in the 
bow I took in rope, hand over hand, until 
near where it was fast, when we were sud- 



denly thrown from our course by the cur- 
rent; and had the rope not been cut, in- 
stantly, we would have capsized. 

When the rope parted we were driven 
violently down the side current but man- 
aged to land about a quarter of a mile be- 
low, on the mainland. Towing and brush- 
ing were then in order, to reach camp, 
which was accomplished at 3 o'clock the 
following morning. 

All this time the mosquitoes fairly drove 
us crazy; and we were so fatigued we could 
not think of cooking a meal. There were 
some cold boiled beans in the kettle and 
we managed to make some tea. These 
comprised our repast after 14 hours' exer- 
tion and excitement, and we went to sleep 
on the ground, with our heads under pieces 
of muslin to keep off mosquitoes. 

The next day we rested, fought mosqui- 
toes, and watched the drift wood disappear, 
at the point where our supplies had been 
stacked the evening before. 

I could relate man)'' other incidents of 
the trip, equally hazardous, but will only 
say that to navigate the Stickeen requires 
the best of canoemen, and at least one who 
knows the river. It was after discovering 
these facts that I turned back to Fort Wran- 
gle and secured a complete Indian crew, 
who knew the stream, to take us up. 



i 9 t 



CATCHING A TARTAR. 



CAPT. J. G. LEEFE, U. S. A. 



When Yellow Jack made his biennial 
entry into New Orleans, the garrison of 
Jackson barracks retreated, in good order, 
and took up a position on Ship island. This 
was in 1870. The island is simply a bar, 
belonging to Mississippi; but, unlike other 
bars to which her faithful sons thirst for ad- 
mittance, this one is entirely surrounded 
by water. It is about 12 miles off Biloxi; 
laved on the South shore by the emerald 
waters of the Gulf of Mexico, but only half 
washed by the muddy surge of Mississippi 
sound on the North. 

Here we arrived at midnight, and were 
welcomed by half the entire male popula- 
tion, to wit: the light-house keeper, who 
shone resplendent in a new wooden leg, the 
gift of a grateful country. The other half, 
a high-toned goat, deferred his part of the 
ceremony until the next morning. Then 
he appeared before the commanding officer, 
bowed gravely, and butted him off the 
plank walk leading across the sand. -His 
goatship at once retired, with dignified 
slowness, to his fastness at the other end of 
the island, and stayed there. 

Incited by the Doctor, who had been 
there before, we brought with us lots of 
hooks and lines and other things with 
which to lure the wary fish. There was lit- 
tle chance for angling on the South shore, 
but the surf was fine. So tempting was it, 
Lieutenant O'Bog declared he would " be 
afther lavin' mesilf in it for a bit ov a 
shwim." However, when a swift and shin- 
ing shark rolled over on its side, and, with 
a bland smile, showed 6 rows of gleaming 
teeth, the Celt took water and swore he 
would " bate the likes of that naygur wid a 
hook." 

There was fishing to spare on the North 
shore, and the long pier jutting thence *4 
of a mile, until it met clear water, was the 
daily resort of idle men in blue, eager for 
bites. Many a polished rod swung to shore 
the shining perch. There were lots of 
sheepshead, green trout, silverfish, and 
others that shall be nameless, because I do 
not know what they were. Sometimes we 
hooked a pompano, the pout if ex maximus 
of all flat fish. Now and then a shoal of 
redfish huddling shoreward, leaping and 
fleeing in terror from a pursuing porpoise, 
" would the multitudinous seas incarna- 
dine." 

Sharks of every species pervaded the 
deep at times; and so the smaller fry did 
not fare so well. One scorching, nibble- 
less day, Mr. O'Bog's "naygur" was in- 
quisitive, regarding 6 pounds of salt pork, 
and was hauled ashore, to be despatched 
by the irate Celt. Then some one else be- 
came an object of envious interest by land- 



ing another kind of shark (one of the no 
name series), small, black and glossy, with 
upper part of snout corrugated, like the 
sole of a tennis shoe. 

The piece de resistance of our feast of fish- 
ing came to the surface on a fine September 
day, when the wind was lively from the 
Northeast and the waves were turbulent. 
Not so rough, however, as to disturb nu- 
merous albatrosses that rode the waves like 
old caravels at anchor. The Doctor came 
up smiling, prophesying devil-fish. Sud- 
denly the albatrosses took to themselves 
wings; the already storm-tossed waters 
grew unduly vexed; while a line The 
O'Bog had set for shark tautened — a splash, 
a snap, and back flew a part of the line 
against the pile to which it was attached. 
Close to the pier, careening swiftly by on 
the top of the waves, we saw a monstrously 
hideous thing! 

Before the Doctor could find breath 
enough to gasp, " th- th- that's one of 'em," 
the thing disappeared. It was flat, diamond- 
shaped, like the mortar-board hats worn 
by students, and appeared 12 feet across. 
Its glistening back was dark, but as it 
swayed from side to side, like an overhand 
swimmer, its belly flashed white through 
the pale green waves. In front of its hid- 
eous head, moving back and forth and later- 
ally, was a pair of feelers, or tentacles, each 
about 4 yards long, resembling serpents. 
Close about its beaked mouth writhed and 
twisted a mass of smaller claws. Its huge 
round eyes, like a pair of gig-lamps, shone 
with glassy fierceness. 

There was no more fishing. Discussions 
were in order. At the mess that evening, 
when cigars had been lighted, the Doctor, 
with his usual air of having " been there 
before," shied his castor into the arena. 

" You are of course aware gentlemen," 
he began, " we have to-day seen one of the 
great family of Mollusca, of the class ceph- 
alopoda, mis-called by the mariners of these 
waters, ' devil-fish.' " The Doctor's fine 
courtesy in assuming we knew what he was 
talking about, won from us a spontaneous 
burst of silence. 

" If I may ask you," he continued, " to 
remember the oyster, which has formed a 
not unimportant part of this repast, and 
then to pass to the contemplation of the 
proportions of the monster that made 
away with Mr. O'Bog's hook and line, you 
may form some idea of the extreme range 
in this class of animals. They are men- 
tioned by Aristotle, and, if I am not mis- 
taken, by the elder Pliny. Mr. Gosling, 
who is fresh from his books, will kindly 
correct me, if I misstate (subdued snore 
from Mr. G.). The specimen that appeared 



192 



CATCHING A TARTAR. 



'93 



to yon to-day was a cuttle-fish, of the order 
decapod, or having 10 arms." (" Bedad! " 
muttered The O'Bog, who stood in awe of 
the Doctor, " now I know fy thim things is 
called tin tackles.") 

The Doctor, loftily ignoring the Celt's 
existence, continued: 'The octopod has, 
as you well know, but 8 short arms, branch- 
ing from the margin of its mouth, and is 
destitute of the longer tentacles you ob- 
served in the decapod. The latter is fre- 
quently seen in the waters of the Caribbean 
sea and the Mexican gulf. Some of the 
early Norse writers gave astonishing ac- 
counts of the colossal cephalopoda. You 
need not refer to the books. You have 
actually seen what they attempted to de- 
scribe. I am led to assure you, if the day 
is fair to-morrow, you may again see, over 
by Cat island, more than one of these huge 
creatures, sleeping on the water, as is their 
custom after a storm. Er-may I trouble 
you for a light? " 

The next morning every one was earnest- 
ly looking Westward toward Cat island. 
On the surface of the water, now smooth 
and glassy, here bright with golden light, 
there darkened by the shadows of fleeting 
clouds, not the faintest sign of any living 
object could be seen. So those who had 
not yet breakfasted went back to their 
quarters, while others who had already had 
a bite threw out their lines and awaited 
nibbles. 

All of us thought unutterable things of 
the Doctor. There were no fish in the sea, 
apparently; but Antonio, skipper of the lit- 
tle felucca that brought us a semi-weekly 
mail, a Sicilian, explained, with a smile. 
" No leetle feesh-a. Alia same diablo 
feesh-a bime-bye." 

This he accompanied with a graceful 
wave of a thin brown hand to the West; so 
we looked again. A soldier named Elliott, 
a quiet man with a marksman's gray eye, 
said, in a calm voice, he could see some of 
them. Sure enough, not ]A a mile off, dark 
objects were floating on the water. We 
counted 13 huge creatures, like little isl- 
ands. 

In a moment a boat was manned and put 
off, Elliott in the bow with a harpoon. An- 
tonio sprang to his craft and hoisted sail. 
Other enthusiastic fishermen leaped from 
the pier into the vessel, tumbling over each 
other as they reached the deck. The breeze 
was so faint the canvas hung flat, and the 
craft made little headway. By this time the 
pier was crowded and the shore was lined 
with excited spectators. The small boat 
with Elliott in its prow had such a start, and 
the oarsmen pulled so well, the felucca 
could not overtake it; but we came close 
enough to see Elliott standing with one 
foot resting on the gunwale, harpoon 



poised. The monsters still seemed to en- 
joy the sleep of the just. The little boat 
headed for the nearest and largest. When it 
appeared as if the dory would surely run 
against the creature, Elliott drove his 
weapon with mighty force into its back. 

For perhaps 5 seconds, the sea was lashed 
as if by a miniature tempest. The little 
craft was whirled and tossed like a chip. 
Now the felucca approached and made fast. 
The fury of the water gradually subsided; 
bubbles and eddies marked the surface; 
the harpoon line paid out across the 
gunwale with a whiz; and it was ap- 
parent the monster had sought the depths. 
The others had also disappeared. We 
began to move through the water at a 
rapid rate, Cat island to our right as we 
sped by. Our course was Southerly, and in 
front stretched the broad expanse whose 
limit was the Southern shore of the Carib- 
bean sea. 

Both vessels labored and plunged. The 
felucca was " down by the head " and listed 
toward the side on which the dory was 
lashed; while the dory's stern stood up a 
little as her nose bent down. The harpoon- 
line was vertical and taut. This told us our 
submerged friend was striving to drag us 
under water. As he had already shown his 
ability to tow the felucca and her little con- 
sort, in spite of our efforts to put about, 
the possibility that he might corral us all 
in the coral halls of Davy Jones, was more 
exciting than agreeable. Then, too, the 
chance that he would reappear on the sur- 
face and woo us with his enveloping ten- 
tacles did not heighten our pleasure. 

To make matters worse, Antonio told us 
there was nothing to eat on board; and at 
the same time he plaintively pleaded the 
presence of certain provisions in his mail- 
contract, a violation of which would de- 
prive his " cambinettos " of their needed 
loaves and fishes. So, with much reluctance 
and a little hatchet, the bond of our attach- 
ment was cut. At once our headway dimin- 
ished as if an air-brake had been applied. 
Then the felucca, the dory now in tow, put 
about and stood for Ship island, far away 
to the Northeast, its white sands shimmer- 
ing in the light of the descending sun. 

When we stepped ashore, one of the first 
to greet us was the Doctor, who volun- 
teered to go with us next time to show us 
how to land a devil-fish. 

To which The O'Bog, who had been with 
us and had done lots of work while remain- 
ing strangely silent, said: " Ould Aiscu- 
laypious wud talk the tin tackles aff av the 
dekkypod and lave the divil harrumless an' 
widout a leg to shtand on in the middle av 
the say; but he'll not have the likes av me 
in the aujience afther the game he gev us 
lasht night." 



Mm 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY G. E. MOULTHROP. 



THE BATHERS. 
Awarded Eighteenth Prize in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 




COPYRIGHT BY WRIGHT & CARLIN. 

ANTELOPE ON THEIR NATIVE HEATH. 




AMATEUR FLASHLIGHT PHOTO BY J. H. JONES. 

ALL AT HOME. 
Highly Commended by Judges in Recreation's Second Annual Photo Competition. 

194 



A CANOE TRIP TO RAINY LAKE. 



II \KKY SI I.YKK. 



Gold-bearing quartz was discovered in 

Northern Minnesota in the summer of [893, 
though it was really known to a Few hunters 

20 years earlier. It was never fully investi- 
gated, owin^ to the lack of railway facili- 
ties, and to the country being broken by 
lakes and water-courses, so that getting in 
and out was accomplished with difficulty. 
Notwithstanding these drawbacks, many a 
hardy prospector traveled through the 
region North of Rainy lake, and washed 
" colors " from pounded rock. 

The last discoveries were on the shore of 
Rainy lake and along Rainy Lake river, the 
Northern boundary of Minnesota. The 
only way to this new Eldorado was by a 
land-and-water route from Duluth, or a 
water route from the Lake of the Woods, 
up the Rainy river. As both ways were 
roundabout we decided, when the trip was 
planned, to make our way across from 
Fosston, Minnesota, to Rainy Lake city, 
and add the exploring of an undeveloped 
region to the pleasures of an outing. 

Early in the spring of '94, W. J. Hilligoss, 
a veteran cruiser of Northern Minnesota, 
Fred Ayers and I, left Fosston by team for 
Red lake, 65 miles distant. Red Lake 
Agency was reached the next day, just in 
time to get the Captain of the steamer to 
delay starting until we could arrange for 
canoes, guides, etc. With the assistance 
of the merchant at the Agency, who spoke 
Chippewa, we engaged 2 Indians to show 
us an old trail and portage from the head 
waters of the Tamarac ro the Sturgeon. 
We bought a birch-bark canoe and some 
supplies, and loaded all on the steamer. 

A ride of 40 miles to the Northeast end 
of the lake brought us near the mouth of 
Tamarac river, where we were landed about 
midnight. We at once turned in and slept 
till sunrise. 

Our canoes were soon loaded for the long 
voyage. The canoe of the guides was made 
to carry all that could be put into it. They 
watched the loads, and as the pile in theirs 
grew larger, and the pile on shore dimin- 
ished, they showed such signs of displeasure 
we had to let them go; though when we 
came to load our canoe, and 3 of us got 
into it, we found it too heavily laden. 

The bank where we embarked sloped ab- 
ruptly into 15 or 20 feet of water, so it was 
with shaky feeling that we pushed off. 
No accident happened, however. We pad- 
dled steadily until about 3 p. m., when we 
stopped for lunch. Hungry enough we 
were. For 3 hours we had been looking 
for the dry landing place our guides kept 
telling us was just ahead, but finally getting 
disgusted with their idea of distance, we 



pushed our canoe to the dryesl looking 
shore we could see. It may have been dry 
at one time, but now 2 feet of water covered 

it while dry grass, matted above, gave it 
the appearance of land. By hanging tin- 
tea-pot on a limb, and building a fire of 

grass and twigs, we soon had tea, which, 
with our cold meats and baker's br< 
made us forget we had had an unusually 
hard half-day's work. 

The journey was continued until sun- 
down. Then, for want of a better place, 
we camped in a tamarac swamp and swung 
our hammocks to the trees. 

The next day at noon we reached the 
portage. Here our supplies were done up 
into packs, suitable for carrying on the 
back. We made one for each of the Ind- 
ians, who were under agreement to do all 
the packing. They sat by and watched us. 
When all was ready to make the start at the 
portage, they got up and walked back to 
their canoes and took the homeward route. 
The work before them was too much. We 
saw no more of them; but as they were to 
be paid when we reached the Sturgeon, we 
were not out anything. Their departure 
was not regretted, although we were at the 
beginning of a portage we knew nothing 
about. 

We began packing along the trail, over 
trees and stumps, through dense under- 
growth, and swampy places in which we 
sank to the knees at every step. Six trips 
were made, before sunset, to a point about 
a quarter of a mile from the starting place. 
' Here also we were obliged to swing our 
hammocks, as water stood all about. This 
being the second experience in fastening 
our hammocks, we missed some of the ex- 
citement of the night before, when Hilli- 
goss had stood up in his hammock, bal- 
ancing himself on one leg while pulling the 
boot off the other. You can imagine the 
result; no bucking broncho ever landed 
his rider in better style. 

The hard work of this part of the portage 
started the veteran out early next morning, 
along the trail, to find how far it was across 
to the Sturgeon, and in what condition the 
trail might be. In the meantime, the rest 
of us moved the supplies another notch 
along the route. About noon our friend re- 
turned with the information that it was 4 T i 
miles to the river, and that he had met some 
acquaintances, land hunters, w r ho would 
help us. 

With 3 hardy fellows added to our party, 
we made good headway. Camp was pitched 
that night in 2 feet of water; dry land could 
not be found. By cutting a large number 
of small jack pines, we built a crib above 



195 



196 



RECREA TION. 



the water. Covering this with pine boughs, 
we made a comfortable resting place. The 
night was warm and the mosquitoes were 
out in force; so we slept with screens over 
our heads. 

Breakfast was prepared with the stove 
placed on a pile of moss, while the cook 
waded knee-deep in water. 

The trail for the next mile was open, and 
the water deep enough to pull the canoe 
along with all the supplies. 

In this way we dragged our load, taking 
frequent rests and alternately helping each 
other out of a hole. Sometimes one would 
go waist-deep into the soft moss and water, 
which in places seemingly had no bottom. 
Only by grabbing a tree could one extri- 
cate himself. Many laughable scenes were 
witnessed, and in spite of the disagreeable 
features, we appreciated all accidents. 
About 4 o'clock we landed at the Sturgeon. 
I doubt if any weary band of explorers ever 
hailed more heartily a long looked for 
water-course than we did that small stream, 
scarcely 15 feet across. We now had a 
down-stream ride the rest of the way, and 
we turned in early, well satisfied with the 
day's work. 

Camp was aroused a little later by some 
of our hunters attempting to get sight of a 
moose that splashed through the water 
close by, but the night was too dark. 

By 10 o'clock next day we had said good- 
by to the men who helped us in making 
the portage. Soon after we were afloat. 
The banks of the stream showed signs of 
moose all along, and of course we were on 
the lookout, for we wanted a good shot for 
our camera. Indian signs of moose-killing 
were seen. A pole sticking up in the bank, 
with a bone or piece of rawhide fastened 
to it, or a meat-drying rack, were the usual 
methods of marking the spot. Their hunt- 
ing is done at all seasons, and large num- 
bers of these noble animals are slain. The 
Indians are not restricted on or off their 
reservations, and although they are subject 
to the same laws as the white man, these 
laws are not enforced. 

The river broadened as we left the 
tamarac swamp, and rapids were frequent, 
helping us a little faster on our way and 
making the ride pleasant and interesting. 
On we went, through a forest of oak, birch, 
poplar and pine, growing to the water's 
edge, inhabited by moose, caribou, deer 
and smaller game, but enjoyed by only 
shiftless Indians, who have never appreci- 
ated its possession. 

Lunch was had afloat, for we wanted to 
get to the Big Fork river that evening. 
Night overtook us about 3 miles above, 
where we camped. The Big Fork was 
reached next morning about 9 o'clock. 
Here we stayed long enough to exchange 
a few words with an old settler, who had 
made his home at the forks of the rivers, 
thinking the water-power at the rapids 



above would make his land valuable for mill 
and townsite purposes. He now lived by 
fishing; sturgeon being his principal catch, 
the bladders of which he dried and sold. 

The Big Fork, down which we paddled 
5 or 6 miles an hour, is a broad, rapid 
stream, having its source near Lake Win- 
nebegoshish, and winding its way through 
a country of great possibilities. The vast 
amount of timber to be cut and marketed; 
the almost endless extent of land, which 
when cleared and cultivated, will be rich 
and productive, the many opportunities for 
water-power; and the fact that iron and 
coal exist there, w r ili one day make this por- 
tion of Minnesota resound with the hum of 
trade and industry. 

The day's trip was one to delight the 
heart of any lover of canoeing. Taking 
things easy, we moved along, enjoying the 
fine scenery and fresh warmth of the June 
day. Straggling crews of loggers were 
passed, and an occasional batteau-driver, as 
he poled his heavily-loaded boat along the 
shore. 

The high, dry banks were pleasing after 
being so many nights in the swamps. We 
selected a good camping-spot in a pine 
grove and stopped early. Hilligoss, being 
an expert at making balsam-bough beds, 
was assigned this work; while the others 
straightened out the baggage and prepared 
supper. 

The ride to Rainy Lake river was with- 
out incident. We reached the North side 
of the Rainy about dark, and camped on 
the bank near the landing-place of the 
steamer. The next morning we boarded 
her, bound for Fort Francis. 

The boat went down stream a short dis- 
tance to unload some merchandise marked 
for Hannaford, which we found on a map 
to be the destined metropolis of Northern 
Minnesota, but which at that time was a 
clearing of about 5 acres, covered with 
stumps, and not a building in sight. 

Forty miles up the Rainy river, from the 
mouth of the Big Fork, brought us to Fort 
Francis; a small Canadian village, so slow 
and easy-going that when a mail arrived, 
the inhabitants were told of it by a flag on 
a mast in front of the post-office. The at- 
traction here was the falls, which we photo- 
graphed from several directions. 

We took passage on a small steamboat 
that ran daily to Rainy Lake City, and were 
soon in the midst of a country of islands 
and water, which continued until the Gold 
City was reached. . 

This mushroom town, scarcely 4 months 
old, looked prosperous; having 30 or 40 
buildings, ranging from the bachelor's 
cabin to substantial story-and-a-half frame 
houses. Most of the inhabitants were busy 
making boats, and preparing for prospect- 
ing among the surrounding islands. 

We sailed over to the island on which the 
Little American mine is located; then re- 



THE KING OE THE GAULJES. 



197 



turned to the city and were soon on our 
way back to Fort Francis. We were ob- 
liged to wait 48 hours for the steamer, 
bound for the Lake of the Woods and Rat 
Portage. 
The trip by boat from Rainy lake down 



the Rainy river, and across Lake of the 
Woods, will some day become a favorite 
one for pleasure seekers. 

Rainy lake may not rival the Thousand 
Islands, but for natural scenery it is all one 
can wish. 



THE KING OF THE GAULIES. 



MARK T. LEONARD. 



Many of the sportsmen of Western Penn- 
sylvania, West Virginia and Maryland will 
recognize, in the above cut, " The King of 
Gaulie Mountains " whom so many have 




THE KING OF THE GAULTES. 



followed through the wilds of West Vir- 
ginia, in the region about the head waters 
of the Elk and the Gaulie rivers. 

Harmer Sharp is one of the best known 
hunters and guides in that state. His ser- 
vices will not soon be forgotten by those 
who have been with him through the Gau- 
lie, South, Middle, and Leather-bark moun- 
tains. 

His training, from youth, in the science 
of woodcraft in these remote regions, has 
made him a most skilled, cautious and val- 
uable aid to hunters going into these vast, 
unbroken forests. 

It is not generally known that such wild, 
uninhabited regions still exist, within the 
boundary of the old colonial states, as is 
this domain of the Gaulie King. 

Mr. Sharp lives at the foot of the Gaulie 
mountains, near the junction of Slaty fork 
and Elk rivers, where he owns a comfort- 
able little home and 1,000 acres of land, on 
the Northern edge of this mountain wilder- 
ness. 

During the hunting season he guides 
hunters to and from the mountains, where 
many deer and bear are killed each year. 
He is an expert marksman; and when his 
old 45 Winchester sends the echoes ringing 
from hill to hill it generally means one 
more antlered monarch down. " Crock- 
ett " speaks of him as being one of the 
best shots in the state of West Virginia. 

It was Mr. D. C. Braden, the champion 
one-armed wing shot of the world, who 
crowned and dubbed Sharp " King of the 
Gaulies"; and by this name he has since 
become familiarly known among sports- 
men who visit this district. 

Uniontown, Pa. 



" Where can I get good country board? " 

" Well, I should say in the oil regions. 

That's the best bored country I know of." 



-■ 




:;n'|f\;|.-"fc; 


BE?' ' ~%*B*£ ! J 


W5 tiWirtftfu 







TURTLE LAKE CLUB HOUSE. 

Turtle Lake Rod and Gun Club, Canada. 



TURTLE LAKE. 

Turtle lake is about 360 miles Northwest 
of Montreal. Its nearest railroad point is 
North bay, on the Eastern extremity of 
Lake Nipissing, and is the Northern ter 
minal of the Grand Trunk Railway, 227 
miles north of Toronto. 

In the fall of 1895, The Turtle Lake Rod 
and Gun Club was organized, and during 
the summer of 1896, the Club built a new 
house, which is shown in the cut. 

North Bay is reached via Buffalo and To- 
ronto, 24 hours from New York. Fare, for 
round trip, $27.00. Turtle lake is 5 miles 
long, and varies from ~%. of a mile to 2 miles 
in width. It is one of a series of 3 lakes, 
Trout, Turtle and Lake Salmon, which 
form the headwaters of the Mattewan river. 
It is North of all civilization, in the un- 
broken wilderness of Canada. The cabin 
is on an Island, about 3 miles from the head 
of the lake. 

The fishing is excellent; small mouth 
bass abound, varying from 1 to 5 pounds. 
Brook trout are plentiful within a distance 
of a few miles; muskalonge are to be had 
in Turtle and Trout lakes. In 1892 Mr. W. 
B. Capen, a member of the Club, caught one 
weighing 32 pounds. In May and October 
salmon trout fishing is good in Trout lake. 
Pike and pickerel are abundant, and weigh 
as high as 8 pounds. Moose, deer, bear, 
foxes, and smaller game are found in the 
adjacent woods. Ducks and ruffed grouse 
can be had after the middle of August. The 
average temperature is 65 p F., for August. 
There are no mosquitoes nor black flies 
after July 20th. 

October and November are the best 
months for hunting. 




I send you a picture of a high bred 
cocker spaniel, owned by Mrs. A. J. Per- 
ham, Wakefield, Mass. He is a very intel- 
ligent dog and besides being a fine hunter 
can do a number of interesting tricks. He 
is a favorite with everyone, on account of 
his kind disposition and his great intelli- 
gence. He is now 8 years old. 

Percy J. Bowker, Bryant Pond, Me. 



ELKLAND. 

ERNEST SETON THOMPSON. 



Any man who would describe a trip from 
New York out to the West must be either a 
Shakespeare or a fool. I do not claim to 
be either. 

As we left Minneapolis, in the glow of a 
red sunset, we had the first truly Western 
thrill. We had crossed the Mississippi, but 
now, for the first time, I really felt myself 
back in the West*. A prairie meadowlark 
sang the dear, old strain so familiar and so 
long unheard and his song awakened many 
pleasant memories. 

As we went on we continued to look for 
news of the formidable Indian rising that 
the papers were then full of. At New 
York it was a terrible and bloody outbreak. 
At Chicago it was widespread and danger- 
ous. At St. Paul it was very threatening. 
At Bismarck the authorities were said to 
be taking precautions. At Miles City, few 
seemed to know anything about it, but one 
man remembered that trie sheriff had ar- 
rested an Indian for being drunk and im- 
polite. 

While I am correcting popular error, let 
me give you a quiet hint about that badger 
business. There's nothing in it. I mean 
the report that an enterprising Yankee, at 
Bismarck, has a lot of tame badgers trained 
to dig postholes, and that he is making a 
fortune by their hitherto wasted energies. 
. At the Mandan Railway station is an 
interesting display of curios, among which 




"ABOUT THAT BADGER BUSINESS." 

is a shorelark, mounted as the taxidermist 
thought it should be. The man is a dis- 
coverer as well as an artist, and having 
satisfied himself that the shorelark belongs 
to the owl family he improved on all previ- 
ous attempts, and produced something like 
this. If he meant it for a joke, it is a good 
one. If he didn't it's better. 

It is well known that a sensible person 
always conforms to the custom of the coun- 





try he is in. And we, 
determined to be like 
the natives, outfitted 
at Chicago, with 
broad sombreros and 
complete cowboy 

(and cow girl) togs. A SHORELARK PROP- 
Of course, we felt a ERLY (?) MOUNTED, 
little strange among 

the Easterners; but we knew that once over 
the river, we should be merged in the mass. 
As we went Westward, we could see a faint 
infusion of broad brims, but still our som- 
breros were away West of the West. 

We continued to hope we should not be 
peculiar when we were really in it; and at 
last, on arriving at the Yellowstone Park, 
we encountered the 
first genuine cowboy, 
in up to date togs. 
He wore a hat like 
our own and we felt 
that at last we were 
en regie. We were; 
and all would have 
been well, but alas! 
alas! we soon learned 
that he was a dude, 
fresh from New 
York, and out West 
for the first time in 
his life. 

Twice in one day, 
during our trip across 
the prairie, did I see the dry grass set on 
fire by sparks from our own engine, when 
the use of the exhaust sent showers of 
burning coals from the smoke stack. These 
fires were of course attributed, by the set- 
tlers, to marauding Indians. 

About noon of June 8th, we entered the 
paradise called the badlands. They pre- 
sented the most bewilderingly beautiful 
and fantastic formations, and exquisite 
tints, I ever saw. The journey through 
them was like a succession of unspeakable 
sunsets. I now realized, for the first time, 
what was meant by the color vulgarization 
of many of our well known artists, who 
have flattered themselves they could show 
the world, on canvas, what the badlands 
are like. As soon as possible, I shall at- 
tempt my own vulgarizing of their deli- 
cate hues. 

At Livingston we entered the moun- 
tains. Now, between ourselves, I have 
never had much love for mountains. They 
always seem to me aggressive, overpower- 
ing, inaccessible and brutal; and they al- 
ways seem posing for admiration. They 
give one a shut-in feeling, and make things 
seem close and stuffy. I am a prairie bird, 
you see, and whenever I see a large moun- 



"WE OUTFITTED 
AT CHICAGO." 



199 



200 



RECREATION. 



tain, I always think what a grand prairie 
it would make if it were taken away, alto- 
gether. 

However, mountains are charmingly in- 
constant in color, which they cannot help, 
for the prairie sun shines on them; so they 
may prove interesting. I shall reserve 
judgment. This is my first introduction, 
and it may be that, like ancestral Lim- 
burger, one may learn to like mountains by 
perseverance. 

The other passengers uttered a lot of 
expressions that were quite new to me; 
such as, 

" Look at those mountains; aren't they 
grand? " 

" Oh, how I do love mountains," etc., 
etc. 

Of course, I made a sketch. That's what 
I came for. 

In the Park we saw the marara but 

no! I won't. I didn't want to see the . 

Honest I didn't. But we " was druv," and 
forced to it. The only satisfaction I got 
was by pretending to know more about 
them than the guide did. And before long, 
the drove, then the guide, and finally I, my- 
self, began to believe it was really so. 

We promptly made the acquaintance of 
Captain Anderson, the monarch regent of 
the National park, and of General Young, 
the heir apparent. Captain Anderson has 
made a successful and accessible preserve 
of this place; and while he is personally 
one of the most popular men ever branded 
U. S. he seems to love the hate of bad 
men; and there is no lack of free and in- 
dependent citizens hungering for his scalp. 
Men who know what he has done for the 
Park will be delighted to learn that at Gar- 
diner, the other day, a lawless tough was 
overheard telling another, 

" Damned if I don't believe Young is 
going to turn out meaner and cusseder, 
even, than Anderson." 

As we hadn't come on a poaching expe- 
dition, and as moreover we were backed 
by Recreation, we found the military des- 
potism of the Park the reverse of irksome. 
It was the dread despot himself who 
showed us around, and helped us to the 
best guide, and the inside track, whenever 
there was one; who assisted in getting to- 
gether an outfit; who gave us letters of 
safe conduct (so to speak) ; who uncorked 
his finest O. K. W. ; who admonished "all 
whom it might concern " that we were 
backed; who convoyed us to our first 
camp, and who looked us up, periodically, 
to see that we lacked nothing. We found 
it difficult to reconcile our experience with 
the current account of the inhuman mon- 
ster who reigned over the Park. 

This is Elkland. Way back in the for- 
ties, according to Dodge, and other au- 
thorities, it was common to see bands of 
10,000 to 15,000 elk, on the Yellowstone. 
To-day they say bands of 2,000 to 3,000 are 



not rare, in the autumn. Wherever one 
goes, one finds elk horns. They litter the 
hills, and obstruct the little streams. One 
is never out of sight of at least 2 or 3. The 
other day I counted 8, within 100 yards. 
The photographer at the Springs has made 
a garden fence of some 120 shed antlers, 
picked up in the neighborhood, and the 
whole country, high and low, is pebbled 
over with elk signs. We are living on Elk 
creek. Yet we have not seen a single elk. 

The reason is said to be that they are all 
up in the mountains, at their summer re- 
sorts, in 3 social grades. Lowest, in the 
wooded pasture lands, are the does, with 
the fawns. Next grade, higher up, are the 
yearlings; and away uo near the snow line 
are the bucks, devoting their every mo- 
ment and energy to growing their immense 
antlers and getting fat for the social life 
and lively doings of the fall — and for the 
annual winter famine. 

From time to time, on our travels, we 
come to a scene like this; and when we re- 
member there were 6 feet of snow last win- 
ter, and that the saplings in the valleys 
have the bark gnawed off, for many feet 
up, it is not necessary to call in the aid of a 
poacher to account for the downfall of the 
antler-bearer. 

When I say we have not seen an elk, 
that means we did not during the first 
week. We saw plenty of antelope; and one 
evening a pair of blacktail deer strolled up 
to our cabin door, and blew their noses at 
us. Nearly everyone we questioned replied, 

"Why, yes; I saw 60 or 70 elk a mile 
from here." Or 

"' Yes, I saw about 100, back of the 
ridge," etc. 

At length we girded our loins and our 
horses, and said 

" Here goes for Elkland. This cabin 
isn't much more than a mile higher than 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY MRS. E. S. THOMPSON. 

FALLEN. 



ELK LAND. 



20 I 



New York; so we'll head for the high life 
summer resorts." 

My wife and I, accompanied by Dave 
Roberts, an experienced hand, set out to- 
gether. First we rode up to a favorite wa- 
tering place, the "Nymph Spring." No! 




AT 40 YARDS. 

not high enough. We tried Calcite Springs 
and Lohe. No! another 1,000 feet needed. 
And we took the elevator once more, com- 
ing to a high, upland plateau over Tower 
creek. Then, looking around, we saw 3 
antelope. It was like a jeer. They seemed 
to say,- 

" You ain't high at all. You are away 
down on the plains, among the antelope." 

So we kept on, and at last struck a great 
multiplex track. This led us into a wood, 
and we came, finally, on a band of cow elk 
— the lowest of the 3 social grades. 

They were lying down, and I had time 



to make a few sketches, at 40 yards. And 
here let me remark that my sketches are 
not photos. They are impressions; and 
with the help of a little imagination (you 
have one, I suppose) they will suggest 
pictures — maybe. 

Well, I sketched away at the elk, and 
made notes that were useful — to me at least 
— when suddenly the wind changed. They 
must have smelt us, for they ran. The 
dozen we had seen became scores. The 
alarm spread, and away they went, leaping, 
and crashing through the woods, till the 
sound was like that of a tornado; and they 
passed from our sight. 

This was the first time either of us had 
seen a wild elk. It was also one of the 
times when we had no camera; but we 
shall soon go elking again, and shall go 
fully armed. Don't mention this to the 




AT 50 YARDS. 

Park authorities, and you shall have some 
of the results, whether or no. 

Here are some elk signs, for an appro- 
priate tail piece. 






1. Winter ; chiefly of bark. 



ELK DROPPINGS. 

2 and 3. Spring ; bark and grass mixed. 
5. Summer ; wholly grass, 



4. Summer ; chiefly grass. 



THE' BEAR, THE BELLE, AND THE BLACKBERRIES. 

FRANCES WEBSTER. 



If any apology is needed for the second- 
ary position of the Belle, in the title, it will 
be found in the state of the young lady's 
mind when she met the bear. At that mo- 
ment, he was the more important. 

Isabel Reed had the good fortune to be 
pleasing in appearance; so some of her ad- 
mirers, with no great effort of wit, called 
her " the belle." All one winter Miss Reed 
burned the candle at both ends, and at- 
tended strictly to the occupation of amus- 
ing herself all summer. By autumn, she 
was thin, nervous and cross. In conse- 
quence, she was banished to the country to 
recover her lost health and temper, and to 
furnish a subject for this story. 

She found a quiet home in a country 
village, with a relative, where she rested 
for a short time. Then she turned her at- 
tention to the people about her. The coun- 
try girls and their beaus, as her aunt called 
them, interested her. There were more 
girls than young men at East Saugus; con- 
sequently much competition. 
I Miss Belle stepped daintily into the 
arena, taking in the situation with wide 
open eyes of experience. She resolved to 
establish peace in the ranks, for a time, by 
conquering the whole company at once. 
The native belles did not recognize the 
temper of their foeman's steel. They hard- 
ly thought the thin, pale stranger danger- 
ous. They had to learn the value of her 
tact and social experience. 

It soon came about that when she 
walked, Madge Earle's quondam admirer 
carried her umbrella; when she sailed, it 
was May Lewis' beau who managed the 
boat. She talked and rode with escorts in- 
numerable. At the parties given in her 
honor, she was surrounded by attentive 
young men. She sang, and they all lis- 
tened; she smiled, and the other girls were . 
forgotten. To make matters worse, she 
was so charming to the discomfited maid- 
ens, they themselves could not but admire 
her. Belle did not flirt, as they understood 
the matter. No young man monopolized 
her, none made love to her. 

Let it not be thought she sanctioned neg- 
lect of other girls. She somehow made it 
known to the young men that courtesy to 
all is duty. She raised the standard of com- 
pany behavior. In her bright presence no 
girl frowned or pouted, but they learned to 
, smile, at suitable times, and say pleasant 
things always. In this way, unconsciously, 
Belle brought to East Saugus the spell of 
social observance. 

Miss Reed was used to marked attention, 
but she had never reigned before. It re- 
quired diplomacy to keep the train intact, 



letting no one advance or retreat. She en- 
joyed herself immensely, as did the least 
favored of the village girls, who had no 
beau to lose. Belle, on the rare occasions 
when her conscience pricked her, made 
them, together with her short stay — and 
Richard Lane, her excuse. 

He and Belle had long been friends, but 
had quarrelled. If any trifling heartache 
had arisen from this affair, she may have 
hoped to get rid of it by distributing it 
among the other girls. With much sur- 
prise, she saw Lane arrive, with the morn- 
ing mail, 2 weeks after her own arrival. 
Before she met him, this was all hidden. 
She smiled sweetly, and coolly gave him 
a chair on the piazza. 

" How do you amuse yourself here? " he 
asked, after some formalities. 

" I am not in search of amusement. I 
came here to rest; it is very quiet." 

" Would you not like to go for a ride? 
Perhaps I can get a rig." 

" Thank you," she smiled, " I am going 
this afternoon — with a young man here, a 
Mr. Rogers." 

" Ah, then how about a stroll, or a row 
this evening," he persisted. 

" I am so sorry, but I told Mr. Moore I 
would walk with him this evening; and 
possibly there will be a boating party. If 
I had known you were coming " 

" Yes, I see," he interrupted, " Well, I 
will leave you to your friends. If at any 
time you have an hour for me, you can send 
word. Good morning." 

Belle looked after him as he went down 
the street. " He needs a lesson," she said 
under her breath. " Yes, I will send word 
— when I forget myself." 

She went on with her rides and other 
amusements. At every turn she met Lane, 
smiling and happy, surrounded by a grOup 
of beaming girls. How he had managed 
to meet them, Belle did not know. The 
girls revelled in the situation. They turned 
the tables with all their might. Parties, pic- 
nics and all possible diversions rapidly suc- 
ceeded each other. When the 2 strangers 
met, they were indifferently civil. The as- 
tonished young men found the girls able to 
talk of nothing but Mr. Lane's attractions. 

For a final festival, before Belle's de- 
parture, and as a last resort of inventive- 
ness, a blackberry-picking excursion was 
arranged, by May Lewis. 

" You see," she said, to George Moore, 
" it will make a nice, long ride, for we will 
go to Burnt mountain and take our lunch- 
eon. We can pick berries or not, as we 
please. It is lovely there; so wild. Mr. 
Lane will enjoy it," 



THE BEAR THE BELLE, AND THE BLACKBERRIES. 203 



" Perhaps Miss Reed may not care to 
go." 

" Perhaps not; " very sweetly; " it may be 
too rough for her. Still, Mr. Lane wishes 
it, and we will arrange it somehow." 

Early the next morning, about 20 young 
people left Saugus, in one large wagon. 
Belle occupied the front seat with the 
driver. Her tin pail was as big as any- 
body's; her face wore its brightest smiles. 
Pier's was the clearest voice in all the song 
and laughter. 

For a mile the road wound through the 
forest; then came a clearing. The side of 
the mountain for acres was covered with 
stumps and blackberry bushes. The horses 
and wagon were left at a house by the road, 
and the gay party started out, laden with 
empty pails and lunch baskets. With the 
tact that kept her place pre-eminent, Belle 
chose 2 little brothers for her escort. They 
were the first to reach the berries. Belle 
was the life of the party all that day. Her 
smiles and pleasant words were distributed 
as plentifully as the blackberries, and were 
just about as impersonal. 

The merry crowd picked and ate, and 
picked to fill the pails, which soon grew 
heavy; ate more berries, and then lunch. 
The girls got lost, and were found again. 
They tumbled from stumps and slippery 
logs. They found treasures of goldenrod 
and autumn leaves; more than the most 
gallant of the boys could or would carry; 
but never for a moment did they forget to 
entertain Richard Lane. As for him, if his 
head was not turned, it was because he un- 
derstood the situation. 

When it was yet early, all the berries 
they could carry had been gathered. So the 
pails were grouped in an open space while 
the pickers rested. Belle looked at the 
spoils with pride. 

" My berries are really the finest," she 
said. 

" Let's exchange," suggested some one, 
in a whisper. 

" Ah— no," said Belle, with energy, " I'll 
hide mine." With a little effort, she lifted 
her pail and carried it some distance along 
the path, around a clump of bushes, out of 
sight of the party. She quickly came back, 
flushed and laughing, to join the others, 
who were climbing to some rocks higher up 
the hill, where, warm and tired, they all 
rested. 

" Would you really have cared," asked 
May Lewis, " if any one had exchanged 
berries with you?" 

" Indeed I would. They are not black- 
berries alone, but also sentiments. To-mor- 
row Aunt and I will put sugar with them, 
cook them and put them into jars. Later 
I will pack them into my trunk. Next win- 
ter I shall eat them all — yes — all. I will de- 
vour my memories of East Saugus; my 
moonlight rows, the delightful drives, the 
dance in Mr. Moore's new barn " 



"And what of us," interrupted Moore; 
" Are we, also, to be devoured? " 

" I think you have been," whispered 
Madge Earle." 

Young Moore was a handsome fellow. 
As he lay against the gray rocks, looking 
up into Belle's face, Lane noticed, and in- 
terrupted. 

" There is a well defined path," he said, 
" across this field. Is there another house 
in here? " 

" That's a bear trail," calmly explained 
one of the little brothers. 

" Ah's! " " Oh my's! " and various cries 
arose in chorus from the girls. 'Over the 
group had come disquietude; a decided 
tendency to peer closely into the bushes; 
to start at sounds. 

" As Mr. Lane's geographical thirst 
seems to have spoiled our good time," 
Belle said, rising, " let us go." 

She led the way down the hill, to the spot 
where the berries were stored. The other 
girls picked up the baskets and started 
toward the house. The young men, led by 
Moore and Belle, went to get the berries. 
He offered to carry hers for her. 

" Yes, but I must find them and carry 
them a little way. I intend to eat them all, 
and as I did not pick them all, I wish to do 
something to cement my ownership." 

The boys picked up the pails and started 
to follow the girls, Richard well in advance. 

Moore and the little brothers dallied, 
waiting for Belle and her berries. At that 
moment a cry startled them. It was not 
loud, but alarming. It thrilled one heart, 
Richard's, for it was his name, and the 
voice was Belle's. The young men sprang 
with him to the nook where she had placed 
her precious berries against a stump. 

She stood with head thrown back and 
hands raised, facing a great black bear! It 
had risen on its haunches and was holding 
up its paws as if to imitate the girl. Near 
it, half emptied, lay the pail, while the red 
juice of the berries dripped from bruin's 
jaws. 

Lane was the first to act. He sprang for- 
ward and would have made some foolish 
attempt to rescue Belle, but Moore quickly 
grasped him by the arm. 

" Hush," Moore said. " All draw back. 
Belle, come here, slowly; keep your eyes 
on the bear." 

With rare presence of mind, she obeyed. 
As she retreated, the bear settled down to 
his interrupted feast. Belle clung to Rich- 
ard's arm with all her might. She did not 
realize yet her complete capitulation. All 
now retreated in good order, though most 
of the party felt a strong desire to run. 

Belle was petted, consoled and made 
much of. She was too excited to realize 
her adventure. She lost her self control and 
laughed and cried a little, like any girl, and 
the girls liked her better for it — and for one 
other reason. 



204 



RECREA TION. 



All of the party were at the station the 
next day, to say good-by to Belle, and to 
Richard, for he went with her. They took 
no jam with them; but the next autumn 
they received several jars, together with 
more expensive presents. 

At East Saugus, people still relate won- 



derful tales, until they become traditions, 
of the charming city girl, a real belle, who 
reigned among them for a space, and who 
was the heroine of an interesting, though 
not fully understood, love story, and of her 
real, indisputable meeeting with a bear," on 
Burnt mountain. 



A BOATING SONG. 



E. W. MASON. 



Lazily dip our quiet oars 
As we steal away from the silent shores 
That erst have rung with notes of glee, 
And re-echoed our heart-felt revelry. 
Slumbers the wave, but wherever the blade 
Reluctant a lingering plunge has made, 
Its path is with flashes of pearl-foam dight, 
And the sleeping billow springs into light." 

E'en thus from the slumbering past, of thee 

Arises a gleam of memory; 

And the meanest sights have power to 

bring 
Thy form to my nightly imagining: 
Sittest thou now — 'tis the hour of love — 
On the rock-worked couch in the orange 

grove, 



Where from shrub to shrub, with their tiny 

light 
The fire flies flit through the perfumed 

night. 



O then, when drifts the moon's pale beam 
Through trellised boughs on yon murmur- 
ing stream 
And calmly white the effulgence rests 
On the black rough stones, midst the flash- 
ing crests, 
Think but of me, as away we glide 
And skim the green sea's quiet tide, 
And swiftly dip our sparkling oars 
As we dart from the shade of the silent 
shores! 



DEAD BROKE. 

Break, break, break 

On thy white-shelled beach, O sea! 
But you'll never be half so broke (no joke!) 

As the hotel bill made me! 

O well for the bathing suit boy 

That he shouts when the waves are at 
play! 
O well for the sailor lad, 

For he has no hotels to pay! 

And the stately ships go down 

To the haven under the hill; 
But O for a check on a river bank 

That could settle a hotel bill! 

— Atlanta Constitution. 



HOW WE PHOTOGRAPHED THE WILD CAT. 



COYOTE BILL. 



We called him " Old Kodunk." His 
maiden name, that he brought to Colorado 
with him, was " Big Kate"; but when he 
got struck by lightning- we christened him 
" Old Fireworks." Then when he insisted 
on calling my kodak a " kodunk " we 
branded him over again. Just what his 
sure enough name was I never learned. 
He was so modest he never seemed to care 
to talk about himself, and his past life, and 
I never urged him. 

But as I was going to say, when Old 
Kodunk got mad about the coyote pho- 
tographing contest, I had to round up a 
new partner, in the trapping business. He 
was a tenderfoot, just out from the East, 
but he seemed about the right calibre, and 
had a look in his eye that said he would 
hang to danger till the rope broke, and 
then go chase it. So I told him I guessed 
he'd do. We set our traps in a w r ild little 
canyon, where I had caught wild cats the 
season before. I furnished the traps and 
horses and he rode out every morning to 
look after the traps, and was to bring me 
word if we caught anything worth photo- 
graphing. 

I knew there were lots of skunks in the 
canyon, as well as wild cats; but I did not 
let him know it. I reckoned he would find 
it out for himself. And he did, you bet, for 
he caught one or 2 skunks every morning, 
for about a week, and buried a suit of 
clothes every day, till he had nothing left 
of his wardrobe but a pair of boxing gloves. 

So one morning, when he failed to show 
up at the store, I guessed something was 
wrong and slid around to his house to see 
what the trouble was. I found him sitting 
out in the back yard, with nothing on but 
a pair of old overalls and a gunny sack. 

He looked sad and disgusted, like, and 
didn't wear his accustomed smile. Guess 
he had buried it with his last suit of clothes. 
When I got around on the off side of him, 
away from the wind, I inquired the cause 
of his seeming sadness; but he didn't seem 
inclined to talk much and, fearing he might 
get mad and quit, I didn't urge him. I 
merely reminded him that "faint heart 
never won fair lady "; that " virtue was its 
own reward " and a few other quotations, 
of similar nature, that I had read in Shake- 
speare and in Recreation. 

Then I loaned him an old suit of cor- 
duroys and turned him loose again on the 
cat track. It was not long after this till 
I met him, one morning, coming up the 
street, with a big smile playing on his coun- 
tenance, like a flock of buzzards around a 
dead steer, and I knew he had caught some- 
thing more than a skunk this time. 



" Hurry up! Fox in one trap, wild cat 
in the other. I killed the fox, but the cat's 
alive and all right for a picture. Saddle 
your camera and bring your horse, and 
be quick about it." He got things mixed 
a bit; but I knew what he meant, and was 
not slow in getting my snapshot outfit in 
shape for the trip. 

We had made our brags that if we got 
a wild cat we would first take its picture 
and then bring it in alive. I knew the eyes 
of the amateurs of the country were upon 
us, and that. the Recreation prize was at 
stake. I also knew it was no easy job to 
take a Rocky mountain wild cat out of a 
steel trap and bring him in alive. I wished 
I had Old Kodunk back again, for he never 
missed fire on such occasions; so I sent 
him a cipher dispatch, by a kid, on horse 
back: 

" Bring lariat. Wild cat alive in trap. 
Take our old trail by Convict Wilson's 
cabin. Coyote Bill." 

It fetched him, you bet, and he was there 
on time. I thought while we were having 
a picnic with the wild cat we might as well 
stir up the other animals too; so we got 
one of the cow boys to start the report 
that we had a mountain lion, and were go- 
ing to fetch him in alive. 

We got a big crowd in no time and di- 
rected them to take the right hand trail be- 
yond the Soda Point; but while they were 
off after horses and saddles we slid out in 
a hurry, on the left hand trail a mile this 
side, and were soon paying our compli- 
ments to the wild cat. 

He didn't seem much pleased to meet us 
and kicked up an awful dust when he saw 
the kodak. Then we let him have one end 
of the lariat, across his back, and he 
squared around as if he were ready for 
business; opened his mouth wide and 
cussed us, in cat language, in great shape. 

I got in 2 good shots with the camera, 
but they didn't suit me. Light was not 
quite right. So we dusted him off again, 
with the lariat, and coaxed him up a little 
cedar tree where he sat, looking out be- 
tween 2 limbs as natural as could be; just 
as the sun peeps out over old Pike's peak. 

Such a chance for a snap shot a fellow 
doesn't often get; and I improved the op- 
portunity. I took 2 turns at him with the 
kodak. Then we got the lariat around his 
East end, and a smaller rope around his 
West end, and strung him out. I took an- 
other snap just as he was helping himself 
to a bite of Old Kodunk's whiskers. Then, 
after a good deal of cussing from Old Ko- 
dunk, and words of exhortation from the 



205 



2o6 



RECREATION, 



" skunk killer," we got the cat in the sack, 
all right, and hit the trail for home. 

We had plenty of fun with the wild cat, 
but it was more fun watching the suckers 
on the hills, a mile beyond. " The woods 
were full of 'em " — men and boys on horse- 
back, looking for the mountain lion we had 
told them of. 

We hurried on so as to get out of sight 
before they saw us. Old Kodunk was in 
the lead, pushing his horse along as fast 
as he dared, down the steep trail, when all 
at once, just as we reached the bottom, we 
saw something on the trail, just ahead, 
coming our way. 

"What is it?" I asked. 

" Wonder if it's branded," said Kodunk. 
The skunk killer laughed and looked kind 
of surprised, but seemed to know what " it " 
was as soon as he saw it. 

From what he told me afterward I judged 
they were quite common where he came 
from. Don't think they even took the 
trouble to brand 'em. " It " proved to be 
a young professor, fresh from Oberlin Col- 
lege. He was out here for his health; 
growing a new lining on the inside of his 
breathing box. He was one of your high 
toned young ducks, and wore a silk hat, 
a white neck tie and gold rim eye glasses 
— one of the kind that sleeps on a diction- 
ary and covers himself with a grammar. 
He fired a whole charge of proper lan- 
guage into us, before wc had a chance to 
pull a gun or get under cover. 

" Pardon me gentlemen; I km informed 
you have been fortunate enough to pro- 
cure a catamount, a